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Charging laptop from car DC converter

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 20, 2004 12:31:30 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi there,

I don't have much knowledge on electronics and I'd really appreciate
your advice on this. I came across one of those Car DC converters that
outputs 800mA at voltages in multiples of 1.5V up to 12V (to be used
for CD players, portable TVs, etc) recently. I am hoping to use it to
charge my laptop battery on long drives, but unfortunately my laptop
power supply is rates at 19.5V and 3A.

Now presumably this means that I can't take out my battery and expect
the laptop to work on the output from the DC converter, but does it
mean that I won't be able to charge the battery from the 12V output?
If I plug the output in to my laptop (laptop off), will it damage my
battery, or will it in fact charge it?

Thanks in advance.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 20, 2004 1:46:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Jack Torrance" <portoy40@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e1617ba.0404200731.265cad91@posting.google.com...
> Hi there,
>
> I don't have much knowledge on electronics and I'd really appreciate
> your advice on this. I came across one of those Car DC converters that
> outputs 800mA at voltages in multiples of 1.5V up to 12V (to be used
> for CD players, portable TVs, etc) recently. I am hoping to use it to
> charge my laptop battery on long drives, but unfortunately my laptop
> power supply is rates at 19.5V and 3A.
>
> Now presumably this means that I can't take out my battery and expect
> the laptop to work on the output from the DC converter,

That is right.

but does it
> mean that I won't be able to charge the battery from the 12V output?

That is right. you can't charge your battery with the converter's output.

> If I plug the output in to my laptop (laptop off), will it damage my
> battery, or will it in fact charge it?

Damage is quite likely. As Jeff Norton has suggested, forget the DC
converter and get a power inverter instead. This will allow you to use your
regular laptop charger. Just make sure the power inverter has sufficient
wattage to run your laptop charger. 150 watts ought to be fine - it works
for my thinkpad's charger.

>
> Thanks in advance.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 20, 2004 8:01:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Jack Torrance" <portoy40@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e1617ba.0404200731.265cad91@posting.google.com...
| Hi there,
|
| I don't have much knowledge on electronics and I'd really appreciate
| your advice on this. I came across one of those Car DC converters that
| outputs 800mA at voltages in multiples of 1.5V up to 12V (to be used
| for CD players, portable TVs, etc) recently. I am hoping to use it to
| charge my laptop battery on long drives, but unfortunately my laptop
| power supply is rates at 19.5V and 3A.
|
| Now presumably this means that I can't take out my battery and expect
| the laptop to work on the output from the DC converter, but does it
| mean that I won't be able to charge the battery from the 12V output?
| If I plug the output in to my laptop (laptop off), will it damage my
| battery, or will it in fact charge it?
|
| Thanks in advance.


Hi Jack -

From a post by Quaoar -

| Find a power inverter - it converts auto DC to AC at 110V.
| 300W inverters can be had for not much $$ at computer
| stores and auto supply stores. The inverter will provide
| filtering for the noisy auto DC power. You will plug in your
| AC adapter to the inverter.
|
| Q

You gain the added benefit that you'd be able to run your laptop in your car
using it's AC adaptor with plenty of power (as well as being able to charge
the battery when the laptop is not running).

Jef
Related resources
April 21, 2004 12:15:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

you can get a power inverter from Pep boys for about 30 dollars
400 watt, that is what I did and have no problems
"Jack Torrance" <portoy40@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e1617ba.0404200731.265cad91@posting.google.com...
> Hi there,
>
> I don't have much knowledge on electronics and I'd really appreciate
> your advice on this. I came across one of those Car DC converters that
> outputs 800mA at voltages in multiples of 1.5V up to 12V (to be used
> for CD players, portable TVs, etc) recently. I am hoping to use it to
> charge my laptop battery on long drives, but unfortunately my laptop
> power supply is rates at 19.5V and 3A.
>
> Now presumably this means that I can't take out my battery and expect
> the laptop to work on the output from the DC converter, but does it
> mean that I won't be able to charge the battery from the 12V output?
> If I plug the output in to my laptop (laptop off), will it damage my
> battery, or will it in fact charge it?
>
> Thanks in advance.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 21, 2004 5:37:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Jack,

Get a DC converter - specifically made - for laptops. Either from the mfgr of
your laptop or Targus. Using anything else is foolish. If you want to run a
radio or shaver, use an inverter. You want to run a computer, get something
made for electronics.

TJ

Jack Torrance wrote:
>
> Hi there,
>
> I don't have much knowledge on electronics and I'd really appreciate
> your advice on this. I came across one of those Car DC converters that
> outputs 800mA at voltages in multiples of 1.5V up to 12V (to be used
> for CD players, portable TVs, etc) recently. I am hoping to use it to
> charge my laptop battery on long drives, but unfortunately my laptop
> power supply is rates at 19.5V and 3A.
>
> Now presumably this means that I can't take out my battery and expect
> the laptop to work on the output from the DC converter, but does it
> mean that I won't be able to charge the battery from the 12V output?
> If I plug the output in to my laptop (laptop off), will it damage my
> battery, or will it in fact charge it?
>
> Thanks in advance.

