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SSD RAID 0 & HDD RAID 1: possible?

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April 7, 2011 10:01:24 AM

Hi all,

Can you have with one on-board RAID controller (Gigabyte UD4 P67 motherboard) with SSDs in RAID 1 and HDDs in RAID 0? Or would you need to have two controllers like the Gigabyte UD7 board which has both Intel and Marvell RAID controllers?

Thanks heaps.

More about : ssd raid hdd raid

a c 300 G Storage
April 7, 2011 1:32:06 PM

In theory, yes. However, there's a thread around here from someone who could not get that to work. If I find it, I'll put in a link (or you could look for it).

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April 8, 2011 1:51:11 AM

WyomingKnott said:
In theory, yes. However, there's a thread around here from someone who could not get that to work. If I find it, I'll put in a link (or you could look for it).


I did some research and found several people who managed to get it to work on a single controller fine. Apparently using the Intel Matrix system you can setup multiple arrays.
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a b G Storage
April 8, 2011 10:17:46 AM

Should be no problem. I too have a Gigabyte (ga35-p35c ds3r r.2) board and my hdd configuration was that way once.
You can even have two different raid systems (raid 0 & 1) on only a pair of hdds, thanks to Intel Matrix Raid.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Matrix_RAID
In this configuration one partition act as raid 0 (for OS), and the other as raid 1 (for data).
I tried that once on the same board too. And that was very stable as well.

Right now, I decided raid 1 is not worth the extra complexity, at least for my use. I do backup regularly though using Acronis TIH 2011. I only have an SSD raid 0 pair for OS.
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a b G Storage
April 8, 2011 2:28:31 PM

Yes of course it works - on a decent version of Intels MAtrix RAID controller. Kursun is right on the money - you can even do it on one pair of drives instead of two pair.

And to say there is someone on this forum who couldnt get it to work isnt a high threshold - this place is full of people who cant get basic things to work - like PSU's, bios', xfire....and on and on.....
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a b G Storage
April 8, 2011 3:18:25 PM

rainwilds said:
Hi all,

Can you have with one on-board RAID controller (Gigabyte UD4 P67 motherboard) with SSDs in RAID 1 and HDDs in RAID 0? Or would you need to have two controllers like the Gigabyte UD7 board which has both Intel and Marvell RAID controllers?

Thanks heaps.


BTW, I assume you really want the SSDs in raid 0 instead of raid 1 and what you wrote is a typo error.
I don't see any reason why one would want os in raid 1 and data on raid 0.
Os should be on a drive that has performance (ssds/raid 0) and data on a drive that has safety (raid 1).

I don't think raid 1 is essential for home pcs. It is probably more important for workplaces where the pc's (or servers) have to go on working despite the fact that one hdd may have poofed. On home pcs you may take your time and just restore the last backup. Raid 1 is not a replacement for regular backups. I would advice on using the ssd pair on raid 0 for os, use one of the hdds as a normal data drive, and the second hdd for backups (for both raid 0 ssd os drive and the data hdd).
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April 9, 2011 2:51:34 AM

Kursun said:
BTW, I assume you really want the SSDs in raid 0 instead of raid 1 and what you wrote is a typo error.
I don't see any reason why one would want os in raid 1 and data on raid 0.
Os should be on a drive that has performance (ssds/raid 0) and data on a drive that has safety (raid 1).

I don't think raid 1 is essential for home pcs. It is probably more important for workplaces where the pc's (or servers) have to go on working despite the fact that one hdd may have poofed. On home pcs you may take your time and just restore the last backup. Raid 1 is not a replacement for regular backups. I would advice on using the ssd pair on raid 0 for os, use one of the hdds as a normal data drive, and the second hdd for backups (for both raid 0 ssd os drive and the data hdd).


Yeah, woops it was a mistake. RAID 0 for SSDs and 1 for HDDs. The reason I want to RAID 1 the HDDs is because of the CAD work I do that I want to ensure is backed up. I have being toying with the idea instead of getting a NAS or USB 3 external drive instead. What's your thoughts?
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a b G Storage
April 9, 2011 9:20:30 AM

rainwilds said:
Yeah, woops it was a mistake. RAID 0 for SSDs and 1 for HDDs. The reason I want to RAID 1 the HDDs is because of the CAD work I do that I want to ensure is backed up. I have being toying with the idea instead of getting a NAS or USB 3 external drive instead. What's your thoughts?


I had once had bad experience with raid 1. Raid 1 deteriorated and I had lost data on both drives. Maybe it works more dependably on more sophisticated server systems.

NAS would be very nice. I hope to invest in one if they cost less. Right now they are priced above the clouds.

I find portable external drives least dependable, as they are susceptible to knocks.
I think internal drives are more dependable -provided your pc has a very good quality power supply.

And one more important thing: if you use any dedicated backup hdd, don't let it spin around needlessly all the time your pc is on. My backup hdd is in a portable hdd carriage tray similar to this one:
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

Mine has a front panel switch. Although I never take the hdd out (outside world has more risks of accidents), I switch the backup hdd off when it is not in use. If you buy one be sure it has an on off switch and/or it's hot-swap type. I have heard horror stories that happen when people just pull out a working hdd. My hdd tray has its on-off switch mechanically linked to its pull out handle. It can't be pulled out without first shutting it off.
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April 10, 2011 10:24:33 AM

Kursun said:
I had once had bad experience with raid 1. Raid 1 deteriorated and I had lost data on both drives. Maybe it works more dependably on more sophisticated server systems.

NAS would be very nice. I hope to invest in one if they cost less. Right now they are priced above the clouds.

I find portable external drives least dependable, as they are susceptible to knocks.
I think internal drives are more dependable -provided your pc has a very good quality power supply.

And one more important thing: if you use any dedicated backup hdd, don't let it spin around needlessly all the time your pc is on. My backup hdd is in a portable hdd carriage tray similar to this one:
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

Mine has a front panel switch. Although I never take the hdd out (outside world has more risks of accidents), I switch the backup hdd off when it is not in use. If you buy one be sure it has an on off switch and/or it's hot-swap type. I have heard horror stories that happen when people just pull out a working hdd. My hdd tray has its on-off switch mechanically linked to its pull out handle. It can't be pulled out without first shutting it off.


Funny you mention your external hdd case. I've decided to get the best of both backup worlds. Getting three Samsung F3 HDDs putting two in RAID 1 in PC with good PSU; and one in this external hdd case: http://www.noontec.com.au/?m=Product&v=Default&i=19

That way I don't need to leave the external drive running all the time. Plus I have some old drives that it would be handy accessing. It actually works out cheaper to building an external drive then to by one like a WD My Book or something.
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April 17, 2011 4:14:19 AM

Best answer selected by rainwilds.
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