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Gigabyte motherboard heat problems

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July 6, 2009 6:31:32 PM

Hello,
I recently purchased a GigaByte EX58-UD3R motherboard with the intel i7 920 processor. I had heat problems from the very beginnen. 50 Celsius idele and 90 Celsius full loda. Tried everything, but returned the motherboard and cpu for testing. Turned out the motherboard was the cause of the problem. I got a new board, but it gave me the exact same problem. Returned it also, and now they tell me that I probably didn't use enough cooler paste. Sounds really strange to me.
First motherboard has a defect, and now for the second with the exact same problem they tell me it's the paste. I used Zalman ZM-STG1 paste. Can this really cause such a big difference in temperatures? Even with the stock paste that came with the cooler temperatures went sky high.
What do you think? Should I demand a different motherboard, like the asus P6T? I feel really ripped off right now

Thanks for reading.
Bas Brouwers
a b V Motherboard
July 6, 2009 7:05:17 PM

Curious, did you say you returned the cpu, cooler, and mobo to Gigabyte for testing?

And where does "Even with the stock paste that came with the cooler temperatures went sky high" come in? Were there other attempts, another cooler?

Being "ripped off" is a possibility, of course, but before going there why not put more paste on, take a picture, attach and ensure the cooler is on correctly, and try it.

@ your question: If you put NO thermal paste on, temps will be sky-high because both surfaces are NOT perfectly flat. That's why ALL heatsinks need paste. So if you don't put enough paste on to fill the gaps you have, what do you think the result will be?
July 6, 2009 7:14:29 PM

Well, when I first got the cpu it came with paste strips applied from the factory. I installed it that way first. When the temperatures got so high I bought other paste, the zalman i mentioned in my previous post. Nothing changed. I then returned the motherboard, CPU and processor to the place where I bought it. Having the same problems with the new one i returned it also. It's still there and thay want me to pay 30 dollars as payment for the testing costs and additional shipping costs for sending everything back.
But I'm not convinced by their test. They didn't show me any results, just te message that everything was fine.
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a b V Motherboard
July 6, 2009 7:48:43 PM

The cpu came with paste strips from the factory? Oh, you must mean the factory heat sink came with paste.

Anyhow, when you applied the new paste, did you first remove the old paste and use a bit of alcohol to ensure clean surfaces?

What the "store" seems to be telling you is they think there is nothing wrong with your mobo, cooler, and processor. They think your assembly is the problem, or that there is really *NO* problem. Ask them what makes them feel that way. Might learn something, might not.

If they say they assembled the parts, and the temps were "X", consider paying the $30 for having them do the testing twice, plus maybe whatever it costs if they can assemble the three parts for you.

Where did you get your temp numbers from? What is the temp of your room? If you didn't use realTemp or CoreTemp to get your temps, download them and use them once you get your kit back.
July 6, 2009 9:38:38 PM

Hello Twoboxer

Thanks for your reply!
For measuring my temps I used core temp. My room temp is about 28 degrees celsius. The case is from cooler master with to fans, on front and one back. My videocard has no problems regarding overheating.
I cleaned of the paste that was on the stock cooler and thorougly cleaned it with alcohol. Then applied the Zalman paste wich comes in a little jar with a brush, so very easy to apply.
The first motherboard I returned was tested and they discovered it was mallfunctioning. So they send me a new one. Seeing as it is reacting exactly the same I was under the impression that it had the same problems.
I know aplying to little or to much paste can greatly reduce the cooling of the CPU, but this is extreme. On load it rockets to 90 degrees. I stopped there and shut down the PC to let it cool.I'm just wondering if these temperatures can be caused by insufficient cooler paste.
Oh well, I guess I will phone them tomorrow and ask a more precise test report, showing me the temperatures they measured.

