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Can you configure raid with SSD and 7200 SATA III HD?

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  • SATA
  • NAS / RAID
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Last response: in Storage
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April 10, 2011 10:24:14 PM

I am putting in a new SSD 128 GB SATA III 6.0 and bought a Hatachi 2 TB 6.0 for my new build thinking it would speed right along. Wrong. The hitachi is only as fast as the platters spin at 7200 rpms and you get no faster data rate as if it were SATA II. My question is can I set up a raid configuration using my new SSD as primary and the Hitachi partitioned off in RAID? Would it be something like 0,1? And will this just slow everything down to where I will not benifit from the SSD at all. My WEI are 7.5,7.5,7.5,7.7,5.6 because of the HDD situation. My ASUS mobo M4A88TD-V EVO USB3.0 SATA III 6.0 with a Phenom II 965 OC'd to 4.0 and Kingston Value ram OC'd to 1600 with 2 Sapphire HD 5770's OC'd to 950 @1225 clock. I get a Heaven benchmark 2.5 of 943 running it this way and just want games and OS on SSD, well a couple utilities as that is all the room I can afford now that I have to pay for this monster. And is there such a thing as having too many HDD's? I have a 2 TB, 500GB, 320Gb, and adding 128 SSD. Do I need to get rid of one or two? I have a Antec NEW Truepower 750 modular pushing everything with a Noctua NH-D14 sitting on top my 965 that is in the way of everything.:bounce:  Had to remove 4 fans to get that monster in and replace with very loud high CFM fans to keep cool, but in spare bedroom and I hear nothing as I have everything routed to my HDTV in the livingroom. Thanks for your time folks. :hello: 

More about : configure raid ssd 7200 sata iii

a c 324 G Storage
April 10, 2011 10:36:59 PM

Short answer to the main question: You can, but you shouldn't. It will give you the worst of both worlds; the capacity of two 128 GB drives and the speed of two hard drives. If this were the memory forum, Jaquith would have already posted benchmarks showing how badly it works.

The SATA III interface on hard drives is sort of future-proofing; there are no hard drives yet that can saturate an SATA II interface. But II and III are perfectly compatible, so that you will get II speeds when you connect one to the other.

Now the serious question: What do you want to do with that machine that it's not fast enough for yet? What you want to run faster, and your budget, will determine what you should change.

================================================

I'm going to digress with a story. Almost two decades ago, I lead a team that was replacing a critical part of my company's business code, because the current code was taking too long to run and was going to be the limiting factor on our business within six months.

The plan was to write a prototype and verify the logic first, then tune the bejesus out of it and get it fast enough to support the business for a few more years. Our prototype ran in one-fourth of the time that the business needed as an upper limit, so it was "fast enough" and never got tuned.

Knowing what you are trying to optimize for is important to choosing what to optimize.
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April 10, 2011 10:58:10 PM

Mostly for the OS to load more quickly and games to load better. I will be converting video also, but doub't that will have any impact on using a new SSD. I wanted to also make sure it is backed up what goes on there. Would a 64 Gb be big enough for what few games I have and Windows 7 64 signature addition? If wo, I could RAID those, right? for the same price.
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a b G Storage
April 11, 2011 1:02:11 AM

Here's your problem: You installed Windows to your 2TB drive. Reinstall it to the SSD. The 5.6 is for your primary hard drive. It only tests the drive windows is installed on.

WEI is just for fun--it really is a terrible gauge of performance. Nonetheless, I still like to say I get 7.9's on the middle 3 scores.
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a b G Storage
April 11, 2011 4:20:57 AM

pjmoses said:
Mostly for the OS to load more quickly and games to load better. I will be converting video also, but doub't that will have any impact on using a new SSD. I wanted to also make sure it is backed up what goes on there. Would a 64 Gb be big enough for what few games I have and Windows 7 64 signature addition? If wo, I could RAID those, right? for the same price.



While 64GB would probably provide enough free space after that install, it would remain to be seen as to whether or not that video work would degrade the drive too quickly forcing increased maintenance due to limited free space/fresh block reserves. I would recommend a 120GB drive if larger data sets like that are to be used since capacity is the best defense against degradation of SSD. Either that or you better have some aggressive GC on the drive with plenty of logged off idle time for it to kick in effectively.

