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Stock thermal compound vs artic 5?

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October 1, 2009 8:38:13 AM

I just recieved a replacement for my AMD 5600+, which came with a new fan and heatsink, and the heatsink bottom already had some kind of thermal paste applied to it. It looked like it had been applied very professionally, with an evenness spread over the square that suggested to me it was done by a machine at the factory.

Anyway, I decided NOT to use Artic's thermal compund cleaner, followed by applying Artic 5, because it looked like the stock thermal compound was so experctly applied. I went ahead and installed the CPU with the new fan and it runs around 34 degrees C under a moderate load. It idles at around 32 degrees C. I am wondering if it would make much difference if I took it out, removed the stock compound, and applied Artic 5 instead. A friend has one of these CPU's which idles 28 degrees C and runs 32 degrees C under a moderate load.

I am open for any opinions about it. I plan on running 3d apps with this CPU, so I would like to keep it as cool as possible.
a c 159 à CPUs
October 1, 2009 9:37:17 AM

I would leave it alone. You won't notice the difference; temps might actually rise. I've never seen more then 2 degrees difference.
a c 172 à CPUs
October 1, 2009 9:45:24 AM

Leave it alone.

Your temps look good, but it would be better to measure temperatures at full load.

And it is difficult to compare your temperatures with another system. So many variables come into play: ambient temperature, case airflow, fans, even cabling inside the case.
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a b à CPUs
October 1, 2009 3:36:08 PM

Leave it alone unless you plan to use another aftermarket cooler, then if you do, use the Arctic silver.
a b à CPUs
October 1, 2009 3:38:11 PM

as everyone else has said. leave it alone. You wont get anymore cooling benefits out of it.
October 1, 2009 4:27:06 PM

Thanks, fellows. That confirms my gut instinct. The only reason I questioned it was that the previous CPU went bad on me after 2 years, and wouldn't post. It would just keep increasing temperature above 45 degrees C and climbing fast, still hung midway into POST. The new one solved that problem, and, I had a small worry that the previous one went bad due to my having used the stock thermal compound. My friend (on the other system) told me he removed the stock compound and applied artic silver 5. That seems like a lot of tricky work so I am glad you all agree I should just go with it the way it is. Thanks again.
October 1, 2009 7:55:06 PM

Whoops! I downloaded Prime95 and just now ran that test (two workers) and it took about 8 minutes to get up to 46 degrees C before i stopped it. It looked like it would go even higher and I got worried. Isn't that too high? There is plenty of air flow around the heatsink fins, and, I wonder if maybe I need a larger heatsink, fan, and better thermal compound.

I realize prime95 is a grueling test (especially with two workers simultaneously), but the whole idea for getting this CPU was to be able to put it to hard work without burning it up.

What are your opinions about this kind of heat during the prime95 test? What kinds of OEM heatsink/fan combos would make for significant lower temps during prime95?

The case is still open, and there is plenty of airflow - I'm afraid if I close the case the heat build-up will be even worse - the case fans are large and are blowing plenty of air, but, it seems the CPU generates too much heat for the CPU heatsink/fan combo.

Help.
October 1, 2009 8:51:59 PM

Still more bad news about my cooling problems. I just completed copying from an ATA to a SATA on this machine (DMA copy) of about 70 gigs of data which took about 45 minutes, as expected. However, the CPU temp got up to 38 degrees C just for handling the DMA copy. There is something wrong here - I know my friend's identical system can perform DMA copies and not exceed 32 degrees C no matter how long it takes. Maybe my original hunch may be right - I used the original compound on the previous CPU which eventually burned out on me, and, now, this one starts out too hot, also using the stock thermal compound. I have to find out how to make this thing run cooler - please help. It is a mini ATX case, but, there is a bit more room if I need a larger heatsink/fan combo - which one gives the lowest temperatures for the 5600+?
a b à CPUs
October 1, 2009 9:00:59 PM

I wouldn't worry about the temp until you start getting in to the 60's.
Damage doesn't occur until you're in the 90-110C range.

(My P4 spent 2 years at 80C - dont ask, but even today that chip is happy as and overclocks 15%)
October 2, 2009 4:47:02 PM

Thanks for the info, Rock. I have been wondering whether AC5 or Alumina is better for my setup.. (I currently have plenty of both) now I know.
a b à CPUs
October 3, 2009 1:41:16 AM

AS5 is better for CPUs.
a b à CPUs
October 3, 2009 2:28:57 AM

The stuff on the processor is one use only so if you ever remove it.. clean both sides and put on AS5.