Keeping my fingers crossed, this baby has cost me a little fortune already :) 

a c 86 V Motherboard
July 6, 2009 9:48:46 PM

This sounds like a case of an incorrectly installed stock Intel HSF. Did you closely follow the directions? Were the push-pins turned the OPPOSITE direction as the arrows? Did you install the cooler outside of the case so you could ensure all 4 of the push-pins fully seated? Does the cooler feel loose at all?

I'm having a hard time understanding what the motherboard has to do with CPU temps.
a c 94 V Motherboard
July 6, 2009 9:57:11 PM

shortstuff_mt said:
This sounds like a case of an incorrectly installed stock Intel HSF. Did you closely follow the directions? Were the push-pins turned the OPPOSITE direction as the arrows? Did you install the cooler outside of the case so you could ensure all 4 of the push-pins fully seated? Does the cooler feel loose at all?

I'm having a hard time understanding what the motherboard has to do with CPU temps.



EXACTL
Y.

its not a mb overheating but a cpu running hotter than expected .

Almost certainly the issue is not enough contact pressure between the hsf and the cpu .

The correct ammount of paste to use is very little . All its doing is filling microscopic differences between the two parts .

The only hardware issue that could cause this and is worth checking is that the base of the hsf is machined flat and smooth . If it is then we have an installation issue .
Damn those pushpins !
a b V Motherboard
July 6, 2009 10:20:21 PM

Yeah, its important to learn what makes them think its OK lol. I think they owe you that, particularly after charging you.

If/When you reassemble the kit, try this BEFORE installing the mobo:

1) Apply the thermal paste. (I'm not going to recommend a pea-sized amount, or spreading out an extremely thin layer using a razor blade/credit card, or putting three thin lines like the stock cooler comes with. Because all of them can work.)

2) Press the heat sink onto the cpu fairly hard, but do not install the pins. (Or fully install it, your option.)

3) Remove the heat sink and look at the paste on the cpu and heat sink. Did any leak out past the heat sink (too much)? Does it look like too little (much smaller area than heat sink)?

4) Anyhow, adjust the amount of paste and reapply.

5) Install the heat sink, doing pin #1, #3, #2, #4, ie, opposite corners.

6) IMPORTANT: Look at the other side of the mobo, and make CERTAIN that you see that the catches on the two split portions of each pin are under the mobo, and are gripping it because the "third" pin you pushed down between them has forced them outwards. Only then is the heat sink properly installed.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.
July 7, 2009 12:25:39 PM

I can asure you that I correctly installed the stock Intel HSF. And the amount of paste was also sufficient. I've build more systems in the past and never had so much trouble as with this one. Just rang the company and now they want me to return the PSU and memory to check if this is causing the heat problems. And all this time I don't have a working PC. Last time I ever bought any parts there!

Will keep you posted!
a b V Motherboard
July 7, 2009 6:26:01 PM

OK, good luck.
a c 86 V Motherboard
July 7, 2009 6:31:28 PM

That shop sounds like a piece of work. Anyone can replace parts until you happen to get a good combination. It sounds like they don't have any troubleshooting skills at all. I don't see how the RAM could effect the CPU temp. I guess the PSU could possibly be the problem, but I stick by my statement about the cooler. Let us know how it goes.
a b V Motherboard
July 7, 2009 8:54:20 PM

^+1. They do sound like some shop with out skills. IT IS the CPU cooler. Nothing else can possibly heat up the CPU with the exception of poor airflow, broken fans,etc. PSU/RAM/Motherboard will NOT affect CPU temps, UNLESS the CPU temp sensors are stuck.

Download and run RealTemp's "Test Sensor".
a c 86 V Motherboard
July 7, 2009 9:15:52 PM

^ +1. Blaming a high CPU temp on the motherboard/RAM/etc... is just silly and doesn't make any sense.
July 7, 2009 10:01:16 PM

thanks everyone for your replies. I've again contacted them and asked them to send back my boaard, processor and cooler. I have an extra power supply and will use that to test, but will first take your advise and try to reinstall everything again, triple checking everything as I go along.
I'll let you know how things go :) 

a b V Motherboard
July 7, 2009 10:16:05 PM

^Good luck. Also remember to clean out old paste (Use 90%+ Alcohol) and put in new thermal paste.
July 9, 2009 5:42:17 PM

shortstuff_mt said:
This sounds like a case of an incorrectly installed stock Intel HSF. Did you closely follow the directions? Were the push-pins turned the OPPOSITE direction as the arrows? Did you install the cooler outside of the case so you could ensure all 4 of the push-pins fully seated? Does the cooler feel loose at all?