I work with large data sets like that and I'm just trying to save you some headaches since I've been there before, is all. Good luck with it.
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a b G Storage
April 11, 2011 5:51:42 AM

For industrial use, they produce the flash drives with larger spare sectors that may be useful for work with large data sets.

For typical home usage, a 64GB drive has enough spare sectors for several years anyways. Considering no one will be using a 64GB flash drive much in 3 or 4 years (because we'll use 500GB ones), I don't see any reason to worry about the degradation over time. Flash drives are purchased with the expectation to replace them in a couple years.
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a b G Storage
April 11, 2011 6:22:15 AM

I was talking about performance degradation. Not lifespan as I too won't want these drives in 3 years either since they'll be handed down to netbooks, PS3's, or portable storage anyways. Static data(OS/apps) plus OP space will not give much left over to avoid erase before write penalties would be incurred.

This is where capacity comes into play as stamina is much improved with larger data sets since trim and GC can only do so much with current firmware. While much better than it used to be.. SSD firmware is still not perfect yet.
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a b G Storage
April 11, 2011 6:32:11 AM

groberts101 said:
While much better than it used to be.. SSD firmware is still not perfect yet.
That is exactly why I haven't bought an SSD yet. I'll stick with my 3x Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB RAID 0/5 arrays with 425MB/s / 225MB/s read for now. Maybe on Black Friday or for a laptop though?

SSDs in RAID 0--worth it for home usage? The reviews I've read refer to industrial usage.
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Best solution

a c 324 G Storage
April 11, 2011 1:36:45 PM

In regards to performance degradation from video editing, I disagree.

1) If the OS is installed on the SSD, the video data and application scratch area are on the hard drive(s), and there is enough physical memory to minimize swapping, the massive IO of video editing won't be on the SSD.

2) Large amounts of activity to the SSD will not, on a properly built and used SSD, degrade performance. "Built:" It should support TRIM and ideally garbage collection. "Used:" Only Windows 7, and the motherboard chipset set to AHCI controller mode, and the drives not in a RAID set, so that the TRIM command will go through.

===============

Other points: My 40 GB partition (on my 128 GB SSD) was big enough for Win7 and a few apps. Installing SP1 brought me up to about 38 GB, and I had to resize the partition. The "problem" is the solution to "DLL Hell," in which all versions of a given dll are stored in the "Side by side" directory, /windows/winsxs. Apply an 8 GB patch, you use up 8 GB of space, since nothing is purged as being an old version.

Yes, you can now rollback SP1, but if you don't intend to, you have a lot of space that I consider wasted. For Vista, uSoft released a tool to purge the files needed to rollback SP1, but XP doesn't have it. So I'm thinking that 64 GB may be tight in a year or so.

======================

The following suggestion is based on my understanding of the working of a properly fed and cared-for SSD. That understanding is that TRIM, garbage collection, and 4 KB alignment are sufficient to maintain performance at near-peak levels until cells start dying from wear. If that interpretation is correct:

Many programs that process large amounts of data, such as video editing, use large scratch spaces on disk. If you want the process to run faster, put those scratch spaces on the SSD (buy a larger one). Even if it does make the drive wear out sooner, you will get much more bang for your buck when not only does your program load faster but your images transcode faster too.

The best bang for the buck is more memory if the app can use it. Data that is never swapped to a drive scratch file, be it SSD or hard drive, will slow things down. Some people actually put in extra memory and create a memory drive, then designate that memory drive as the scratch drive for the app. Result: app runs faster.

Here's a heresy: If the app is using all available memory efficiently, put your video files on a (large) SSD. Sure, the thing will wear out relatively soon, but imagine having the editing and transcoding processes reading and writing data at SSD speeds.

==================

I hope that I have provided food for thought, if not a precise answer. Note specifically that, with current chipsets and drivers, the TRIM command cannot be passed to SSDs in a RAID set and performance will degrade. There is a possible exception for RAID sets that have long idle periods daily and are built from SSDs with excellent garbage collection, but I wouldn't try it with current generations of hardware.
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April 11, 2011 2:27:42 PM

WyomingKnott said:
In regards to performance degradation from video editing, I disagree.

