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Leak Testing

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June 24, 2011 12:20:50 PM

Hello, it's 1:15pm now and I have started leak testing. Would it be ok if I left it until 8pm then put everything back together. Or should I leave it over night, it's only a simple loop cooling the cpu.

Thanks

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a c 324 K Overclocking
June 24, 2011 1:23:44 PM

What do you mean, leave it until 8pm...leave it leak testing? Are you testing outside your case? Just remember, when you pull your loop apart and put it back, you'll need to leak test....again.
June 24, 2011 1:40:34 PM

rubix_1011 said:
What do you mean, leave it until 8pm...leave it leak testing? Are you testing outside your case? Just remember, when you pull your loop apart and put it back, you'll need to leak test....again.


It's outside the case. I'm going to put it back in the case without taking it apart, I have a haf x so it's big enough to squeeze everything back in. So if this is my only leak test should I how long should I leave it with out going overkill.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
June 24, 2011 1:42:35 PM

Sounds good...you might want to give it 15 mins of testing once you get it in, just in case any tubing or fittings came loose. Shouldn't be too big of a deal or hassle...just want to make sure it doesn't leak in the final working locations...the most important places where it shouldn't leak. :) 
a c 286 K Overclocking
June 24, 2011 1:58:34 PM

Just install the loop inside your case and cover all the components with cloths for avoid issues.
a b K Overclocking
June 24, 2011 2:06:52 PM

Most guides recommend 24 hours of leak testing prior to installation in the case with live components, assuming you can put the loop inside the case without taking it apart.
a c 324 K Overclocking
June 24, 2011 2:10:49 PM

I say at least 6-8, but you can go 4 or so if you really know what you are doing. 8-12 is a good rule for most people, though...24 seems a little excessive. You're going to know long before then if you have a leak.
June 28, 2011 11:04:51 AM

Ok, simply put: first test inside the case NOT OUTSIDE. the reason is 100% of the times the position of the elements will differ and even that small change can leak.
Second, to be safe, plug to the PSU only the pump, nothing more, and start the leak test. To jump start your PSU u can use a clip connecting the green and black wire in the 24 pin connector of the PSU (search google if you dont know how).
The leak test is quite simple: you wait watching it for about 20 minutes, and then pass some toilet paper at each connection to see if by then it leaked. Dont panic if it does, as all your hardware is not powered on by the PSU.

Once you done that and there is no leak, leave it as long as you can:
5 hours is bare minimum according to any decent guide. 24 hours is considered safe, and 48 is considetared Leak-proof. This is becouse if the leak is hair thin small, you might not notice it, and thats enought to fry your computer.

Also, another reason why you should test it in the case: once you start connecting everything you might accidentally pull something off.
If you have any more questions id be glad to help.
June 28, 2011 11:08:03 AM

I forgot 1 important thing: only jump start your PSu if its a decent brand. Some cheap brands are unable to produce a small amount of energy and they will differ their full power to heat, and that could fry your PSU ( i asume since you water cooling your PSU is good but better safe than sry).
a b K Overclocking
June 28, 2011 12:12:47 PM

cats_Paw said:
Ok, simply put: first test inside the case NOT OUTSIDE. the reason is 100% of the times the position of the elements will differ and even that small change can leak.
Second, to be safe, plug to the PSU only the pump, nothing more, and start the leak test. To jump start your PSU u can use a clip connecting the green and black wire in the 24 pin connector of the PSU (search google if you dont know how).
The leak test is quite simple: you wait watching it for about 20 minutes, and then pass some toilet paper at each connection to see if by then it leaked. Dont panic if it does, as all your hardware is not powered on by the PSU.

Once you done that and there is no leak, leave it as long as you can:
5 hours is bare minimum according to any decent guide. 24 hours is considered safe, and 48 is considetared Leak-proof. This is becouse if the leak is hair thin small, you might not notice it, and thats enought to fry your computer.

Also, another reason why you should test it in the case: once you start connecting everything you might accidentally pull something off.
If you have any more questions id be glad to help.

My loop is on a custom bench and is designed to be pulled and set in a drawer or on a shelf until needed again, I'm not refilling and retesting everytime.

Confidence in your abilities and knowing your components are good should be more of a determining factor than the clock.
a c 324 K Overclocking
June 28, 2011 1:42:07 PM

Leak testing outside the case is a decent idea for a beginner simply because it helps build their confidence that they won't ruin anything, even if there is a leak. Then, you need to make sure you leak test inside the case after that to ensure there aren't any leaks due to fittings and tubing being moved.

Personally, I rarely leak check anymore. The only time I jumper my PSU is when I'm filling/priming my loop. I've done it so many times that I could do it in my sleep...but I wouldn't recommend anyone else doing that...especially a beginner.
July 4, 2011 6:28:44 PM

Another tip is to use air pressure and a very accurate pressure guage pump up your system to 21 psi 1.5 atm and see if the pressure falls back any - air is a smaller molucule than H2o so if it falls back, you got a possible leak!!
!