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PC Problems video editing

Last response: in Components
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September 22, 2009 8:54:34 PM

Hi Everyone, I need some help please!
I have a PC (Advent 9404) Windows XP Home Edition Service Pack 3

CPU Intel® Pentium® 4 650 Prescott (3.4 Ghz)

Memory 1024 MB DDR RAM - (2x 512 MB - PC3200)

Motherboard MS 7046

Hard Drive Seagate ST3200822AS 200GB SATA

Hard Drive #2 Seagate ST3200822AS 200GB SATA

CD / DVD Drive Artec DHM-1648S 16X DVD-ROM

CD / DVD Drive Pioneer DVR-109DB DVDRW

Floppy Drive Floppy disk drive

Modem Modem/Analogue TV tuner CTX918

Video / Graphics Card ATI Radeon X700 Pro 128MB PCI-Express

Network Card Creatix 405 PCI 802.11g wireless

Network Card VIA Rhine III VT6105

Sound Card Realtek High Definition Audio (Azalia)

Remote PowerCinema remote control

Disassembly Advent AIRXL case information

Ports Advent T9X04 series connector guide

I have bought a Video Camcorder Canon HD HG 20 which came with Pixela Imagemixer 3.2 SE
but my PC can not handle it, It keeps crashing.
Pixela ask for system conf for full use to be as follows:

CPU Microsoft® Windows® XP
Microsoft® Windows Vista®

Intel® Pentium® D 3.0GHz or higher
Intel® Core™ 2 Duo 2.13GHz or higher
MXP mode (Recording mode): Intel® Core™ 2 Duo 2.33GHz or higher

* Operation is not guaranteed when using over-clocked CPUs.
Memory Microsoft® Windows® XP : 1GB or higher
Microsoft® Windows Vista® : 2GB or higher

Graphics 1280×1024 pixels or more
32 bit or more
Intel G965 (onboard VGA) or higher

My question is: What do I need to upgrade in my PC to use the video editing Pixela?
If the Graphic card needs upgrading which is going to be right replacement?
Do I need more memory? Do I need a couple of Gigas added?

Please any help will be great!!!!!!

More about : problems video editing

September 22, 2009 9:42:38 PM

LOL, you got a HD camcorder and you expect that piece of crap PC to work.

You need a new PC preferably onw tih 4G or more rqam and a quad core. Anything less just aint gonna cut the mustard for HD.
Anonymous
September 23, 2009 4:16:37 PM

Video editing is the most processor intensive application you are likely to use. While the prior writer was not helpful, he is correct that you are running a low end PC for video editing. But, folks were editing HD movies well before quad core PCs were available and we did not go up in smoke. We just took our time:-)

In addition, the software I have seen that is free is usually not very good either. I have a similar PC with more RAM and while the editing is slower than on new systems, it should work without blue screens or program aborts, if that is what you are getting. Not familiar with the Pixela software (I use Adobe Premier Elements) and that can give trouble as well), but you might be better off with a video editing forum rather than a hardware forum. Another hint, store all your video files on a different disk from the OS, that will help keep frame rates up and prevent frame drops when you are downloading from the camera.

All the low priced editing software has bugs and incompatibilities that will drive you nuts. Just visit any of the forums of any of the editing software makers. The expensive stuff I am not familiar with.

Check out the various reviews of editing software and jump in with some evaluation copies of the best ones. Sony and Adobe seem to always rate high. I would stay away from Pinnacle, as their products have given me nothing but trouble, but they are still in business.

Daship, give the guy a break, he was asking for advice, not a judgement on his hardware. Not every problem need be solved by a new PC.
Related resources
September 23, 2009 4:51:13 PM

Quote:
Video editing is the most processor intensive application you are likely to use. While the prior writer was not helpful, he is correct that you are running a low end PC for video editing. But, folks were editing HD movies well before quad core PCs were available and we did not go up in smoke. We just took our time:-)

In addition, the software I have seen that is free is usually not very good either. I have a similar PC with more RAM and while the editing is slower than on new systems, it should work without blue screens or program aborts, if that is what you are getting. Not familiar with the Pixela software (I use Adobe Premier Elements) and that can give trouble as well), but you might be better off with a video editing forum rather than a hardware forum. Another hint, store all your video files on a different disk from the OS, that will help keep frame rates up and prevent frame drops when you are downloading from the camera.

All the low priced editing software has bugs and incompatibilities that will drive you nuts. Just visit any of the forums of any of the editing software makers. The expensive stuff I am not familiar with.

Check out the various reviews of editing software and jump in with some evaluation copies of the best ones. Sony and Adobe seem to always rate high. I would stay away from Pinnacle, as their products have given me nothing but trouble, but they are still in business.

Daship, give the guy a break, he was asking for advice, not a judgement on his hardware. Not every problem need be solved by a new PC.


Dear dwknapp
Thank you very much for the time you took to give me advice, it is really well appreciated!
I am going to look to another type of software, maybe Adobe Premier Elements it is a good alternative?
Also I think I going to add some RAM memory to the PC maybe 2 Giga!

Thanks again : )
Anonymous
September 23, 2009 6:37:06 PM

The ram will help with everything, but if you are getting some sort of aborts, it probably won't help. Video editing is very closely tied into video drivers and CPU speed. Sometimes I think it is a wonder it works at all. Problems with video card drivers can certainly lead to the BSD sort of crash. When you start your editing, do short, simple projects first to see if the basics work. Save often!!! Add more fancy transitions and longer projects only after you think the system will be stable. It is really annoying to get to the render step, kick off a several hour process and then have it die at the end. Other things to check are the audio synchronization with the video. It is easy for the software to not get the lips in sync with the movement.

For a start, try the following links -

http://www.videohelp.com

http://www.dvd-creators.net/index.html

There are plenty of others as well.
September 23, 2009 7:24:05 PM

alberto47 said:
Dear dwknapp
Thank you very much for the time you took to give me advice, it is really well appreciated!
I am going to look to another type of software, maybe Adobe Premier Elements it is a good alternative?
Also I think I going to add some RAM memory to the PC maybe 2 Giga!

Thanks again : )


The additional RAM would help the program from thrashing on the hdisk, but generally when editing HD video you'd need at least a really speedy dual-core. My friend tried editing some HD video on a Core 2, 2.6GHz and it was still slow.
September 23, 2009 7:57:56 PM

Quote:
The ram will help with everything, but if you are getting some sort of aborts, it probably won't help. Video editing is very closely tied into video drivers and CPU speed. Sometimes I think it is a wonder it works at all. Problems with video card drivers can certainly lead to the BSD sort of crash. When you start your editing, do short, simple projects first to see if the basics work. Save often!!! Add more fancy transitions and longer projects only after you think the system will be stable. It is really annoying to get to the render step, kick off a several hour process and then have it die at the end. Other things to check are the audio synchronization with the video. It is easy for the software to not get the lips in sync with the movement.

For a start, try the following links -

http://www.videohelp.com

http://www.dvd-creators.net/index.html

There are plenty of others as well.



Thank again dwknapp I am going to try those forums!!!!
: )
!