1) If the OS is installed on the SSD, the video data and application scratch area are on the hard drive(s), and there is enough physical memory to minimize swapping, the massive IO of video editing won't be on the SSD.

2) Large amounts of activity to the SSD will not, on a properly built and used SSD, degrade performance. "Built:" It should support TRIM and ideally garbage collection. "Used:" Only Windows 7, and the motherboard chipset set to AHCI controller mode, and the drives not in a RAID set, so that the TRIM command will go through.

===============

Other points: My 40 GB partition (on my 128 GB SSD) was big enough for Win7 and a few apps. Installing SP1 brought me up to about 38 GB, and I had to resize the partition. The "problem" is the solution to "DLL Hell," in which all versions of a given dll are stored in the "Side by side" directory, /windows/winsxs. Apply an 8 GB patch, you use up 8 GB of space, since nothing is purged as being an old version.

Yes, you can now rollback SP1, but if you don't intend to, you have a lot of space that I consider wasted. For Vista, uSoft released a tool to purge the files needed to rollback SP1, but XP doesn't have it. So I'm thinking that 64 GB may be tight in a year or so.

======================

The following suggestion is based on my understanding of the working of a properly fed and cared-for SSD. That understanding is that TRIM, garbage collection, and 4 KB alignment are sufficient to maintain performance at near-peak levels until cells start dying from wear. If that interpretation is correct:

Many programs that process large amounts of data, such as video editing, use large scratch spaces on disk. If you want the process to run faster, put those scratch spaces on the SSD (buy a larger one). Even if it does make the drive wear out sooner, you will get much more bang for your buck when not only does your program load faster but your images transcode faster too.

The best bang for the buck is more memory if the app can use it. Data that is never swapped to a drive scratch file, be it SSD or hard drive, will slow things down. Some people actually put in extra memory and create a memory drive, then designate that memory drive as the scratch drive for the app. Result: app runs faster.

Here's a heresy: If the app is using all available memory efficiently, put your video files on a (large) SSD. Sure, the thing will wear out relatively soon, but imagine having the editing and transcoding processes reading and writing data at SSD speeds.

==================

I hope that I have provided food for thought, if not a precise answer. Note specifically that, with current chipsets and drivers, the TRIM command cannot be passed to SSDs in a RAID set and performance will degrade. There is a possible exception for RAID sets that have long idle periods daily and are built from SSDs with excellent garbage collection, but I wouldn't try it with current generations of hardware.



I will just go with one 128 gig SSD and backup on my 2Tb Hatachi for the inevitable failure of the SSD. Watching what I say on here, I get a lot of video in several different formats and like to change them over so I can store on BD for future playback and lifetime saves. That is where the editing comes in. I am just mostly changing formats for BD storage. Though I have yet to get the burner. Heck, I even have a Toshiba HD-DVD H30 with a few movies and would like to find a way to reformat them to go on a BD. Like I said I have to watch what I say on here, but for now I am storing all my movies on harddrives until I get my BD burner in another month. Then I will be able to keep everything clean and just have a HUGE collection of HD movies. So forget about RAID and I have almost all my software on disk anyway for total system failure. I also have that Signature addition of Windows 7 Ultimate that has some stuff on there that I did not know about until I started opening some of the files that are there, just not installed. You guys are great and this is my first build from the ground up since the pre-IBM days when Radio Shack ruled. So I am catching up fast. But what exactly does the TRIM do? And do I have a special setting for AHCI controller mode because of my mobo, or is it a Windows 7 feature?
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a b G Storage
April 11, 2011 2:39:51 PM

couldn't disagree with most of that, but the fact remains that GC/trim is not aggressive enough on some models still out there(easy to see on a quick search of mfgrs forums) to support those that don't give it sufficient recovery time and many simply don't understand this need increases as the data set sizes go up(vids are the worst due to size). Have to remember that not everyone fully understands these things and just plugs em' in and uses them expecting the drive to never slow down. Doing that on smaller capacity drives with over 50%(many go beyond 70% full) of the space filled with static data(OS/apps) can and often does(I often help a dozen per week with that very problem) result in performance losses with subsequent posts in mfgrs forums wondering "what's wrong with my SSD?".

