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How high without breaking 95 watts?

Last response: in Overclocking
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August 12, 2011 9:26:36 AM

I found out I have a 95 watt tdp motherboard and because I don't want to fry it I had to stop overclocking my Phenom II 925 to 3.5GHz.

Right now I have it at 3ghz to be safe but how high do you think I could go before the tdp hits over 95 watts?

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August 12, 2011 3:32:19 PM

It's 95w at 2.8ghz.................so 2.9ghz would be over 95w......Is this a real question? Did you hit your head recently?
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August 12, 2011 8:06:29 PM

geekapproved said:
It's 95w at 2.8ghz.................so 2.9ghz would be over 95w......Is this a real question? Did you hit your head recently?


You have made my day with that comment.
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August 12, 2011 10:10:51 PM

geekapproved said:
It's 95w at 2.8ghz.................so 2.9ghz would be over 95w......Is this a real question? Did you hit your head recently?



Haven't you ever wondered why multiple speed variations of the same cpu have the same thermal tdp?

E8400 vs E8500 vs E8600 all have the 65watt tdp.

I swear I don't know why I ask from help from idiots.
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August 12, 2011 10:20:52 PM

I've never heard of a motherboard being fried from over-overclocking.
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August 12, 2011 10:25:14 PM

you wouldn't go over the stock 95w unless you raise voltages, as a general rule of thumb, if its stable on stock voltages then its safe.
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August 12, 2011 10:52:13 PM

azama said:
you wouldn't go over the stock 95w unless you raise voltages, as a general rule of thumb, if its stable on stock voltages then its safe.


My stock voltages are the same as the 955 and that cpu has a 125watt tdp, so overclocking has me worried.

For anyone interested in the dangers of going over the wattage your motherboard supports:

http://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=64145
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August 12, 2011 10:54:21 PM

protokiller said:
Haven't you ever wondered why multiple speed variations of the same cpu have the same thermal tdp?

E8400 vs E8500 vs E8600 all have the 65watt tdp.

I swear I don't know why I ask from help from idiots.


Were not talking about TDP, were talking about a wattage. Please go away and research the difference so us idiots don't embarrass you any further.
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August 12, 2011 11:00:37 PM

geekapproved said:
Were not talking about TDP, were talking about a wattage. Please go away and research the difference so us idiots don't embarrass you any further.


I'm talking about tdp and not wattage.

I care more about "the max power a device can dissipate when running real applications"

Rather than how much my cpu uses at half load or idle.
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August 12, 2011 11:02:35 PM

WHO'S DOING THE TALKING HERE
:D 
You'll be fine. You'll BSOD from a too-high OC before you have wattage problems.
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August 12, 2011 11:09:44 PM

Your not getting it. Your cpu consumes 95w at 2.8ghz. Period. At 3ghz, it's consuming more wattage than 95w, approx. 105w, regardless of whether you raised the voltage or not. However raising the voltage adds even more watts on top of that.
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August 12, 2011 11:16:36 PM

But you can go over TDP on a motherboard. It might not last as long, but the extra couple of watts won't break it.
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August 12, 2011 11:20:28 PM

geekapproved said:
Your not getting it. Your cpu consumes 95w at 2.8ghz. Period. At 3ghz, it's consuming more wattage than 95w, approx. 105w, regardless of whether you raised the voltage or not. However raising the voltage adds even more watts on top of that.


Lets pretend AMD had another Phenom II x4 that ran at the same voltage and had a 3ghz clock speed with a 95watt tdp.

How can you explain this? It happens all the time on the TDP which is supposed to be the max the processor can use but how can they really both have the same tdp if they have different clock speeds which according to you raises the wattage at least 5 watts.

If what you said was really true we would have all kinds of different tdp's. 95 watts, 100 watts, 105 watts, 110 watts, but we don't, we only have a few tiers.
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August 12, 2011 11:54:59 PM

Nah, GeekApproved is right, the Phenom II 955 and Phenom II 965 may have the same TDP, but even OC'ing to the 3.4Ghz of a Phenom II 965 would increase the TDP, may not be alot, but it is there.
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August 13, 2011 12:04:54 AM

Who can tell me why AMD and Intel have the same tdp for multiple processors if it's not really the same?

Or do they round it to the nearest TDP tier?
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August 13, 2011 12:12:36 AM

They use higher grade components in the more expensive processors, which is why the Phenom II 965 is a lot more expensive for a .2Ghz boost, if a Phenom II 955 uses to much power, it is binned as a Phenom II 955.

Processors are binned if they do not meet certain standards, (Phenom II 5XX, 7XX)and the process is the same for Intel, though they do not market defective processors like AMD.
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August 13, 2011 2:08:59 PM

protokiller said:
Lets pretend AMD had another Phenom II x4 that ran at the same voltage and had a 3ghz clock speed with a 95watt tdp.

How can you explain this? It happens all the time on the TDP which is supposed to be the max the processor can use but how can they really both have the same tdp if they have different clock speeds which according to you raises the wattage at least 5 watts.

If what you said was really true we would have all kinds of different tdp's. 95 watts, 100 watts, 105 watts, 110 watts, but we don't, we only have a few tiers.


Again, your confusing TDP with watts consumed. Totally different things. :sleep: 

Your 95w cpu can use 150w on stock volts, regardless of the TDP rating.
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August 13, 2011 8:16:39 PM

yummerzzz said:

Processors are binned if they do not meet certain standards, (Phenom II 5XX, 7XX)and the process is the same for Intel, though they do not market defective processors like AMD.

Actually they do. What do you think an E5200 or E7200 is if not a crippled E8200 Wolfdale?
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August 15, 2011 3:51:40 AM

geekapproved said:
Again, your confusing TDP with watts consumed. Totally different things. :sleep: 

Your 95w cpu can use 150w on stock volts, regardless of the TDP rating.



So in regard to the original question, I should be safe overclocking so long as I leave the voltage stock because the power consumption does not increase dramatically unless I do so?
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August 15, 2011 4:50:17 AM

Basically, yes. You should be safe.

TDP is not the same as power consumption. According to Intel tech documentation, TDP is the measure of thermal load of a CPU with every i/o pin toggling. Because that will probably never happen, power consumption is somewhat lower than TDP.

However, you always have some losses in the motherboard power regulator. This makes the TDP a reasonable estimate of CPU power consumption at stock freqs. Case in point: when I was overclocking my Q6600 (90 watt TDP) in a G'byte EP35-DS3P, based on actual measurements, the power regulator was pulling 8.0 amps (98.4 watts at 12.3 volts) from the CPU power plug at stock freqs. Running at 3.6 GHz required a core voltage increase from 1.2625 volts to 1.425 volts. Power regulator pulled 9.7 amps (119 watts) from the PSU.
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August 16, 2011 11:00:08 PM

@ JSC, when I meant market defective processors, I meant like locked cores, IE a Q6600 as an E5200.
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August 18, 2011 4:26:37 AM

Increasing the frequency will increase the power usage on a linear scale, while upping the voltage will increase the power usage exponentially.
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August 18, 2011 4:40:06 AM

Also, the TDP still has to hold true for the worst binned parts, the ones that barely make the cut and can't clock any higher (within reason). TDP is the power consumption (dissipation) in the worst case scenario with the worst binned part (usually one that can't reach any higher clocks at stock voltage). IMO you will be safe as long as you stay at stock voltage.
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