--
=========================================================================
The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 21, 2004 5:37:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote in message
news:4085D045.21A85074@cableaz.com...
> Jack,
>
> Get a DC converter - specifically made - for laptops. Either from the
mfgr of
> your laptop or Targus. Using anything else is foolish. If you want to
run a
> radio or shaver, use an inverter. You want to run a computer, get
something
> made for electronics.
>

What a crock! Last time I checked, a radio WAS an electronic device. Laptop
chargers work fine with inverters and you get to use the laptop charger
designed for your laptop without spending a small fortune on the DC
converter sold by the manufacturer.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 21, 2004 6:58:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Ian S. wrote:

> "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote in message
> news:4085D045.21A85074@cableaz.com...
>
>>Jack,
>>
>>Get a DC converter - specifically made - for laptops. Either from the
>
> mfgr of
>
>>your laptop or Targus. Using anything else is foolish. If you want to
>
> run a
>
>>radio or shaver, use an inverter. You want to run a computer, get
>
> something
>
>>made for electronics.
>>
>
>
> What a crock! Last time I checked, a radio WAS an electronic device. Laptop
> chargers work fine with inverters and you get to use the laptop charger
> designed for your laptop without spending a small fortune on the DC
> converter sold by the manufacturer.
>
>
Wait a minute, here. Although Capt. Wild is a little too prone to
selling IBM products (this time he advertises converter specifically
made for laptops, which is not necessary), he has a point here and let
us clarify something. The way I understand things (and I may be wrong),
inverters are only meant for devices that use only a motor or resistors.
The reason is, their output is NOT true alternative current but
successions of + and - DC (or close to DC) pulses (this is the reason
they are called inverters). They work great on lots of devices but using
them on something that converts AC to DC, or more generally anything
electronic is looking for bad, very bad trouble: failure can be very
quick if not immediate.

What you need is a DC to AC converter which will convert the AC into
close to a true AC voltage and therefore will not harm the electronics
of your powersupply. They can be found for as little as 50.00$ in any
Compusa or Radioshack. They will provide 110 V AC suitable for any use.
Unless you intend to use such converter for other purposes, you do not
need more than 75w. They do not need to be specifically made for laptops
(assuming such things exist: that would probably be just an excuse to
overprice the device) lots of people use such devices for radios, tv,
and any other electronic (or regular) device. I would anyway advise to
stick to well known brands like APC.

Remember: inverters are meant to be used only for devices that DO NOT
have electronics (read the notice, they normally make this very clear).
Indeed, those devices are cheaper than converters but who wants to take
chances to save at best 30$ ?


--
John Doue
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 21, 2004 6:58:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"John Doue" <notwobe@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Irlhc.6$wN1.5@read3.inet.fi...
> Ian S. wrote:
>
> > "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote in message
> > news:4085D045.21A85074@cableaz.com...
> >
> >>Jack,
> >>
> >>Get a DC converter - specifically made - for laptops. Either from the
> >
> > mfgr of
> >
> >>your laptop or Targus. Using anything else is foolish. If you want to
> >
> > run a
> >
> >>radio or shaver, use an inverter. You want to run a computer, get
> >
> > something
> >
> >>made for electronics.
> >>
> >
> >
> > What a crock! Last time I checked, a radio WAS an electronic device.
Laptop
> > chargers work fine with inverters and you get to use the laptop charger
> > designed for your laptop without spending a small fortune on the DC
> > converter sold by the manufacturer.
> >
> >
> Wait a minute, here. Although Capt. Wild is a little too prone to
> selling IBM products (this time he advertises converter specifically
> made for laptops, which is not necessary), he has a point here and let
> us clarify something. The way I understand things (and I may be wrong),
> inverters are only meant for devices that use only a motor or resistors.
> The reason is, their output is NOT true alternative current but
> successions of + and - DC (or close to DC) pulses (this is the reason
> they are called inverters). They work great on lots of devices but using
> them on something that converts AC to DC, or more generally anything
> electronic is looking for bad, very bad trouble: failure can be very
> quick if not immediate.
>
> What you need is a DC to AC converter which will convert the AC into
> close to a true AC voltage and therefore will not harm the electronics
> of your powersupply. They can be found for as little as 50.00$ in any
> Compusa or Radioshack. They will provide 110 V AC suitable for any use.
> Unless you intend to use such converter for other purposes, you do not
> need more than 75w. They do not need to be specifically made for laptops
> (assuming such things exist: that would probably be just an excuse to
> overprice the device) lots of people use such devices for radios, tv,
> and any other electronic (or regular) device. I would anyway advise to
> stick to well known brands like APC.
>
> Remember: inverters are meant to be used only for devices that DO NOT
> have electronics (read the notice, they normally make this very clear).
> Indeed, those devices are cheaper than converters but who wants to take
> chances to save at best 30$ ?
>
>
> --
> John Doue

The ones I'm talking about advertise their use for laptops so I believe you
and I are talking about the same items.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 21, 2004 6:59:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Ian S." wrote:
>
> "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote in message
> news:4085D045.21A85074@cableaz.com...
> > Jack,
> >
> > Get a DC converter - specifically made - for laptops. Either from the
> mfgr of
> > your laptop or Targus. Using anything else is foolish. If you want to
> run a
> > radio or shaver, use an inverter. You want to run a computer, get
> something
> > made for electronics.
> >
>
> What a crock! Last time I checked, a radio WAS an electronic device. Laptop
> chargers work fine with inverters and you get to use the laptop charger
> designed for your laptop without spending a small fortune on the DC
> converter sold by the manufacturer.

