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Inspiron 3500 needs an icepack to start

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 19, 2004 12:49:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

My Dell Inspiron 3500 laptop began to stall out after shorter and
shorter times. And the bottom got hotter, too. I have discovered
that if I set the machine on an ice pack, it will start up and run for
a couple of minutes before stalling out. After that it won't start
until the next day, even with the ice pack. And then it will again
stall out after a couple of minutes.

Help!

Mel Levine
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 19, 2004 12:50:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Melvin Levine wrote:
> My Dell Inspiron 3500 laptop began to stall out after shorter and
> shorter times. And the bottom got hotter, too. I have discovered
> that if I set the machine on an ice pack, it will start up and run for
> a couple of minutes before stalling out. After that it won't start
> until the next day, even with the ice pack. And then it will again
> stall out after a couple of minutes.
>
> Help!
>
> Mel Levine

The fan should start at boot for a short time. Can you note if it is
operating at all? You might try a can of dust remover, available at any
computer store to blow through all of the cooling channels. It might be
something altogether different. Can it boot from a Win9x boot disk?
Check the voltage from the power adapter also.

Q
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 19, 2004 9:02:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> My Dell Inspiron 3500 laptop began to stall out after shorter and
> shorter times. And the bottom got hotter, too. I have discovered
> that if I set the machine on an ice pack, it will start up and run for
> a couple of minutes before stalling out. After that it won't start
> until the next day, even with the ice pack. And then it will again
> stall out after a couple of minutes.

You are not alone with this problem

I purchased summer 2000 a Gericom Silver Seraph
aka Compal 30T5
aka Dell 3500

I had more and more thermical problems with this notebook.
Just before I replaced it with my new Acer,
it was only possible to work in the cold

http://notebook.pege.org/2003/thermische-probleme.htm
http://notebook.pege.org/2003/fehlertest-temperatur.htm

Sorry, only German,
but the pictures are showing the problem ;-)


--
Roland Mösl
http://www.pege.org Clear targets for a confused civilization
http://web-design-suite.com Web Design starts at the search engine
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 20, 2004 1:16:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Mon, 19 Apr 2004 08:15:45 -0600, "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net>
wrote:

>Melvin Levine wrote:
>> My Dell Inspiron 3500 laptop began to stall out after shorter and
>> shorter times. And the bottom got hotter, too. I have discovered
>> that if I set the machine on an ice pack, it will start up and run for
>> a couple of minutes before stalling out. After that it won't start
>> until the next day, even with the ice pack. And then it will again
>> stall out after a couple of minutes.
>>
>> Help!
>>
>> Mel Levine
>
>The fan should start at boot for a short time. Can you note if it is
>operating at all? You might try a can of dust remover, available at any
>computer store to blow through all of the cooling channels. It might be
>something altogether different. Can it boot from a Win9x boot disk?
>Check the voltage from the power adapter also.
>
>Q
>
Thanks for your suggestions. However, the fan does run even tho the
machine doesn't boot up. And it won't boot up with a Win98 boot
diskette. The charger voltage is ok. I'd be glad for more
suggestions, tho.

Mel
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 20, 2004 1:22:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Mon, 19 Apr 2004 17:02:35 +0200, Roland Mösl <founder@pege.org>
wrote:

>> My Dell Inspiron 3500 laptop began to stall out after shorter and
>> shorter times. And the bottom got hotter, too. I have discovered
>> that if I set the machine on an ice pack, it will start up and run for
>> a couple of minutes before stalling out. After that it won't start
>> until the next day, even with the ice pack. And then it will again
>> stall out after a couple of minutes.
>
>You are not alone with this problem
>
>I purchased summer 2000 a Gericom Silver Seraph
>aka Compal 30T5
>aka Dell 3500
>
>I had more and more thermical problems with this notebook.
>Just before I replaced it with my new Acer,
>it was only possible to work in the cold
>
>http://notebook.pege.org/2003/thermische-probleme.htm
>http://notebook.pege.org/2003/fehlertest-temperatur.htm
>
>Sorry, only German,
>but the pictures are showing the problem ;-)

I'm upset that my Inspiron doesn't work, but still enlghtened (and
amused) by your response. I haven't tried to see if the machine
works in my refrigerator, but in any case there isn't enough room in
the refrigerator for me and the computer.

Many thanks for your heartening response.

