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Replace but keep hard drive- windows 7

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March 27, 2011 3:49:24 PM

So I broke down and bought a new hard drive however this hard drive is bigger and faster than my old and I want to copy clone the new 1tb drive from the old 500gb drive, but then I would like to have the 500gb drive still attached as a 2nd hard drive, and would like a little advice to make sure I don't lose all my data.

I plan on using windows 7 system image and creating an image of this current drive onto the new 1tb drive
Then I plan on disconnecting my 500gb drive and inserting the system restore disc and restoring the system image from the 1tb drive.

two questions,
1.) Is that correct in the procedure to essentially clone my drive onto a new one? any problems I should be aware of?
2.) After I have my system installed onto the 1tb drive, how do I go about clearing off the old 500gb drive?
March 27, 2011 5:36:26 PM

Sanpan said:
So I broke down and bought a new hard drive however this hard drive is bigger and faster than my old and I want to copy clone the new 1tb drive from the old 500gb drive, but then I would like to have the 500gb drive still attached as a 2nd hard drive, and would like a little advice to make sure I don't lose all my data.

I plan on using windows 7 system image and creating an image of this current drive onto the new 1tb drive
Then I plan on disconnecting my 500gb drive and inserting the system restore disc and restoring the system image from the 1tb drive.

two questions,
1.) Is that correct in the procedure to essentially clone my drive onto a new one? any problems I should be aware of?
2.) After I have my system installed onto the 1tb drive, how do I go about clearing off the old 500gb drive?


If you're not afraid of Linux boot CDs, then you should check out gparted to clone your disk then resize the partition. This will save you a lot of time, since you won't have to save an image first then try to restore it. Cloning it will also take care of MBR and GPT.

Start by downloading and burning gparted live iso to a CD. Power your PC off, install your new drive in your old drive's spot, and place the old drive in the spare drive (usually above where your old disk used to be). Boot up your PC with the CD you burned, and just keep pressing enter at all the prompts. Eventually, you'll be present with a desktop and the gparted software will automatically start. At the upper right corner of gparted will be a drop-down list. It will label your hard drives along with their respective sizes. The labels will usually look like "/dev/sda". Make not of these device labels, specifically remember which one is the old, smaller drive and which one is the new, larger drive.

Leave the gparted software open so you can reference it. Look on the desktop for the application "Terminal" and double click it. A black window will open. In this window type the following in replacing your device labels accordingly:

Quote:
sudo dd if=(old drive label) of=(new drive label) bs=4096


Note, you will need to replace the "old drive" part with the label you got from gparted. It should still be open if you need a reference. So as an example, your actual line should look similar to the following:
Quote:
This is just an example.
dd if=/dev/sdb of=/dev/sda bs=4096


The copying will take a while, so go grab some lunch and let it run a while. After it's done, go back to gparted, click "File" in the top left corner, and click "Refresh Devices" after a while both drives will be presented, but the 1TB drive will have a lot of grey to the right of the yellow. Click the yellow part, and click "Resize" button. This will bring up a separate window with a graph and numerical inputs. Leave the numbers alone, just hover the mouse over the top graph's far right yellow edge. The cursor should change to a resize arrows. Click and drag the edge to the far right as possible. Click "Resize" at the bottom of the window. You will now see most of the grey has disappeared and should now be white. The white is normal as it graphically represents the usable free space on the drive that Windows can use. In order to make these changes permanent, you must click the "Apply" button from the menu. Once you apply the changes, close the program out and double click the "Shutdown" icon from the desktop. Choose to shutdown the computer. The cd will eject and you'll have to press enter to finish the shutdown.

Once you've removed the CD and the computer is turned off, remove your old hard drive from your computer, and start your computer. Windows should now start as normal, but it will run a chkdsk scan on the hard drive. LET IT. This is normal and necessary to make any repairs that are necessary due to the partition resizing. If all works, and you can run a few programs, shut down your computer, install your old drive and place the CD back into your DVD-reader. Boot the CD like before and wait for gparted to start. Select you old drive, click on the yellow parts, press the delete key on your keyboard until the entire drive is gray. Click Apply to save your changes. After the changes apply, and gparted rescans your hard drives, select your old drive again, except press the "New" button. The new partition will take up the entire drive by default, but if it doesn't, use the sliders to fill the entire graph. Take note at the file system type. It will default to ext2 which Windows cannot read. Click the drop down box to change it to NTFS. In the label field, named the drive. Press the "Add" button at the bottom of the window. Press the apply button to save your changes. Double click the "Shutdown" icon and choose reboot. The cd should eject like before, so remove it and press enter to restarting your computer.

Your computer should boot directly to Windows 7. if it doesn't, check your bios and computer manual about boot priority. If Windows 7 boots, it may want to check the old drive. This is normal, but it should only occur once. You may want to format the old drive once more to ensure that the file system is built correctly for Windows. The reason you can't just put the old hard drive in, is because their will be a unique Id conflict that will prevent Windows from enabling the drive.

You should be all set now. Let us know if you have any questions or need anything clarified.
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March 27, 2011 6:39:44 PM

Alright, I read through it and I think I will do what you suggested, something about trusting windows with my entire hard drive idk lol

Umm first quick question, I googled gparted went to http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php and it says for x86 systems im running 64-bit will that matter?
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March 27, 2011 8:10:03 PM

No, x64 is backward compatible with x86, and it's used as a generic term for Pentium based processors. For future reference, if it's x86 it's a PC. If it's ARM, it's some mobile or low power device, and if it's PowerPC, it's some old Mac that's still floating around for some reason or a gaming console.
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