Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Effect of disabling onboard graphic

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
December 22, 2009 7:39:08 AM

Hi,

I'm building a system for my son who plays regular 3D games like NFS, FIFA, Call of Duty ...

While searching for a AMD NB790/SB750 motherboard I came across ASUS M4A78-E which seems to be quite up to date and has a reasonable price tag, but with one problem: it has an onboard GPU which I don't need!

Would there be any problem (performance-wise or otherwise) to disable the onboard GPU and use a discreet card like ATI HD 4770 instead?

Thanks in advance
SAFAI

P.S. I understand that I'm wasting the onboard GPU, (correct me if I'm wrong) but it seems if I want to use the better AMD NB790/SB750 chipset at under $150 I have no other choice.
a c 156 V Motherboard
December 22, 2009 7:50:56 AM

safai said:

Would there be any problem (performance-wise or otherwise) to disable the onboard GPU and use a discreet card like ATI HD 4770 instead?

No. It will improve graphics.

There's a very good chance that you do not need to do anything. Many of the modern motherboards automatically deactivate the onboard graphics when they detect the presence of a discrete graphics card.
December 22, 2009 2:24:03 PM

Thanks a lot jsc and zipzoomflyhigh for the comments. Now I understand which direction to take.

May I have your comments on this one: ASUS M4A79XTD EVO AM3 AMD 790X ATX ? It seems to be reasonably priced and fully AM3 compliant, and has CrossFire for adding an additional video card later on.

Would ATI HD4770 be OK for being used in the CrossFire mode with this motherboard? Or it is better to get an HD48XX card?

Thanks again

SAFAI

Related resources
a b V Motherboard
December 22, 2009 8:29:41 PM

To be honest, I'd avoid the 4770. It's a pretty mediocre card for gaming by today's standards.

If you get an AM3 chip, the 4870 or 4890 is better matched to its power. You might even consider a 5770 if you're planning on keeping the machine for a few years, since it had DirectX 11 and the 4xxx cards don't.
December 23, 2009 11:38:33 AM

capt_taco said:
To be honest, I'd avoid the 4770. It's a pretty mediocre card for gaming by today's standards.

If you get an AM3 chip, the 4870 or 4890 is better matched to its power. You might even consider a 5770 if you're planning on keeping the machine for a few years, since it had DirectX 11 and the 4xxx cards don't.



Thanks a lot capt_taco. I will go for 48XX since 5770 is really beyond my budget.

Thank you all

Cheers
December 27, 2009 9:38:23 AM

Quote:
Well the 48XX series is faster than the 4770 But it is also older, hotter technology that uses more power. The 48XX series are 55nm. They are also discontinued.

The 4770 is about almost as fast as a 4850 but it's a newer 40nm design, which runs cooler and uses less power. A pair of 4770's would be a decent setup but I dont know if you would even be able to find any 47xx or 48xx in a year or so.

If you plan on just getting a newer card in a year or two instead of crossfiring, then the 4870 1GB is the best deal going. The GTX260 is also very good.
Seriously I recommend always getting the fastest single card you can afford rather than crossfiring older cards together. It creates more heat and likely you'll need a better power supply to add another card so I would seriously reconsider the crossfire and save some money by going with the 785G.


Thanks a lot

I will keep in mind your advice

Cheers
!