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Windows 7 install taking up more room than usual?

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September 26, 2011 2:12:37 AM

I just did a fresh install of Windows 7 Professional on a 60GB OCZ Vertex 3 and the drive is down to a remaining 15GB out of 55.7 total available space. This is confusing because my last several installs of the exact same OS on the exact same size drives took up much less space. Even after installing several programs like Photoshop and Office, I still had 24GB to spare on my last install with a 60GB Agility 2.

So I've lost a ton of storage somewhere and I can't figure out why. Any ideas?
September 26, 2011 3:07:58 AM

It sounds about right.

My work system has Win 7 Pro, MS Office 2007, Corel Draw + bits and pieces of small stuff and is currently 54gb used. (20gb of my documents)

download and install a program called "WinDirStat" it will show you where all of your space has gone.
Related resources
September 26, 2011 3:17:41 AM

HugoStiglitz said:
It sounds about right.

My work system has Win 7 Pro, MS Office 2007, Corel Draw + bits and pieces of small stuff and is currently 54gb used. (20gb of my documents)

download and install a program called "WinDirStat" it will show you where all of your space has gone.



But I have two drives with the exact same OS installed and one has many more programs than the other but is taking up 15GB less space.
September 26, 2011 3:25:14 AM

TreeSize. Google it.
September 26, 2011 3:26:32 AM

HugoStiglitz said:
http://windirstat.info/wds_current_setup.exe

windirstat link


Okay thanks for this link. I ran windirstat and found some interesting information but I'm not sure what to make of it. Under the files tab, there are two .sys files, "pagefile" and "hiberfil". On the new drive, these files are huge, 16GB and 12GB. On the other drive, they are only 7GB and 4GB, so that's an extra 17GB and would solely explain the extra space being taken up.

What are these files and why are they so big on one drive but not the other?
September 26, 2011 3:46:04 AM

Okay I came across this thread from the OCZ forums which lead me to a fix. http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/showthread.php?...

Apparently the pagefile.sys and hyberfil.sys files have to do with storing data while hibernating and are related to the size of your RAM. For the new Windows install, I switched from a 4GB RAM to 16GB RAM system so this explains the significantly larger file sizes. Turning off hibernation from the command prompt with "powercfg.exe /hibernate off" removes the files and frees up tons of space, but now I am unable to hibernate.
a b $ Windows 7
September 26, 2011 4:11:13 AM

djsprinkle said:
but now I am unable to hibernate.


Disabling hibernation is among the 1st things I have done to every box I have ever built in the last 2-3 years. Other than peeps who spend tons of time in airports on little laptops, I have yet to find a worthwhile use for hibernation while it's been at the heart of much of my troubleshooting efforts. USB devices oft do not like hibernate, backup programs get borked, and the list goes on. A machine will boot off a SSD in 15 seconds, exactly what are ya hoping to save ?
September 26, 2011 5:25:59 AM

WinDirstat, the colored boxes show different file types, the physical size of the box shows how large the file is.

so your able to reign in your install size now?
I dont use hibernate on my desktop pc at all.
laptops would be a different story however.

I agree with JackNaylorPE. Hibernate / Sleep has never been the most stable of features.

I hope i've been able to help
a b $ Windows 7
September 26, 2011 7:05:24 AM

djsprinkle said:
I just did a fresh install of Windows 7 Professional on a 60GB OCZ Vertex 3 and the drive is down to a remaining 15GB out of 55.7 total available space. This is confusing because my last several installs of the exact same OS on the exact same size drives took up much less space. Even after installing several programs like Photoshop and Office, I still had 24GB to spare on my last install with a 60GB Agility 2.

So I've lost a ton of storage somewhere and I can't figure out why. Any ideas?




Hey djsprinkle,


read some here

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/270102-32-useful-arti...
a b $ Windows 7
September 26, 2011 11:37:25 AM

if you have 16gb of ram you can also reduce your pagefile or turn it off altogether--i have mine off on my ssd with 12gb of ram--though i believe a few programs dont like no pagefile such as photoshop cs5 personally i have had no problems--you could just set it to 1gb and get another large space back

Best solution

a b $ Windows 7
September 26, 2011 7:57:32 PM
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Well its getting off topic now : )

Actually CS5 loves page file and RAM when running memory-intensive features do.

Where there is lots of RAM as a benefit there is a benefit of large page file. There is a reason for it.

RAM memory intensive programs do benefit from large file, but folks with average use and limited space(this case), may reduce the size so it is not counterproductive .


Some read here,

TweakHound - Tweaking Windows 7
The Page File, SuperFetch, and ReadyBoost

The Page File

1. The average user is best served by LEAVING THE PAGE FILE ALONE. Windows 7 does an excellent job of managing the page file settings for most people.

2. For 99.999% of the configurations on the planet you need a page file. Windows 7 itself wants one and a number of programs out there do too. If you think you can run your machine optimally without a page file you do not understand how Windows 7 (or any NT based OS works).
(Please don't email me to argue this, I won't respond. Find a forum to argue about it.)

3. The recommendations below are not designed to give you the highest scores on a synthetic benchmark but to give you the best overall performance for your system (including stability). The size of hard drives today are huge and making the page file a little larger than it "needs" to be hurts nothing and you're covered if you're ever doing something that requires more.

From Microsoft:
"Page file size equal to RAM: Prior to Windows 7 the default paging file size was determined differently on different versions of Windows. But in general terms, when the paging file size was configured as “system-managed” its size would typically be calculated as RAM x (some number greater than 1) or RAM + (some number).
In Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 the default size is equal to the amount of memory installed in the machine. Your gut reaction to this is probably the same as mine was – to get a successful complete memory dump the paging file needs to be a little larger than RAM. How much larger probably goes back to what version of Windows you are running and other factors, but 300 MB is generally considered plenty of padding for the purposes of getting a complete dump.
Not to worry. A default installation of Windows 7 or Server 2008 R2 is configured to generate a kernel memory dump and also with a system-managed paging file size. So a paging file equal to RAM is plenty. If you decide that you want to capture a complete memory dump, simply change the dump option to “Complete memory dump” and restart (be sure to leave the paging file size as system-managed). After the restart the paging file should be RAM + 300 MB. This applies to both client and server SKUs."
ASKPERF - Windows 7 / Windows Server 2008 R2: Upgrade Paths, Registry Enhancements, Crash Dumps and Page File Sizing

http://www.tweakhound.com/windows7/tweaking/7.html


Should the pagefile be placed on SSDs?

Yes. Most pagefile operations are small random reads or larger sequential writes, both of which are types of operations that SSDs handle well.

In looking at telemetry data from thousands of traces and focusing on pagefile reads and writes, we find that
Pagefile.sys reads outnumber pagefile.sys writes by about 40 to 1,
Pagefile.sys read sizes are typically quite small, with 67% less than or equal to 4 KB, and 88% less than 16 KB.
Pagefile.sys writes are relatively large, with 62% greater than or equal to 128 KB and 45% being exactly 1 MB in size.

In fact, given typical pagefile reference patterns and the favorable performance characteristics SSDs have on those patterns, there are few files better than the pagefile to place on an SSD.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/e7/archive/2009/05/05/support-a...
October 3, 2011 2:19:15 AM

Best answer selected by djsprinkle.
a b $ Windows 7
October 4, 2011 12:41:17 AM

This thread has been closed by Nikorr
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