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Cant logon to XP because domain not available

Last response: in Windows XP
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December 14, 2011 11:00:30 PM

ilnero[at]ozemail.com.au
My home computer, running XP Professional decided to lock me out with a dread blue screen. I went in through Restore, using Windows start-up and tried /fixboot and later /fixmbr in DOS. Now I can get to the Safe Mode screen in Windows, but the ayatem won't let me in as Administrator or through my Personal Login. It simply say "cant logon to XP because domain not available". Is there a way around this

More about : logon domain

December 16, 2011 4:16:49 AM

From the Safe Mode Options list, try the Last Known Good Configuration option. This logon option will use the Last Configuration that worked, so it may allow a logon even when the Safe Mode option doesn't. And if that option doesn't work,.. if the case has the COA Product key in the back, your best alternative is to reinstall the System. If the key is not available, you will need another computer to burn a CD with the Hiren's Live Boot CD and from the Live CD recover the Windows XP Product Key with password recovery apps included. http://www.hirensbootcd.org/download/
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December 16, 2011 5:30:26 AM


Plug the hard drive into another computer as a data drive. Start Regedit, 'Import' the problem computers registry using the good computers Regedit and go to:

hkey_local_Machine, Software, Microsoft, WindowsNT, Current Version, Winlogon (open this). On the right look at DefaultDomainName and AltDefaultDomainName and make sure that they are exactly the same as the computer name (caps and all).

Yes, domain name, even if it's never been part of a domain. Those two entries must absolutely match the computer name.

I'm running late for an appointment right now but I wanted to chime in with this. If problem not solved in about 16 hours (when I can next get to my computer) then I'll have a positive way to edit the registry without removing the drive. I guess what I'm saying is.. don't give up and re-load windows, it can be saved.

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December 16, 2011 5:41:48 AM

Chicano said:
From the Safe Mode Options list, try the Last Known Good Configuration option. This logon option will use the Last Configuration that worked, so it may allow a logon even when the Safe Mode option doesn't. And if that option doesn't work,.. if the case has the COA Product key in the back, your best alternative is to reinstall the System. If the key is not available, you will need another computer to burn a CD with the Hiren's Live Boot CD and from the Live CD recover the Windows XP Product Key with password recovery apps included. http://www.hirensbootcd.org/download/


Thanks Chicano I'll look into this approach and get back to you. ilnero
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December 16, 2011 5:43:55 AM

tigsounds said:
Plug the hard drive into another computer as a data drive. Start Regedit, 'Import' the problem computers registry using the good computers Regedit and go to:

hkey_local_Machine, Software, Microsoft, WindowsNT, Current Version, Winlogon (open this). On the right look at DefaultDomainName and AltDefaultDomainName and make sure that they are exactly the same as the computer name (caps and all).

Yes, domain name, even if it's never been part of a domain. Those two entries must absolutely match the computer name.

I'm running late for an appointment right now but I wanted to chime in with this. If problem not solved in about 16 hours (when I can next get to my computer) then I'll have a positive way to edit the registry without removing the drive. I guess what I'm saying is.. don't give up and re-load windows, it can be saved.



Hi tigsounds Thanks for the info. I'll try that approach, but not until Tuesday next week, and get back to you.
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December 16, 2011 8:48:08 PM

Adding this to complement tigsounds' answer.
This is how to edit the registry from a host computer or from a Live CD:
From the host computer or Live CD, Start the Windows Registry and select HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE and go to File Menu \ Select \ Load Hive \ browse to *X:\WINDOWS\System32\Config\select SOFTWARE \ Accept \ this will create a new key containing your OS registry and prompt for a new key name… so name the Key AAAAA… Next starting from the key named AAAAA browse to; SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon… and verify in the string value named Userinit, with data; **X:\WINDOWS\system32\userinit.exe, that the drive letter **X matches the original drive letter in your affected XP installation. This is to double check you are in the correct windows registry before checking/edtiting the “DefaultDomainName” and “AltDefaultDomainName” REG_SZ strings to match the same Windows XP name (your Wind XP name).

*X:\ represents the drive letter assigned to your Unbootable Drive by the host Computer or Live CD, and not necessarily the original C letter so make sure you are on the right drive.
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December 29, 2011 1:48:19 AM

Chicano said:
From the Safe Mode Options list, try the Last Known Good Configuration option. This logon option will use the Last Configuration that worked, so it may allow a logon even when the Safe Mode option doesn't. And if that option doesn't work,.. if the case has the COA Product key in the back, your best alternative is to reinstall the System. If the key is not available, you will need another computer to burn a CD with the Hiren's Live Boot CD and from the Live CD recover the Windows XP Product Key with password recovery apps included. http://www.hirensbootcd.org/download/


To both Chicano and tigsounds, I bought a new internal drive with the intention of setting it up as the main disk so that I could hopefully use it to read the problem drive as a slave drive. Having formatted it, using my XP master CD, XP began loading Windows, moving to a screen that showed there were 39 minutes left in the process when the time got to 34 minutes the message was that of "loading devices". The loading got to halfway before the system restarted. This was the beginning of an ongoing cycle of restart Windows, 39 minutes to 34 minutes, "loading devices" halfway the resart, and so on. Does anyone have a suggestion as to what might be wrong with my system? Regards
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December 29, 2011 3:14:28 AM

If this problem occurs with the old hard drive installed (both HDs connected), remove the power and digital connectors from that hard drive. If the new Hard Drive is SATA, you may need to configure the BIOS to IDE Native so it detects the HD as IDE.

If it occurs with only the new hard drive installed in the PC.. the cause could be defective RAM. Check the RAM modules are fully seated in the sockets and run a memory check application. Windows Memory Diagnostic is supposed to report Good or Bad RAM module/s so that application would be my first coice but there are other applications of the type to try if the Windows Memory Diagnostic doesn't give a definite result.

5 Free Memory Test Programs
http://pcsupport.about.com/od/toolsofthetrade/tp/memory...

If the memory test reports good ram, you may need to check the CD Drive digital and power connections, possibly clean the laser lens, or replace the drive.. and if necessary and your system BIOS has the capability, you can even install Windows XP from a bootable USB Flash Drive.

How To Boot From A USB Flash Drive
http://www.bootdisk.com/pendrive.htm

Install Windows XP from USB Flash/Pen Drive
http://www.techtipsgeek.com/install-windows-from-usb-fl...
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December 29, 2011 11:11:42 AM

Chicano said:
If this problem occurs with the old hard drive installed (both HDs connected), remove the power and digital connectors from that hard drive. If the new Hard Drive is SATA, you may need to configure the BIOS to IDE Native so it detects the HD as IDE.

If it occurs with only the new hard drive installed in the PC.. the cause could be defective RAM. Check the RAM modules are fully seated in the sockets and run a memory check application. Windows Memory Diagnostic is supposed to report Good or Bad RAM module/s so that application would be my first coice but there are other applications of the type to try if the Windows Memory Diagnostic doesn't give a definite result.

5 Free Memory Test Programs
http://pcsupport.about.com/od/toolsofthetrade/tp/memory...

If the memory test reports good ram, you may need to check the CD Drive digital and power connections, possibly clean the laser lens, or replace the drive.. and if necessary and your system BIOS has the capability, you can even install Windows XP from a bootable USB Flash Drive.

How To Boot From A USB Flash Drive
http://www.bootdisk.com/pendrive.htm

Thanks Chicano

I'll give your recent suggestions a go, and get back as soon as sobriety allows. lol

Regards
Install Windows XP from USB Flash/Pen Drive
http://www.techtipsgeek.com/install-windows-from-usb-fl...

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