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Gigabyte MA790X-UD4P (unlocking 4th core RISKS)

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July 11, 2009 9:16:05 PM

Is there any risk to damaging the hardware in my case if I tried to unlock the fourth core? I've heard of possible BSOD, etc...but not of my hardware becoming damaged...before I tinker with it, I need to know. I am running stock speed on a Phenom II 720 and use a Dark Knight CPU cooler...


I KNOW THIS IS NOT THE PLACE TO ASK, BUT I LIVE ON THIS SUB-BOARD, NOT THE MOTHERBOARD ONE AND WOULD TRUST USERS HERE MORE SO THAN THERE...
July 11, 2009 9:41:31 PM

anyone? i could really use the help!
July 11, 2009 9:45:36 PM

I'm unsure really... but do keep in mind that these CPU's are designated as dual core rather than quad core usually because the spare cores failed stability tests so it may not be a good idea to use them under load, or at least that's what I've read.
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July 11, 2009 10:02:55 PM

It's not a warranteed action. It is not guaranteed to work. Either it works or it doesn't. You bought a triple core - that's warranteed.

Turn on ACC in bios, and it either happens or it does not. If a problem, turn off ACC in bios. It should boot normally.

I doubt it will blow up your pc or other hardware. If you are worried; don't go there. If you want a guaranteed quad, buy one. If you get lucky, congratulations.

The specs might be off slightly on the disabled core. It might not be at full speed - it could be anything. If it works, you can work with it thru AOD. Maybe the sky will open and all the angels come. :)  :)  :) 

There's not much more to say to my knowledge. It's a warranteed triple core. You should have CPU-Z to help read what's happening. before and after.

Some do, some don't. Some mobos do, some don't. Some just won't. Sometimes a bios upgrade can prevent it from happening - haha - there's a trap for you. :)  Bios upgrades are often unnecessary.

You already know this.

Yes, maybe your pc will burst into flames and you might have a near death experience - who knows?

I really doubt someone will hold your hand while you attempt this - perhaps you better not. Just wonder what if? :) 

I guess if you can't afford to blow it up; you better not.
July 11, 2009 10:12:23 PM

AMD's manufacturing process has very good yield. If specs are not within prescribed tolerances, rather than junk it, it becomes a dualcore or triplecore. It's actually a credit to AMD's process that they can do duals and triples. Some believe that some of these are "disabled deliberately" for marketing purposes. But they could be truly defective.

It's all off the beaten path - no guarantees. Guarantees cost full price.

Note that if you have sensitive data you cannot lose; this is not the way to go. But there's lots of scary stories.
July 12, 2009 1:10:29 AM

godsgift2dagame said:
Is there any risk to damaging the hardware in my case if I tried to unlock the fourth core? I've heard of possible BSOD, etc...but not of my hardware becoming damaged...before I tinker with it, I need to know. I am running stock speed on a Phenom II 720 and use a Dark Knight CPU cooler...


I KNOW THIS IS NOT THE PLACE TO ASK, BUT I LIVE ON THIS SUB-BOARD, NOT THE MOTHERBOARD ONE AND WOULD TRUST USERS HERE MORE SO THAN THERE...



There is a risk of burning out your cpu due to voltage leaks. I have read many posts and it seems everyone has a different opinion. Basically some people say that amd disabled the 4th core for no reason other than to be able to sell them as cheaper parts, while other people say they disabled it because it is actually a manufacturing defect and this way they can still sell them instead of scrapping them alltogether. I will tell you that i have the exact same motherboard and processor combo and with the f5 bios and only that bios was i able to unlock the 4th core. It was prime 95 stable for almost 24 hrs, I cant say you will have the same results but you can give it a try. I have since turned off the 4th core because when enabled the hardware monitor does not work and i am unable to read cpu temp info. I would say give it a try, but just be warned that even if it is stable it can shorten the life of your processor dramatically if it is in fact disabled due to a defect.
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