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Machine won't start

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  • CPUs
  • Power
Last response: in CPUs
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October 8, 2009 4:34:26 PM

I just got a Gigabyte GA-MA785GM-US2H and it came with this AMD Athlon II X2 240 Regor 2.8GHz 2 x 1MB L2 Cache Socket AM3 65W Dual-Core Processor. I also got some RAM: OCZ OCZ2RPR10664GK 4GB PC2-8500 (DDR2-1066) DDR2, and a hard drive: WESTERN DIGITAL Caviar® Green WD10EADS 1TB SATA II 7200 RPM 32MB Buffer. I placed in the CPU per the documentation, added the heat sink, and I put in the memory. I have a 500W psu which the documentation suggested "for any expansion capabilities", so I know I have enough power. To my knowledge, that should be all I need to power on the machine and enter the BIOS. I added the hard drive just for kicks but it still wouldn't power on.

I tried the PSU on the previous machine and it powered on just fine. I can see the lights on the board indicating power is GETTING there but when I click the power button it won't turn on. I googled a lot, and some things that I already tried were:

no power so no boot-up beep codes coming from the speakers

tried the memory in another machine that accepted pc2-8500 ram and it worked fine

cpu seems seated a little funky b/c of the paste but it's glued in there alright

Can anyone suggest some other tips? Thanks!

More about : machine start

October 8, 2009 4:59:34 PM

Is the power button of the case properly connected to the motherboard?

Not to sound insulting, but it's a funny issue that happens to the best of us, including myself!
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October 8, 2009 5:09:33 PM

Did you mount the mobo properly? Check for anything behind the mobo that might cause a short. Also, did you check what the LEDs mean in the manual? Try moving the memory into different slots.
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October 8, 2009 5:34:34 PM

Hey all, thanks for replying. I'm sure the power button is mounted properly because the manual was very specific about what pins go where. As for the mobo, it's a micro atx and I have a micro atx case and the holes line up for screwing in, so I'm sure I put that in properly. I used spacers too so from my angle it seems there's enough room behind the mobo and there doesn't appear to be any metal touching the underside to cause a short.

I've never really put a CPU into a board before but I'm pretty sure it was done properly per the documentation. I did check those LED's and the manual is pretty clear about green for power and red for activity. Yeah, I know it happens to everyone that's why I figured instead of calling tech support (and they will prolly only help me with issues related to the mobo not anything I bought separately) I'd just put a quick post on the forums.

The only thing I could possibly think of is does it matter what type of paste I use on the CPU? Isn't it supposed to be conductive of some sort?
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October 8, 2009 5:53:56 PM

I had the same problem at one point and it was the slots I put the memory in. You could also have a shot board? Did you make sure all the power connections are in the board from the PSU?
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October 8, 2009 6:48:40 PM

Ok update - the glue by the CPU seems to be making the smell. I knew it was the CPU all along, but I wasn't precisely sure. It almost seems like the paste is bubbling from the electric current. Does anyone know if there's a generic paste for all CPU's or do you have to get a specific paste depending on the CPU or mobo? Really like to get this thing working today :D  Appreciate your replies.
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October 8, 2009 6:51:56 PM

Wait... what kind of thermal paste did you use on the CPU? Did you put it in the socket, apply the paste to the top of it, then attach the fan?
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a c 98 à CPUs
October 8, 2009 6:55:34 PM

I don't mean to sound insulting either, but it almost sounds like you put the thermal paste on the bottom of the CPU where the pins are. I hope not, the thermal paste goes on the top of the CPU.

This checklist was created for troubleshooting problems like this:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
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October 8, 2009 7:00:01 PM

I got some thermal paste from a friend who works at Best Buy. It's DX-STC 100. I sort of did as you described - I thought you put the paste in the socket and then put the CPU in to kind of glue it together. It fit perfectly fine after a little wiggling and I checked the pins and they're still all straight but there was that weird smell coming out so I figured it was related to the CPU. Need a different kind of paste?
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a c 98 à CPUs
October 8, 2009 7:03:40 PM

Who knows what you fried. You do NOT put the thermal paste in the CPU socket. The paste goes on the top of the CPU between it and the heat sink. That's what helps transfer heat from the CPU to the HSF.
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October 8, 2009 7:05:09 PM

Awwwwww man........ my fears have come true... you may have to get a whole new CPU/Mobo. It is very important to do research and read the manuals before doing anything!

Tsk tsk, we can't help you much now. Sorry for your loss... :( 
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October 8, 2009 7:08:12 PM

What is going on here?? The manual just said to apply the paste to the CPU, it didn't specify top or bottom! How is the CPU held in there if it's just flailing about aimlessly? Did you look at the link I posted to my mobo to verify you're giving me the right information?
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October 8, 2009 7:10:26 PM

You put the CPU in the socket, close the socket holder, and apply the thermal paste on top of the CPU. The HSF will attach on top of the CPU which uses the thermal paste to transfer heat from the CPU to the HSF.

