Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Connecting an HDTV as a second monitor

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
Anonymous
a b U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
July 31, 2009 7:53:50 PM

I am building a computer for my parents and they want to use it to watch movies. I have never hooked up an HDTV to a computer and am wondering if I can hook it up as though it was a second monitor and have it as a clone to their regular LCD. Also, by doing this will I need a beefy video card (like an NVIDIA 280 series)?
a c 155 U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
July 31, 2009 10:52:15 PM

No, you won't need a beefy graphics card. My HTPC is currently hooked up to my 32" HDTV (via and DVI --> HDMI cable) and to my projector (via a DVI --> VGA adapter and a lengthy VGA cable). The HTPC in question has an ATI Radeon HD2600Pro installed. I'd probably recommend an ATI Radeon HD4350 for your system. Low power requirements and should be enough to power both displays without issue.

-Wolf sends
m
0
l
August 1, 2009 1:05:39 PM

Dont't forget if you want to use "clone" mode both displays need to be set to the same resolution. I've used a hdtv (though only 720p) linked to my pc for some years and it's great, media centre with the (free) "my movies" software works very well (i have nearly 400 films and mymovies will download film info and allow you to select films by genre, rating etc). Link below:

http://www.mymovies.dk/
m
0
l
August 1, 2009 1:09:47 PM

Quote:
I am building a computer for my parents and they want to use it to watch movies. I have never hooked up an HDTV to a computer and am wondering if I can hook it up as though it was a second monitor and have it as a clone to their regular LCD. Also, by doing this will I need a beefy video card (like an NVIDIA 280 series)?


Some of the newer video cards have HDMI outputs, if you're planning on using the TV's speakers. Just go to Newegg.com and search for HDMI video card. For example, the ATI 4870 from MSI has an HDMI output as well as the usual RGB 15-pin D connector. I suggest you stick with a digital output to the TV rather than analog RGB, assuming your HDTV has both types. Blu-Ray has HDCP copy protection but that shouldn't be a problem, although you may have to set the TV as your primary display in Windows Vista or 7, instead of cloning the image as you mentioned.

You should set the TV input to dot-for-dot (no scaling) and may have to adjust the overscan too, unless there's a PC setting, so that the image exactly fills the screen.
m
0
l
!