Personally, I don't understand why everyone wants to scratch data away from their SSD to get that last 3 mos. of lifespan(<<a little drama there) when that was the entire point of buying the SSD in the first place. If cash/capacity is limited I surely "get it", but I often see those who have larger drives moving swap, temp, and even creating symbolic links to everything possible without realizing the sheer number of Terabytes worth of data that can be written to the drive before lifespan is an issue.

Personally, I use wider arrays of SSD to avoid any concerns for any of those tweaks. If it can reduce OS resource usage/hardware overhead I'm usually all over it with the typical tweaks but aside from that I actually try to write to my array whenever possible due to the time saved in the long run. IMHO, most lose sight of the main reason to buy SSD in the first place which is... time saved. I'm busy enough, my system helps me make more money, and have small kids so time is of the greatest priority to me and SSD lets me have some back that would normally be wasted. It'll cost ya of course,.. but the option is there if implemented correctly.

IMO, most underestimate the benefit of faster storage when the data sets are large enough and can save more time with a good raid card with 8 x HDD than a small snappy SSD that moves all the writes away to another single slow HDD. It depends on the amount of time spent writing to the drives of course so, YMMV.

Aside from that, if SSD cannot be leveraged to the point of being able to scratch larger data sets(the aforementioned capacity requirements), it would be far better to spend the cash on more ram and use ramdisks(or Fancycache which is actually very affective at creating a large virtual ramdisks out of the c-drive/OS volume) to get the best bang for the buck. Fancycache can even defer the writes to enable fewer sporadic random streams from hitting the drive and therefor have a greater chance of reducing degradation and also increasing the chance of contiguous file writes to the physical space of an SSD. Many SSD firmwares are now smart enough to optimize physical file structure these days given the fact that even though there is low latency, it's not the same as ..no latency.. and even SSD still hates random data and read/write splits will lower the overall performance of all current SSD however improved they may be. Sandforce drives for example, have the ability to actually speed up beyond fresh install speeds from that very ability itself. Internal file optimization/mapping is another strongpoint of such a smart and complex controller.

Every little bit helps cumulatively and my fast array combined with fast storage sprinkled with 10 gigs of Fancycache benefit, is a about as "best of all worlds" as can be had right now. This is the perspective that I typically advise from without the nose in the air attitude that usually come along with it. In the end it just boils down to a perspective on time, available funds, and the data sets at hand. Everyone's different and the overall hardware setup just needs to be tuned off those parameters, is all.
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a b G Storage
April 11, 2011 2:48:51 PM

trim just marks the blocks for a subsequent recycling back into the fresh block pool(your write reserve/stamina). However, not all controllers make use of the commands in immediate fashion and rely on lower activity states to make use of them and return them to clean states. This is where some logoff idle time can allow sufficient low resource usage time for GC to occur. Have to just study the mfgrs forum for the particular drive in question and modify usage/maintenance to bets suit your usage environment, is all.


and yes, AHCI must be set in the bios for Windows to leverage it's built in MSAHCI drivers for full benefits from an SSD. Many now realize the benefits of NCQ on an SSD and AHCI should be used whenever possible to gain its benefits. Some systems do not have a specific AHCI bios setting and will list either IDE or RAID mode. In that case use riad mode even when using single drives as it will effectively run in AHCI mode since raid is a subset of AHCI. Good Luck with it all.