It is used EVERY mobo/cpu. You never put anything between the pins and the socket, ever.
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a c 98 à CPUs
October 8, 2009 7:11:35 PM

You put thermal paste on the bottom of a CPU and you're asking us if we're sure we're giving correct information? That's a common-knowledge type thing. The CPU is held into the socket by the bar you press down after installing the CPU. The HSF also helps secure the CPU. There has never been a CPU that required anything between it and the motherboard socket.
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October 8, 2009 7:12:49 PM

I figured it was used in every mobo, but I'm pretty sure you put it INTO the motherboard socket so the CPU fits in there. If you put it on top of the cpu it will smudge when you clamp the heatsink on top of it. Again, are you sure things don't operate this way for my mobo? The manual was a little cryptic but I believe I did it per the instructions (depending on how you interpret them).
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a c 98 à CPUs
October 8, 2009 7:19:30 PM

Pages 13 - 15 in your motherboard manual have very clear instructions on how to install the CPU. It even has pretty little pictures. Let me quote:

1-3-1 Installing the CPU

Step 1:
Completely lift up the CPU socket locking lever.

Step 2:
Align the CPU pin one (small triangle marking) with the triangle mark on the CPU socket and gently insert the CPU into the socket. Make sure that the CPU pins fit perfectly into their holes. Once the CPU is positioned into its socket, place one finger down on the middle of the CPU, lowering the locking lever and latching it into the fully locked position. (That's what secures the CPU in the socket, thus the name, "locking lever")

1-3-2 Installing the CPU Cooler

Step 1:
Apply an even and thin layer of thermal grease on the surface of the installed CPU.

Step 2:
Place the CPU cooler on the CPU.

Step 3:
Hook the CPU cooler clip to the mounting lug on one side of the retention frame. On the other side,push straight down on the the CPU cooler clip to hook it to the mounting lug on the retention frame.

Step 4:
Turn the cam handle from the left side to the right side (as the picture above shows) to lock into place. (Refer to your CPU cooler installation manual for instructions on installing the cooler.)

Step 5:
Finally, attach the power connector of the CPU cooler to the CPU fan header (CPU_FAN) on the motherboard.

Notice that NOWHERE does it EVER say to install thermal paste before installing the CPU.

There's nothing cryptic about those instructions. It also doesn't leave much up to "interpretation". That's about as clear as it could possibly be.
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October 8, 2009 7:35:33 PM

asymptote said:
I thought you put the paste in the socket and then put the CPU in to kind of glue it together.


Oh no.

That's a hard lesson to learn.
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October 8, 2009 7:38:46 PM

asymptote said:
I figured it was used in every mobo, but I'm pretty sure you put it INTO the motherboard socket so the CPU fits in there. If you put it on top of the cpu it will smudge when you clamp the heatsink on top of it. Again, are you sure things don't operate this way for my mobo? The manual was a little cryptic but I believe I did it per the instructions (depending on how you interpret them).


The job of the pins is to interface with the motherboard. The heat is produced INSIDE of the processor and needs to be transferred into the heatsink. Thermal paste\glue\pads make the connection between the TOP of the processor and the heatsink so that heat can transfer up into the heastsink.

Putting the thermal compound into the socket\bottom of processor is absolutely the wrong thing to do.


Yes:




If possible, please take a picture of what you have done. This is not for diagnostic purposes, but more for you, so you can laugh at yourself later on when you're more experienced. Also, please post the picture here, as we will find this amusing. (not to rub it in your face, but there's no sense in wasting such a comical situation and not sharing it so at least we can enjoy it)
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October 8, 2009 8:03:38 PM

asymptote said:
I figured it was used in every mobo, but I'm pretty sure you put it INTO the motherboard socket so the CPU fits in there. If you put it on top of the cpu it will smudge when you clamp the heatsink on top of it. Again, are you sure things don't operate this way for my mobo? The manual was a little cryptic but I believe I did it per the instructions (depending on how you interpret them).


Oh dear, it's always a good idea to look up how to build a PC on the internet, or have a knowledgeable friend help. Failing that there are some decent instructions in the motherboard manual, and I'm pretty sure the CPU comes with some sort of diagram too. The purpose of thermal paste is not to make a connection between the CPU and the motherboard (depending on the paste in question's conductivity you may have short circuited the CPU and/or the MOBO, and even if you didn't good luck removing it). Thermal paste is applied in a thin layer between the CPU and heat sink, it fills in the small gaps that are created by the uneven surfaces of the CPU and heat sink, thus improving the movement of heat out of the CPU and into the heat sink.
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October 8, 2009 9:28:50 PM

Well I'm chinese and I downloaded the chinese version - I think I misinterpreted the directions. I'm going to try cleaning out the socket and seeing if I can get the paste out and trying again. I'll let you know how it goes.
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a b à CPUs
October 8, 2009 9:34:42 PM

Clean everything out with alcohol and try to RMA the parts if you can, worth a shot.

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