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Check up on bottle necks.. i7 system

Last response: in Systems
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June 30, 2009 9:24:10 AM

I'm planning to build a i7 system:

XFX HD4890 Black Edition ATI Radeon HD4890, 1024 MB, 256 Bit, PCIe x16 v2.0
Intel® Core i7-920 4x 2666 MHz, 4x 256 kB, 4800 MT/s, Bloomfield
Corsair CMPSU-850TX 850 Watt, ATX12V 2.0, EPS, 8 x, 8 x
Antec Nine Hundred II 3 x, 6 x, ATX, µATX, Mini ITX
DVD-Writer Samsung SH-S222A
GigaByte GA-EX58-UD4P X58, 6.400 MT/s, 3x PCIe x16 v2.0, SLI, Cr, Socket 1366
Western Digital WD1001FALS 1 TB 1.000 GB, 8,9 / 32 / 7200, € 0,09*, Serial ATA/300
Corsair DIMM 6 GB DDR3-1333 Tri-Kit

So my question is: are there any bottlenecks in this build? (or alternatives that would be better for some parts)
June 30, 2009 9:54:58 AM

For the price range of Corsair, you can get a good DDR3 1600MHz RAM easy...
Rest of the specs are very good...
Maybe you would want to include an aftermarket CPU cooler and thermal compound, if you intend to overclock... - Scythe Mugen 2/ Xig Dark knight...
June 30, 2009 11:42:21 AM

The 4890 in crossfire only needs a 600w PSU from the AMD website. So the 850 is a bit overkill. You can save a little by going to the 620 or 750. Add an aftermarket cool as gkay said but I'd stick with the 1333 ram. You won't notice a lick of difference by paying more for the 1600. You could also find a mobo that only has 2 PCIe x16 slots and crossfire can only go 2 deep, not 3. Othewise, looks like a well balanced system.
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June 30, 2009 1:57:25 PM

skora said:
The 4890 in crossfire only needs a 600w PSU from the AMD website. So the 850 is a bit overkill. You can save a little by going to the 620 or 750. Add an aftermarket cool as gkay said but I'd stick with the 1333 ram. You won't notice a lick of difference by paying more for the 1600. You could also find a mobo that only has 2 PCIe x16 slots and crossfire can only go 2 deep, not 3. Othewise, looks like a well balanced system.


Do you know a good mobo with with only 2 PCIe slots?
June 30, 2009 2:32:11 PM

The Gigabyte board you choose is a good board. At most, you could save $40-$50 by stepping down but might not be worth it. I found I mispoke, as it is possible to do tri-fire systems from the hardware side. Software/drivers are not there yet though. Check the combos and get the most out of that. Gigabyte, DFI, Evga, or Asus are my picks to stick with. So to sum up, don't listen to what I said before, the board you choose is fine and if you do want to explore tri-fire in the future, the 850 is good too.

Good job too on doing your homework. Sorry I had a moment of stupidity.
!