I dont like the older HSC that came on p3's etc it dried out bad to a claylike texture and didnt transfer heat.. the newer stuff is ok.. not as good.. but ok.
October 3, 2009 5:50:46 AM

jsh1284 said:
Thanks for the info, Rock. I have been wondering whether AC5 or Alumina is better for my setup.. (I currently have plenty of both) now I know.


You're welcome dude. :)  Actually, before i bought the Tuniq TX-2 thermal compound the AC5 is really what i want
though i've asked all the local PC shops here in my area unfortunately its out of stock and i have to wait
for 11 days for their new orders to arrive. So i've done some online researching and thankfully xbitlabs has
a shootout of these thermal compounds and the TX-2 catches my attention coz it performs the same as AC5
and its available on the local pc shops here in my area.
a b à CPUs
October 3, 2009 6:17:44 AM

TX-2 is better too because it isn't thermally conductive.
October 9, 2009 4:56:05 AM

I wound up pulling out my CPU and heatsink and cleaning both surfaces and then applying artic silver 5 and re-installing. No change. The thing that I cannot understand is the 5 degree centigrade difference between my PC and my friends, which is identical in every way (same mboard, cpu, memory, etc.). My friend's idles at 28 C, plays movies at 30 C, but mine idles at 34 C, and plays movies at 36 C. I checked the placement of the cables and they look identical to me - I just don't understand it. On mine, the CPU burned out after 2 years and my friend's is still running fine. With my new CPU, the temp is still what it was when I first built it, about 5 C hotter than my friends - I can't help but wonder if that 5 degrees difference in idle speed had something to do with mine burning out while my friend's is still running fine. Any ideas?
I looked into using a better heatsink/fan, but, the write-ups don't suggest that my operating temps would be reduced, so, I am thinking the machine I built for my friend turns out to be a fluke in that it runs so cool - I didn't do anything any different. I even switched the PC's earlier (my friend's PC in my house, mine over there), and the temp differences remained the same (my friend's PC ran cool in my house, mine ran hot in my friend's house). Really perplexed here.
October 9, 2009 6:40:13 PM

leatherbury said:
I wound up pulling out my CPU and heatsink and cleaning both surfaces and then applying artic silver 5 and re-installing. No change. The thing that I cannot understand is the 5 degree centigrade difference between my PC and my friends, which is identical in every way (same mboard, cpu, memory, etc.). My friend's idles at 28 C, plays movies at 30 C, but mine idles at 34 C, and plays movies at 36 C. I checked the placement of the cables and they look identical to me - I just don't understand it. On mine, the CPU burned out after 2 years and my friend's is still running fine. With my new CPU, the temp is still what it was when I first built it, about 5 C hotter than my friends - I can't help but wonder if that 5 degrees difference in idle speed had something to do with mine burning out while my friend's is still running fine. Any ideas?
I looked into using a better heatsink/fan, but, the write-ups don't suggest that my operating temps would be reduced, so, I am thinking the machine I built for my friend turns out to be a fluke in that it runs so cool - I didn't do anything any different. I even switched the PC's earlier (my friend's PC in my house, mine over there), and the temp differences remained the same (my friend's PC ran cool in my house, mine ran hot in my friend's house). Really perplexed here.


It depends on the amount of thermal compound (thickness) you applied to your procie, as far as applying is concerned,
less is more. Meaning???.. You apply thermal compound on your procie to the point that its almost see through,
this makes the transferring of heat from your procie to the heat sink more efficient where as applying thick layer of thermal
compound only stricken's it. The factor to consider too is the performance of the thermal compound you used, the faster it can
transfer heat away from your procie and to the cpu cooler the cooler your procie will be (Well, in your case you got no problem with that with your AC5). Another thing to consider is the case fans installed in your casing, if the internal components of your pc is not properly ventilated it will generate more heat thus making the air inside your system more hotter and that affects the temperature of
your procie. If your PC is well ventilated then something's wrong with the built of your procie, perhaps its metal casing is not
attached well to the inner cores that's why its generating more heat than to what your friends has.
a c 159 à CPUs
October 9, 2009 7:33:09 PM

Those cpus can run fine up to about 60c. Your friend may have a different board or bios version, so the temp reading will vary slightly. I've been building my own systems and working at Dell. Everytime you touch your cpu, you can cause electrostatic discharge damage. It's not worth the risk. Be happy it works. Leave it alone and enjoy.
October 10, 2009 7:53:14 AM

o1die said:
Your friend may have a different board or bios version, so the temp reading will vary slightly.


@ leatherbury
This might be one of those few reasons i didn't include why your procie runs hotter than the usual.
!