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To those with the hyper 212 +

Tags:
  • Heatsinks
  • Cooling
  • Thermal Compound
  • CPUs
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
August 2, 2011 6:55:28 AM

I've got a question with applying the thermal paste how did you go about doing it after looking at the directions that came with the cpu cooler it seems that I don't apply it to the cpu it self but to the cooler then put put the cooler on my cpu if any one can confirm these are the correct steps or at lest one of the right ways foror me that would be great

thanks!

(sorry if this has been asked if so please point me in the right forum)

More about : hyper 212

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August 2, 2011 7:29:26 AM

I think it will be fine since the heatsink will be in direct contact with the CPU. I usually just apply a dime size thermal paste onto the middle of the CPU and then install the heatsink. After I seated the heatsink, I would wiggle it a little to further spread out the thermal paste. If you did something like that to your heatsink first, you will be fine. Same effect, different procedures.
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August 2, 2011 1:44:04 PM

cool
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a b à CPUs
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August 3, 2011 11:30:57 AM

Makes very little difference as long as you apply the correct amount and it all ends up between the heatsink and the cpu itself. When you tighten down the CPU HeatSink it will spread the paste out underneath giving a nice contact area between HeatSink-Thermal Paste-CPU
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August 3, 2011 12:14:39 PM

AdrianPerry said:
If you're not concerned about getting the best possible performance from your cooler, it Makes very little difference as long as you apply the correct amount and it all ends up between the heatsink and the cpu itself. When you tighten down the CPU HeatSink it will spread the paste out underneath giving a nice contact area between HeatSink-Thermal Paste-CPU and create air pockets in the voids of the HDT cooler

Fixed that for you
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August 3, 2011 7:45:28 PM

LOL Saint, I wish you posted that two days earlier. I mounted my cm 212 plus three different ways this week and was within 2 to 3c between the worst to the best. The fill in the gaps and the line method seemed to work the best, but only a couple/few degrees better at most.
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August 4, 2011 9:19:02 AM

delluser1 said:
Fixed that for you


Air pockets are going to occur any-which way you apply the paste. Air is everywhere. Providing the CPU is correctly fastned down the thermal paste is going to be squashed out from under the heatsink in every direction. Hence AMOUNT of paste applied is more important than the pretty pattern you decide to apply.

As far as the Hyper 212+ goes, im pretty sure it comes applied with 3 lines.

EDIT: If there was one guaranteed method that's better than the rest, surely everyone would use it? Manufacturers would ship with the paste pre-applied with this magical pattern? But no, there's a number of different application methods, and they are all as good as each other.

EDIT2: The link below shows a number of ways CPU paste was applied, a 1-2 degree margin was allowed for room temp changes/margin of error. As shown in the chart the ONLY method that resulted in more than 1-2 degrees difference was applying TOO MUCH paste. Not the pattern it was applied in. http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/What-is-the-Best...

QUOTE: "The quantity of thermal compound seems to be the key variable that defines a good application."
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August 4, 2011 11:08:22 AM

Thanks Adrian for that link...very interesting article/chart
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a b K Overclocking
August 4, 2011 9:43:30 PM

huron said:
Thanks Adrian for that link...very interesting article/chart

I agree that it's interesting, too bad they didn't use an HDT type cooler, then it would have some bearing on this thread.
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a b K Overclocking
August 5, 2011 7:26:21 AM

Many H.D.T coolers have the heat-sink/pipes filed flat at the base anyway so the method would be exactly the same. For those that don't have a flat, smoothed heat-sink the cooling more than likely wont be as good full stop since there will be less surface area for heat transfer. More thermal paste would be required in order to ensure maximum surface area coverage.

However, as shown in the tests, dont use TOO much.

EDIT:
Wiki's explanation:
"increases the thermal conductivity of a thermal interface by filling microscopic air-gaps present due to the imperfectly flat and smooth surfaces of the components; the compound has far greater thermal conductivity than air (but far less than metal). In electronics, it is often used to aid a component's thermal dissipation via a heat sink."

---------

ALL the paste is doing is increasing surface area to minimize the transfer of heat by air. HOWEVER, the paste is LESS conductive than the metal of the heat-sink.

Therefore: Too much paste would equal slower heat dissipation, too less wouldn't cover a sufficient area meaning some heat would be transferred by air which is slower. The whole idea behind the paste is to maximise heat transfer by not having too much paste that slows it down, or too little that it doesn't cover the whole area.

Method of application it totally irrelevant.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
August 5, 2011 11:51:31 AM

Oh how I love the noobs
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a c 174 à CPUs
a c 311 K Overclocking
August 5, 2011 1:52:20 PM

AdrianPerry said:
Many H.D.T coolers have the heat-sink/pipes filed flat at the base anyway so the method would be exactly the same. For those that don't have a flat, smoothed heat-sink the cooling more than likely wont be as good full stop since there will be less surface area for heat transfer. More thermal paste would be required in order to ensure maximum surface area coverage.

However, as shown in the tests, dont use TOO much.

EDIT:
Wiki's explanation:
"increases the thermal conductivity of a thermal interface by filling microscopic air-gaps present due to the imperfectly flat and smooth surfaces of the components; the compound has far greater thermal conductivity than air (but far less than metal). In electronics, it is often used to aid a component's thermal dissipation via a heat sink."

---------

ALL the paste is doing is increasing surface area to minimize the transfer of heat by air. HOWEVER, the paste is LESS conductive than the metal of the heat-sink.

Therefore: Too much paste would equal slower heat dissipation, too less wouldn't cover a sufficient area meaning some heat would be transferred by air which is slower. The whole idea behind the paste is to maximise heat transfer by not having too much paste that slows it down, or too little that it doesn't cover the whole area.

Method of application it totally irrelevant.


Take sometime to test that and let us know the results.


delluser1 said:
Oh how I love the noobs


+10000000
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