I'm having a hard time understanding what the motherboard has to do with CPU temps.


He build the system once and it's not the first time he install hardware. Send the stuff back to be tested... and they get to the same conclusion.

So the guy at the store send him back a new mobo with his old stuff... and he get the same result... I am sorry, but I also tend to believe Gigabyte mobo could be the problem, it's a possibility especially with my personal experience I got with them. My 965P-DS3 died 3 times in about a year...

I have read a x58 MSI review last night and the board... simply burst... :p 

If the board cannot properly flow the cpu needs, I think it could be possible...

But once you get your new cpu cooler, you will know the answer.
a b V Motherboard
July 9, 2009 7:18:30 PM

^Note, that most of the Motherboards/GPUs/CPUs burning up are caused by not using a high quality PSU. This is not to say that good quality motherboards will fail, but it is unlikely (if using quality parts for ALL parts of the system). My take on motherboards: Gigabyte, ASUS and EVGA make good boards. Some of the BIOSTAR boards are quite good too.
July 9, 2009 7:31:57 PM

Well, when I was buying all the components I thought about that too, so I bought a Cooler Master Silent Pro M 600W PSU. I hope that is sufficient. I read some good reviews about that PSU.
I'm hoping to get my CPU and motherboard back before the weekend! Will post my findings when I've rebuild everything.
July 30, 2009 6:17:05 PM

just to let you know how things turned out. Communication with the reseller is really extremely bad. They don't keep their promisses and just shipped everything back, no further sollution offered. I've rebuild the system (I',m getting quicker and quicker :)  ). Used Artic Silver5 as thermal compound this time. Tripple checked to see that the cooler pins clicked into place. Double checked the backside of the motherboard to zee that everthing was properly installed. Booted the system......... and everything is still exactly the same.
I'm going to invest in a new cooler. That's my last option. PSU checked out fine, so that's not the problem. I guess by stock cooler just isn't connecting good enough with the heatspreader of the cpu.
Any suggestions on a good cooler? I'm thinking about the Scythe Mugen 2 . Anybody have any experience with these?
How will I know if it will fit :)  These things are HUGE!

Thanks for reading!

Bas
August 4, 2009 8:29:38 PM

Hi all,
The Scythe Mugen 2 is installed and temperatures have dropped by 10 degrees celcius.
Ambient temp. is about 28 degrees. Under full load the temp max. is 63 degrees celcius.
Idle is around 37. I'm happy with these temp, but the idle is kind of high I think, but is is sufficient, so I won't complain :D 

Greetz,
Bas
a b V Motherboard
August 4, 2009 11:25:11 PM

Glad you fixed it. Well done. Also thanks for letting us know how it went.
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
September 29, 2010 3:00:05 PM

basbrouwers said:
Hi all,
The Scythe Mugen 2 is installed and temperatures have dropped by 10 degrees celcius.
Ambient temp. is about 28 degrees. Under full load the temp max. is 63 degrees celcius.
Idle is around 37. I'm happy with these temp, but the idle is kind of high I think, but is is sufficient, so I won't complain :D 

Greetz,
Bas


Was your high temperature the CPU temp or the System Temp? My Gigabyte mobo has a low CPU temp (26C) and a high (93C) system temp.
September 29, 2010 5:26:48 PM

My high temps were the CPU temp. I'm still running the system with no problems since I've installed the Scythe Mugen 2 and the system performs great. Don't know why it has this high idle temp but it's working and I've decided not to check it anymore, saves me alot of stress :D 
!