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LGA-1366 Compared to LGA-1156

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October 8, 2009 2:35:37 PM

So, I am having a difficult time deciding whether I should purchase an i7 920, or an i7 860. I know that the 860 has a slightly faster clockspeed, and that they are nearly identical in all other respects besides the aforementioned clockspeed difference and the socket type used. I have heard mention that LGA-1366 has benefits (I don't care at all about it being 'future-proof' for 'six-core monsters', so don't even bring it up) such as a faster interface with RAM.

I will mostly be using the computer for High Quality video viewing and editing, as well as a healthy amount of highest-quality-possible gaming.

I could really use some insight as to whether it is worth it to get the 920, or if there is no difference, the 860.

Thanks in advance! :D 
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October 8, 2009 5:42:19 PM

There are a ton of threads already on this so try searching the forums if you haven't already done so, plus why not bring up the future-proofing and six-core points? They are perfectly valid and part of the pro-1366 argument so there's no need to be shitty about it.

RAM interface isn't faster than the 1156 (both platforms can overclock to 2000MHz in many cases, however the 1156 supports 1600MHz natively), but the 1366 platform uses TRIPLE channel memory as opposed to the 1156's DUAL channel memory.

Given what you want to use your system for, the 1366 is the obvious answer: video editing will eat up as much CPU power and RAM as you can throw at it, so having triple channel to run 12GB or even 24GB (when 4GB DDR3 modules are reasonably priced) will be great. Plus you will have the option of the 6 core in the future - a perfectly valid point for video work.

Similarly having more x16 PCI-E lanes available on 1366 means you can run your top-end SLI/Crossfire setup with fewer fears of running out of headroom - at the moment the 1156 doesn't saturate the cards but that could easily change soon.

Basically there's more "oomph" that you will directly use with 1366 so go for that. Just make sure you get a top-end cooler (or water cooling) and crank your D0 stepping i970 to 4GHz and you're away.

For video though you'll also need some good access time and data transfer rates on your hard drives, so I'd strongly recommend putting 2 or 3 drives into a RAID 0.
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October 8, 2009 6:48:14 PM

Though I agree with what LePhuronn says, I don't think the 920 has that much of an advantage for video encoding, viewing, or 3D rendering.

The 860 beats out the 920 for most video encoding: http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=364...

It also hangs with it when 3D rendering: http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=364...

It also beats the 920 in gaming benchmarks (higher clock?): http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=364...

So you wouldn't see much benefit of going 1366 over 1156, plus you save on memory and mobo, and you consume much less power.

Then again, I am bias to the 860 because I bought it :) .
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October 8, 2009 9:07:09 PM

Quote:
crank your D0 stepping i970 to 4GHz and you're away.

For video though you'll also need some good access time and data transfer rates on your hard drives, so I'd strongly recommend putting 2 or 3 drives into a RAID 0.


What does D0 stepping i970 to 4GHz mean?

Also, I am unfamiliar with RAID 0; what benefits would this provide?

PS. Sorry, I didn't mean to be shitty, it's just that all the other similar threads were littered with replies about the 6-cores and future-proofing that didn't answer any questions, but rather just argued. I wanted to try to make this thread as succinct as possible.
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October 9, 2009 2:28:03 PM

Does anyone know???
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October 10, 2009 1:29:30 PM

iharvey92,

LePhuronn meant that if you overclock a Core i7 920 D0 (newer Stepping than C0) to 4.0 Ghz, then performance is stellar. RAID 0 means that 2 or 3 identical hard drives are "striped" so that read or write occurs simultaneously on all drives, which yields much faster performance and increased capacity.

I'm running a hand picked i7 920 C0 overclocked to 4.1 Ghz, with 3 Western Digital 300 GB VelociRaptor 10,000 RPM drives in RAID 0 (900 GB total). Believe me, it's definately fast.

Comp :sol: 
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October 11, 2009 10:04:32 PM

So, overall, what i7 is going to suite me better? (keeping in mind that most of my activities involve high end games and high quality video, with other software running in the background)

Basically, everything I do requires a lot of memory.
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October 11, 2009 10:19:57 PM

I would get the i860. Its cheaper. Its just as fast if not faster in apps. With either cpu you will not notice the difference in the real world. The 1156 board can run 16gb of ram.