PS. many of those data sets are temp scratched to the SSD as you edit and work on the files(demendant on the programs used and the ability to configure such things) so I would highly recommend giving Fancycache a try to reduce the affects on the SSD. Can help stamina and reduce the idle time/recovery requirements after the fact.
http://www.romexsoftware.com/en-us/fancy-cache/
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April 11, 2011 3:15:41 PM

I actually understand most of this! My mobo's BIOS should support AHCI and will check on next boot. But I am getting a SSD for the right reason - basic read and write times increase almost exponentially and the temp scratching is what leads to eventual lifespan failure. So I have space for an extra 8 gigs of ram for ramdisk and after I pay some of this off will go that route as well. I know I could not afford and Intel gooberfast CPU, but to be honest, this 965 OC'd to 4.0 is quite pleasing compared to others I have owned. And the SATA 6.0 controller on the mobo w/USB 3.0 ready should last longer than everything else. Just wish AMD would keep the AM3 chipset. Could get another 2 years out of it that way. So I got a good handle on how to set it up and what to do with it to keep it running smooth. Another 5 years and the platters will be gone. Thanks again Guys!
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April 11, 2011 4:46:14 PM

groberts101 said:
trim just marks the blocks for a subsequent recycling back into the fresh block pool(your write reserve/stamina). However, not all controllers make use of the commands in immediate fashion and rely on lower activity states to make use of them and return them to clean states. This is where some logoff idle time can allow sufficient low resource usage time for GC to occur. Have to just study the mfgrs forum for the particular drive in question and modify usage/maintenance to bets suit your usage environment, is all.


and yes, AHCI must be set in the bios for Windows to leverage it's built in MSAHCI drivers for full benefits from an SSD. Many now realize the benefits of NCQ on an SSD and AHCI should be used whenever possible to gain its benefits. Some systems do not have a specific AHCI bios setting and will list either IDE or RAID mode. In that case use riad mode even when using single drives as it will effectively run in AHCI mode since raid is a subset of AHCI. Good Luck with it all.

PS. many of those data sets are temp scratched to the SSD as you edit and work on the files(demendant on the programs used and the ability to configure such things) so I would highly recommend giving Fancycache a try to reduce the affects on the SSD. Can help stamina and reduce the idle time/recovery requirements after the fact.
http://www.romexsoftware.com/en-us/fancy-cache/


My mobo supports AHCI, but do I wait to switch it until after I load OS on new SSD? Or switch it now? I can't get it until I get out of the hospital next month. I am getting a SATA III @ Newegg http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... Hope it is fast as advertised. WOW!
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a c 324 G Storage
April 11, 2011 4:50:28 PM

Don't switch it now. The drivers for AHCI won't be in your Windows install, and it will not boot. If you really want to do that, there are workarounds. But the most solid course is to attach the new SSD and only the new SSD, set AHCI (or RAID) mode, and install Win7.
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April 11, 2011 4:55:56 PM

Got it. When installing first time after unhooking other drives and connecting new SSD, on boot, switch to AHCI, then install Win 7. Thanks EVERYONE!
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a b G Storage
April 11, 2011 10:48:01 PM

I'd get a Vertex 3 over that Plextor. Slightly faster Reads and over double on Writes.
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April 12, 2011 1:50:41 PM

Quote:
do you have the intel sata 3 controller? the other controllers arent fast enough and cause performance degradation.

Can I even run Intel controllers on this AMD setup? I am using the ASUS ones that came with the mobo.
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April 13, 2011 12:38:44 PM

Best answer selected by pjmoses.
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April 13, 2011 1:45:56 PM

Quote:
is your sata3 controller made by marvell? if yes, the performance will be lower compared to intel sata3 controller.


Correct me if I am wrong, but don't the controllers come with the SSD's. If not, where do I look to find out what I have on my M4A88TD-V EVO USB3.0 SATA III 6.0

I also read that even the Intel SSD's are using the Marvell controllers over their own. I would not think if there is some controll over which controller I use, my AMD setup would not use an Intel controller. I think. But as I am new to the SSD world, I do not know. I have found out that one of the most important things is the random r/w 4k over overall Read and Write speeds, as that is used more often in grabbing data in nosequincial form. That is where your trim and GC come in while in idle to keep clean for the random access. Correct me if I am wrong, but when playing a game you use the 4k random r/w action most. I could handle 2 seconds slower boot time if my games are going to run glitch free.
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a b G Storage
April 13, 2011 5:31:31 PM

use the SB850 port on that board. can also try to use raidxpert(yes it can work with single drives) to enable NCQ and write caching for max speeds.

