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What are the chances an E8400 will bottleneck the GT300 or the R800?

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July 9, 2009 5:45:09 PM

I'm only talking single GPU case scenario here.

I don't think the E8400 will bottleneck any current GPU, as long as I keep it single... but I'm thinking about holding on to my 8800GT and then move to the GT300 (most likely).

So.... how might an E8400 (mine has OC 4ghz+) stand up to those GPUs?

Slight bottleneck? No bottleneck? Serious bottleneck?
a c 191 U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 5:46:52 PM

There are no figures to base a reply on.
Wait until the cards are released and reappraise the situation when some facts turn up;)
a c 130 U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 5:48:57 PM

Technically No not a chance, in practical terms a faster CPU will usually result in more FPS with a decent GPU.
From that standpoint, restricted, capable of better, but bottlenecked.
No Chance.

Mactronix
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July 9, 2009 5:51:06 PM

mactronix said:
Technically No not a chance, in practical terms a faster CPU will usually result in more FPS with a decent GPU.
From that standpoint, restricted, capable of better, but bottlenecked.
No Chance.

Mactronix



That was slightly confusing :whistle: 

So you think it won't cause a bottleneck?
a c 130 U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 6:06:31 PM

Ok sorry,
I think if it does restrict the fps it wont be to a level where it matters to you or your gaming.
As i said almost always a faster CPU will result in a decent GPU getting more FPS, this isnt a bottleneck as such just a system restriction, i realise you are probably using the word bottleneck to mean will it cause the GPU to run slower than it could, but being practical about it even a top of the range i7 shows increases when Overclocked so its kind of a relative question.

I think you will be fine but as said you wont be sure untill said GPU is released

Mactronix
a c 236 U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 6:11:45 PM

i agree with mactronix and realize just about every PC out there has a bottle neck of some sorts.
Anonymous
a b U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 6:18:47 PM

i think you will see a little bottleneck because new series od dx 11 cards will use all that power of quad cores that has multiple threads like core i7. also new games will be optimized for quad cores like gta 4.
a c 236 U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 6:33:50 PM

Quote:
also new games will be optimized for quad cores like gta 4.


gta4 is not optimized to run on the PC, in fact its a crap port (not calling the game crap) that was not optimized to run on the PC hence the high hardware requirements. Games like FEAR 2, Fallout 3, Mass Effect, and others have been optimized to run on the PC. You can run those games on the highest level with a E8400 & 8800GT and have better graphics then their console cousins. Running GTA4 on the same PC hardware, you get the same level or below graphics then the console version.




July 9, 2009 6:36:13 PM

Quote:
i think you will see a little bottleneck because new series od dx 11 cards will use all that power of quad cores that has multiple threads like core i7. also new games will be optimized for quad cores like gta 4.



I don't think any bottlenecking with E8400 will be significant with single GPUs. I'm fairly sure an overclocked E8400 can keep up with a fast single GPU, right?

But i'd like to read more opinions on this.

EDIT: And yes, GTA IV is not a very good example. Because since I patched tio version 1.3 the game just flies on my E8400.
a b U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 6:56:24 PM

Some definitions of bottleneck specify it as a "severe" limitting component. I usually use the term to refer to any reduction in overall performance due to the limitting effect of a single component. In system designs at work we usually refer to a bottleneck as the slowest component in any system, regardless of its level of restriction (it is still the neck of the bottle afterall), and thus try to balance things from a cost/performance stand point.

As such every system has a bottleneck to some degree, it is only a real big problem in the most extreme cases.

Many people will reserve the term bottleneck to describe the point when the restriction results in effectively zero scaling. Thus no matter what GPU you get there will be absolutely no increase in performance because of the CPU. This is common to all games at ultra low settings, but nearly impossible to attain at any moddest resolution (without going all silly and down clocking the cpu to 10% or something :)  ).

At any rate, it is a pretty subjective term, open for interpretation, and the level of a bottleneck that will be worth worrying about is something that varries greatly from user to user. It is really only important from a cost benefit perspective to 99% of users. This of course assuming a stupid level of system balance is not attempted. (such as using a pcie socket 939 board with a single core athlon 64 and a gtx 295)

If you use wiki as a source half of the definitions stupulate "severe" the other half do not. So to each thier own. Being a metaphore refering to a limiting component and not really technical term it is very much to each their own. Also yes, at any time anyone from this page can change the wiki page to read severe or not as there are almost no references in any of the definitions :D .
July 9, 2009 7:42:58 PM

daedalus685 said:
Some definitions of bottleneck specify it as a "severe" limitting component. I usually use the term to refer to any reduction in overall performance due to the limitting effect of a single component. In system designs at work we usually refer to a bottleneck as the slowest component in any system, regardless of its level of restriction (it is still the neck of the bottle afterall), and thus try to balance things from a cost/performance stand point.

As such every system has a bottleneck to some degree, it is only a real big problem in the most extreme cases.

Many people will reserve the term bottleneck to describe the point when the restriction results in effectively zero scaling. Thus no matter what GPU you get there will be absolutely no increase in performance because of the CPU. This is common to all games at ultra low settings, but nearly impossible to attain at any moddest resolution (without going all silly and down clocking the cpu to 10% or something :)  ).

At any rate, it is a pretty subjective term, open for interpretation, and the level of a bottleneck that will be worth worrying about is something that varries greatly from user to user. It is really only important from a cost benefit perspective to 99% of users. This of course assuming a stupid level of system balance is not attempted. (such as using a pcie socket 939 board with a single core athlon 64 and a gtx 295)

If you use wiki as a source half of the definitions stupulate "severe" the other half do not. So to each thier own. Being a metaphore refering to a limiting component and not really technical term it is very much to each their own. Also yes, at any time anyone from this page can change the wiki page to read severe or not as there are almost no references in any of the definitions :D .



That was actually enlightening towards knowing what a bottleneck is, but didn't really answer my question :pt1cable: 
a b U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 8:19:43 PM

Ya sorry, the answer is no. lol

You should not have to worry about a serious hit to GPU scaling for a least another generation of cards. Though there is always that slim chance the next series of cards will be mindlessly mroe powerful than we assume.. :) 
a c 130 U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 8:37:18 PM

@ daedalus685,

Just FYI Microsoft defines a bottleneck as when the runqueue exceeds cpu_count. Thats a real enough technical term for me.
Not that it matters we all seem to agree what it means in the real world.

Mactronix :) 
a b U Graphics card
July 9, 2009 8:50:57 PM

Aye, I'm sure it is used in certain circles to actually refer to something specific. Not any of the ones I happen to be involved in though :) . From a purely data aquisition standpoint we use the term as liberally as hello.. lol. Afterall, we have to apply it to more than just the CPU, and it seems to be everyone's favourite word.
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2009 1:17:48 AM

Heres your bottlenecks


a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2009 2:31:29 AM

Thank you jay... lol

Though those bottle are just neck, so they are pretty much a perfectly balanced system :p 
a c 236 U Graphics card
July 10, 2009 2:42:43 AM

daedalus685 said:
Thank you jay... lol

Though those bottle are just neck, so they are pretty much a perfectly balanced system :p 


not true! While the middle and last glass are amber glass that offer protection form ultraviolet radiation, the first glass is a clear glass creating a bottle neck of light resulting in lower FPS in Crysis on the gamer settings....or possibly by drinking the contents of the beer bottles while playing. :D 
a b U Graphics card
July 10, 2009 2:51:03 AM

To be fair the absorptive filter properties of coloured glass can vary wildly outside of near visual (where the colour obviously shows the transmission) :) 

Crown glass will block UV, regardless of colour.
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