Uh-huh, a radio doesnt shutoff when voltages drop. If the mfgr'se version costs
too much, go with Targus. You have a cheap laptop? Get a cheap PS.

TJ, NS2E(12yr ham)
=========================================================================
The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 21, 2004 6:59:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote in message
news:4085E37D.8108FC91@cableaz.com...
> "Ian S." wrote:
> >
> > "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote in message
> > news:4085D045.21A85074@cableaz.com...
> > > Jack,
> > >
> > > Get a DC converter - specifically made - for laptops. Either from the
> > mfgr of
> > > your laptop or Targus. Using anything else is foolish. If you want
to
> > run a
> > > radio or shaver, use an inverter. You want to run a computer, get
> > something
> > > made for electronics.
> > >
> >
> > What a crock! Last time I checked, a radio WAS an electronic device.
Laptop
> > chargers work fine with inverters and you get to use the laptop charger
> > designed for your laptop without spending a small fortune on the DC
> > converter sold by the manufacturer.
>
> Uh-huh, a radio doesnt shutoff when voltages drop.

So a voltage drop is the problem with these car inverters? You know the ones
that advertise using them for your laptop?

If the mfgr'se version costs
> too much, go with Targus. You have a cheap laptop? Get a cheap PS.

My "cheap" Thinkpads work fine on my inverter/converter whatever you want to
call it.

>
> TJ, NS2E(12yr ham)
> =========================================================================
> The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 21, 2004 7:13:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

John Doue wrote:
>
> Ian S. wrote:
>
> > "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote in message
> > news:4085D045.21A85074@cableaz.com...
> >
> >>Jack,
> >>
> >>Get a DC converter - specifically made - for laptops. Either from the
> >
> > mfgr of
> >
> >>your laptop or Targus. Using anything else is foolish. If you want to
> >
> > run a
> >
> >>radio or shaver, use an inverter. You want to run a computer, get
> >
> > something
> >
> >>made for electronics.
> >>
> >
> >
> > What a crock! Last time I checked, a radio WAS an electronic device. Laptop
> > chargers work fine with inverters and you get to use the laptop charger
> > designed for your laptop without spending a small fortune on the DC
> > converter sold by the manufacturer.
> >
> >
> Wait a minute, here. Although Capt. Wild is a little too prone to
> selling IBM products (this time he advertises converter specifically
> made for laptops, which is not necessary), he has a point here and let
> us clarify something. The way I understand things (and I may be wrong),
> inverters are only meant for devices that use only a motor or resistors.
> The reason is, their output is NOT true alternative current but
> successions of + and - DC (or close to DC) pulses (this is the reason
> they are called inverters). They work great on lots of devices but using
> them on something that converts AC to DC, or more generally anything
> electronic is looking for bad, very bad trouble: failure can be very
> quick if not immediate.
>
> What you need is a DC to AC converter which will convert the AC into
> close to a true AC voltage and therefore will not harm the electronics
> of your powersupply. They can be found for as little as 50.00$ in any
> Compusa or Radioshack. They will provide 110 V AC suitable for any use.
> Unless you intend to use such converter for other purposes, you do not
> need more than 75w. They do not need to be specifically made for laptops
> (assuming such things exist: that would probably be just an excuse to
> overprice the device) lots of people use such devices for radios, tv,
> and any other electronic (or regular) device. I would anyway advise to
> stick to well known brands like APC.
>
> Remember: inverters are meant to be used only for devices that DO NOT
> have electronics (read the notice, they normally make this very clear).
> Indeed, those devices are cheaper than converters but who wants to take
> chances to save at best 30$ ?
>
> --
> John Doue

Why, oh why would anyone use a device to change DC, to AC just to have the thing
that plugs in it(the charger) change it back to DC again?

"I think I'm gonna reroute my trip,
I wonder if anybody'd think I flipped..
if I a, ah,
went to L.A.,
via Omaha.."

You guys can buy what you want, and I wish you luck, but is it worth saving $30
or so getting something not specifically made for laptops, not to me it isnt.
Besides, you better check your warranty info before you go plugging your charger
into anything other than a wall outlet.

TJ
=========================================================================
The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.

In one physical model of the universe, the shortest distance between two points
is a straight line . . . in the opposite direction.
!