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October 12, 2009 12:47:43 AM

Please read the links I posted. This will show you that the 860 is much better for what you are using your system for.
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October 12, 2009 8:36:03 AM

+1 for i7-860. You can OC it to 5GHz on air which put i7-920 into a shame.
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October 12, 2009 9:48:33 AM

andy5174 said:
+1 for i7-860. You can OC it to 5GHz on air which put i7-920 into a shame.

5GHz on air is extremely unlikely at best. On average, they seem to be getting around 4Ghz overclocks, which isn't far off of the 920. I agree that the 860 is a great choice though.
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October 12, 2009 9:49:19 PM

Thanks guys! It looks like I am going to get the 860 :D  Any ideas on a good/cheap build? (as far as memory, motherboard, case, power supply go; cause I have everything else)
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October 12, 2009 10:32:31 PM

iharvey92 said:
Thanks guys! It looks like I am going to get the 860 :D  Any ideas on a good/cheap build? (as far as memory, motherboard, case, power supply go; cause I have everything else)

Dude don't.
You said You want extreme gaming. Going LGA 1156 over LGA 1366 is the stupidest thing you can do.
LGA 1156 only supports dual x8 PCI-E. Even tho the results were only 10~fps gain, we don't know with future GPU's how big will the bottleneck be.
Another good reason is the upgrade-> LGA 1156 next cpu is the i5-670 (compared to i5-750), with less cache (less good for gaming). While LGA 1136 will have the new i9 gulftown 6cores.

Think about the future. Right now the 860vs920 is EQUAL (860 beat in video, 920 beat in Dual GPU gaming) but soon the LGA 1156 will show its true weakness.
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October 12, 2009 11:31:25 PM

It will not show this so called true weakness in single card gpu solutions. Being that op is looking for cheaper parts for the rest of the system, I cant see this person tossing in two of the most powerfull gpus in the system. So this true weakness will never show.

The op also says he does not care about the 6 core i9 upgrade at all. So him buying a 1336 system is not practical.

For this case I dont see it practical at all to buy a 920 system.
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October 12, 2009 11:48:10 PM

Well no, he said he have already a video card, it means getting another will cost him nothing compared to the huge performance he will gain since most of the cards are under 200 now like GTX 260 or HD 4890/4870.

He said he wants High end performance gaming. To get HIGH END you NEED dual GPU, unless you go HD 5870 or GTX 295 (wich imo sucks)
So yes unless he plans on upgrading in 1 year a WHOLE NEW COMPUTER, then true there is no reason going 920. Now if he plans on keeping his computer high end for a good 2/3 years, hes gonna need the 920's futureproof/Gpu scaling.

The rest is up to him
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October 13, 2009 12:08:25 AM

I dont see high end gaming as a dual gpu solution myself. I see it as more of gaming enthusiast who ends up going that route. Spending ALOT more money for very little improvement.

I just cant see person a that is not concerned AT ALL with the upcoming i9 cpu to care about a upgrading to a multi gpu system. Or constantly upgrading his dual gpus every year.
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October 13, 2009 12:43:44 AM

Well it really depends on HOW you use crossfire. For me crossfire is the best gpu solution performance/price

You buy a card 250. it's quite cool, now they release a new super card but its 300. U just bought u cant afford, thats when your card is now 180~ (took for example HD 4870). You buy another one, and you just reached the power of the new super card (might even owned it.).

See? it all depends how you consider Dual GPU, and many people consider it the way I do, and not for enthusiasm.
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October 13, 2009 6:04:23 AM

Why can't people just accept that the 1156 hangs with the 1366 for much cheaper? :ange:  It's like a whole new fanboism lol...
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October 13, 2009 12:13:41 PM

Thread cleaned of side-argument. Happy to continue via PM.

jj463rd said:
I was just checking out this ASUS P7P55D Premium 1156 motherboard.It apparently has support for the new SATA III 6G hard drives (I don't see the new hard drives as being available yet though).
An early review here http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=769
and I see the motherboard at newegg
Expensive though but intriguing
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Pretty sweet board. Although for that price you could buy something far more useful for boosting performance :D 
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