Mel
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 23, 2004 12:46:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Problem with your Inspiron 3500, which is really a Compal TS30T, is that it
is structurally weak (it flexes and bents - esp with the CD/floppy and
battery removed), and that over time, it's cpu module, even though it's
screwed down, becomes partially unseated and causes the problem that
you're encountering. It's underneath the keyboard, and you'll need to
remove the KB (held in by 3 screws at the bottom), lift up the KB, then
remove the CPU heat sink (1 screw), then remove the cpu screws (2), reseat
the darn thing, then reverse the process.

Shouldn't be too hard...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 24, 2004 10:17:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 20:46:15 -0400, "bobchang"
<totallyincorrect@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Problem with your Inspiron 3500, which is really a Compal TS30T, is that it
>is structurally weak (it flexes and bents - esp with the CD/floppy and
>battery removed), and that over time, it's cpu module, even though it's
>screwed down, becomes partially unseated and causes the problem that
>you're encountering. It's underneath the keyboard, and you'll need to
>remove the KB (held in by 3 screws at the bottom), lift up the KB, then
>remove the CPU heat sink (1 screw), then remove the cpu screws (2), reseat
>the darn thing, then reverse the process.
>
>Shouldn't be too hard...
>
Dear Bobchang,
I'm overcome with admiration and gratitude for you and your
advice. After I followed your instructions, the Inspiron 3500 is now
working again.

Many many thanks.

Mel Levine
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 24, 2004 11:08:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Wow! I'm impressed - not by me, of course, but that you actually done it.
Wiggling the keyboard outta the system must've been fun, LOL!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 25, 2004 12:36:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> Wow! I'm impressed - not by me, of course, but that you actually done it.
> Wiggling the keyboard outta the system must've been fun, LOL!

Tried the same last year, but did not help my old Gericom Silver Seraph


--
Roland Mösl
http://www.pege.org Clear targets for a confused civilization
http://web-design-suite.com Web Design starts at the search engine
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 25, 2004 3:09:53 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Tried the same last year, but did not help my old Gericom Silver Seraph"

That's too bad. I wanted to note that because these units are so ...
flexible, and when I say flexible I'm referring to the screen hinges (made
of cast iron) being bolted onto the plastic casing only. So every time
you open the screen lid, you're pitching metal against plastic and you're
tugging and torquing the entire lower body of the laptop along in the
direction of the screen - causing the motherboard to shift and bent (ever
so slightly) and moan and groan. Sooner or later, there will be only two
outcomes in this battle: (1) the hinges will break (and divorce) the
plastics surrounding it, or (2) the motherboard will stop moaning and ...
leave!

The icepack thing happened to work because putting the icepack underneath
the cpu (the hot portion) helped push the motherboard up into the cpu -
that'll be my guess. I guess you can also use a rock instead of an
icepack...

I'm suspicious of slim laptops (and this one was the slimmest during its
days) - and especially the slim ones with many swappable parts (batteries,
dvd/cd-rom, fdd and what not). They lack the overall structural rigidity
and balance that'll affect the overall reliability over time. Structural
strength is everything in a notebook, and unfortunately, notebooks with
better structural support tend to be a little thicker and weighs a bit
more and are hence harder to sell. But that's just me... :) 
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 8, 2004 3:20:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"bobchang" <totallyincorrect@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<9bbbecc005b5c9529d27e917c92e7220@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com>...
> That's too bad. I wanted to note that because these units are so ...
> flexible, and when I say flexible I'm referring to the screen hinges (made
> of cast iron) being bolted onto the plastic casing only. So every time
> you open the screen lid, you're pitching metal against plastic and you're
> tugging and torquing the entire lower body of the laptop along in the
> direction of the screen - causing the motherboard to shift and bent (ever
> so slightly) and moan and groan. Sooner or later, there will be only two
> outcomes in this battle: (1) the hinges will break (and divorce) the
> plastics surrounding it, or (2) the motherboard will stop moaning and ...
> leave!

You've just described my Inspiron 8100, and moreso the 7500 that
preceeded it. The 7500 lost its screen 3 or so times (pig-iron
"hinges" shattering with a sideways glance), resulting in Dell finally
giving up and replacing it with an 8100. As of today, the 8100 is a
pile of scrap iron, due to the same PATHETIC construction. This time
the screen is still mounted (though threatening), but the power board
and video card no longer will stay seated to the motherboard, even
after complete disassembly and re-engineering of several mounting
points. No Das Boot. Thus I'm in the market for a NON-DELL
replacement (while suffering through a borrowed 3500,
366MHz/96MB/1024x768 after 1.2GHz/512MB/1600x1200).

To anyone considering buying a Dell "laptop", please keep in mind my
experiences with their hardware, and service. I don't even want to
*start* on how ridiculously bad their service has been.
Must...not....explode......head.......

- Omega
!