If using the V3 then it's still good practice to leave some unallocated space as overprovisioning will help stamina and recovery over the long term. Setting 10-20 gigs aside should be enough to keep things more efficient. Logoff idle times will help to recover dirty blocks after heavier write sessions as well. Also need to try and keep the drives stored data(OS/apps) below 75% to get best result over the long haul.

As for game requirements? I wouldn't get too much into all the speculation as to what better or required if you're buying top of the food chain SSD since they'll all perform about as good as you'll get these days. V3's are awesome drives by anyones standards, that's for sure. Good Luck with it all.
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April 13, 2011 5:53:50 PM

groberts101 said:
use the SB850 port on that board. can also try to use raidxpert(yes it can work with single drives) to enable NCQ and write caching for max speeds.

If using the V3 then it's still good practice to leave some unallocated space as overprovisioning will help stamina and recovery over the long term. Setting 10-20 gigs aside should be enough to keep things more efficient. Logoff idle times will help to recover dirty blocks after heavier write sessions as well. Also need to try and keep the drives stored data(OS/apps) below 75% to get best result over the long haul.

As for game requirements? I wouldn't get too much into all the speculation as to what better or required if you're buying top of the food chain SSD since they'll all perform about as good as you'll get these days. V3's are awesome drives by anyones standards, that's for sure. Good Luck with it all.


So you are saying to partition the 120GB to two 60 GB and raid 0 them? Or after OS install partition the drive and raid 0 the two partitions? Little confused on that as well as the onboard Marvell and Intell controllers. Where do I look to find out what I have? Once there I can figure out how to change it if need be, but all my SATA's are 6.0 and do they all run with one controller, or two, another for running 3.0 as well? The OCZ uses a Sandforce controller and which should my mobo be using to get the most out of it. You have tought me about the GC/trim and I have found out that the 4k random r/w is just important as the startup speed of read and write. But the random IOPS will be used more than anything, at least from what I have gathered. And that is where the trim comes in. Got that down. Now just figure out these controllers on my mobo and will be set.
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a b G Storage
April 13, 2011 8:10:49 PM

no you don't need to split partions and riad the single drive. I would set bios to raid mode and install the drive on the first sata port(should be your AMD chip but consult the manual/mfgrs website specs to be sure) then just install as usual(you'll need the raid drivers available on USB or disk during the install). Then install the raidxpert app and set the drive to single member raid. All this does in enables the app to have some controll over the previously mention settings(NCQ and write cache). Many have successfully used it on single drives to squeeze that last bit of performance out of them. May not work on all boards though, so you'd just have to try it first. Shouldn't botch the install and probably just won't "see" the drive or even install at all, if not compatible.

and don't confuse or merge the sata controllers with the SSD's controller since each one has it's own task and entirely seperate of one another. Hope that helps clarify it for you.
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April 13, 2011 9:37:46 PM

I still can not find where the controllers are located on my computer for the SATA drives. I checked bios, not there, disk management, not there either. Just where do I look to see what kind of controllers are loaded on my motherboard? And I thought you said to change my setting in BIOS under the SSD to AHCI controller mode? Why now to RAID 0? I have that setting. Is that not the one that helps keep it cleaned up? I already have the RAIDExpert program from the mobo CD. I just want the temporary to be cleaned on a constant basis for quick 4k random access. Is that what setting it on RAID will do? Does AHCI not take care of NCQ?

Don't forget to tell me where to find what kind of sata 6.0 controllers my mobo has. I am at a loss. ;) 
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April 13, 2011 9:52:28 PM

I also know what I am getting into as far as the return rate and DOA problems with OCZ. But there is bound to be a diamond out there and they are the fastest in every sector that I have found and compaired. Pricey little devil's though.
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a b G Storage
April 13, 2011 10:14:22 PM

OK. let's back up here and clarify a bit more. I'm an Intel kinda guy and haven't used AMD for years now. However, all my advice for your setup would be based on many friends/posts from those that use them.

To be honest, I'm not positive that you would even need to be in raid mode to allow the raidxpert app to be installed and used properly as I've seen others using single drives use it as well and am pretty sure they were set to ahci. I think not, but this I'm not sure of though and you'd really need to ask that particular question on the mobo mfgrs support forum to get a definitive answer.

As for the "trying to find the controllers"?.. they are the chips installed on your mobo that handles all the devices attached to it. here's your boards specs(look in the details).
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

You are running the SB850 sata chip on the board and should be able to look at reviews of it to be sure of what ports to connect to. Also can go to the mfgrs site and DL the manual too. Either way you go, you just need to be sure which ports your connecting to since there are sometimes alternate sata chips available. Not sure about your board(maybe they're ALL running off the SB850?) and you'd just have to double check to be sure.

And from everything I've read so far about NCQ and AMD drivers?.. yes NCQ should be enabled by default but once in raidxpert you will have the option of checking it for each drive attached. Just use it even though it may be redundant since it may be disabled by default once that driver/app is installed. Write-caching is the one you want also.

So in a nutshell here, you install the drive and run through the typical routine if set to ahci as Windows 7 will have all the necessary drivers to get you going. If you choose to set the bios to raid you may need the necessary drivers for Windows to see the drive at install(though I doubt that as well since you wouldn't have a riaded volume to detect using only a single drive). After you're up and running just use the disk that came with the mobo to get the other drivers and apps needed. If you have raidxpert on the utility disk then you should be compatible with it and good to go.

Sorry, wish I could give you more clear advice and was just trying to push you in the right direction to get the most out of the SSD. You may find that the raidxpert app isn't even needed with sufficient performance with the AMD drivers alone. Good Luck with it
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April 14, 2011 1:47:16 AM

groberts101 said:
OK. let's back up here and clarify a bit more. I'm an Intel kinda guy and haven't used AMD for years now. However, all my advice for your setup would be based on many friends/posts from those that use them.

To be honest, I'm not positive that you would even need to be in raid mode to allow the raidxpert app to be installed and used properly as I've seen others using single drives use it as well and am pretty sure they were set to ahci. I think not, but this I'm not sure of though and you'd really need to ask that particular question on the mobo mfgrs support forum to get a definitive answer.

As for the "trying to find the controllers"?.. they are the chips installed on your mobo that handles all the devices attached to it. here's your boards specs(look in the details).
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

You are running the SB850 sata chip on the board and should be able to look at reviews of it to be sure of what ports to connect to. Also can go to the mfgrs site and DL the manual too. Either way you go, you just need to be sure which ports your connecting to since there are sometimes alternate sata chips available. Not sure about your board(maybe they're ALL running off the SB850?) and you'd just have to double check to be sure.

And from everything I've read so far about NCQ and AMD drivers?.. yes NCQ should be enabled by default but once in raidxpert you will have the option of checking it for each drive attached. Just use it even though it may be redundant since it may be disabled by default once that driver/app is installed. Write-caching is the one you want also.

So in a nutshell here, you install the drive and run through the typical routine if set to ahci as Windows 7 will have all the necessary drivers to get you going. If you choose to set the bios to raid you may need the necessary drivers for Windows to see the drive at install(though I doubt that as well since you wouldn't have a riaded volume to detect using only a single drive). After you're up and running just use the disk that came with the mobo to get the other drivers and apps needed. If you have raidxpert on the utility disk then you should be compatible with it and good to go.

Sorry, wish I could give you more clear advice and was just trying to push you in the right direction to get the most out of the SSD. You may find that the raidxpert app isn't even needed with sufficient performance with the AMD drivers alone. Good Luck with it


Gotch ya, I think everything I need is on that CD that was with my mobo for all contingencies as all SATA connections, except 5 and 6 are AHCI capable and all are 6.0 ready and the same color. So as far as mobo is concerned, I think I will be OK. Now I just have to find a WORKING OCZ 120gb SATA III to load up and try as most are over priced or out of stock at the moment, but was waiting until next month anyhow. I am pointed straight with your help and thank you for it. I understand so much more now about what needs to be set and what it does. I have enough to go on and some benchmarks to play with to get the max out of it now. Just waiting on a good sale and stock from Newegg to come in. Thanks again. And the ASUS CD is loaded with more drivers if one is not working good.
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