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Urgent: Water cooling on an airplane?

Last response: in Overclocking
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August 14, 2011 4:50:31 AM

Hello,

I'm heading to college tomorrow morning, and I'm taking my gaming rig, which uses a Corsair H50 (actually an Asetek LCLC, but same difference). I was planning on putting it in a heavily padded shipping carton (I kept the case's original box with fitted styrofoam cushions), and checking it through as a piece of luggage.

My concern is that the potentially lower pressure in the cargo hold will somehow damage the liquid cooling loop, potentially causing a leak. I'm inclined to think that it will be fine, but I just want to make sure. Thoughts?
a c 190 K Overclocking
August 14, 2011 12:52:33 PM

I'm guesssing here as I'm no physics genius, but as long as you allow the pc time to equalise the pressure after landing, couple of hours I reckon, you should be fine apart from some possible knocking noises to begin with,
your other option ofc is to remove the lcs unit and take as carryon, then refit it after you get to your new digs although explaining what it is to a customs officer might be fun :p 
just tell em its a 'marital aid' hehe
Moto
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August 14, 2011 1:20:07 PM

Haha, that might work :D 

I'm pretty sure it'll be fine; people take water bottles on planes all the time, and that's not an issue. The cargo hold should be pressurized... now I just have to hope they won't give me trouble about it being 4 pounds over the weight limit.
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August 14, 2011 3:35:06 PM

Im in no way a physicist but ive just finished A-Level physics and im not 100% sure but if the resevoir isnt pressurised then whatever the pressure is inside will attempt to equal the pressure outside... So basicaly if th cargo hold is at a lower pressure than the resevoir then the water will try to 'escape'. Now i dont use water cooling but im fairly sure that theyre designed not to leak meaning the water wont have anywhere to seap out off... you just need to be sure that all the joints will hold together under increased pressure from the inside.

Think of a balloon, as they get higher into the sky they expand... because he air inside needs to spread out to equal the pressure of the air outside :) 

Physics lesson over if you could empty the water and then refil it when you arrive you will have no issues, leaving the resevoir open so the air pressure doesnt effect it too if you want to be SUPER carefull :) 
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a b K Overclocking
August 14, 2011 4:20:54 PM

I won't leak, they don't ship all over the world via horse and buggy.
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a b K Overclocking
August 14, 2011 5:30:15 PM

+1^--->bipedal disaster hit it on the head.....Shipping companies tend to ship PC parts and PC's by air all the time.....So what was your question again? I would be more worried about some jackass breaking it while moving it around from the cargo holds
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a b K Overclocking
August 14, 2011 5:33:04 PM

adam1712 said:
Im in no way a physicist but ive just finished A-Level physics and im not 100% sure but if the resevoir isnt pressurised then whatever the pressure is inside will attempt to equal the pressure outside... So basicaly if th cargo hold is at a lower pressure than the resevoir then the water will try to 'escape'. Now i dont use water cooling but im fairly sure that theyre designed not to leak meaning the water wont have anywhere to seap out off... you just need to be sure that all the joints will hold together under increased pressure from the inside.

Think of a balloon, as they get higher into the sky they expand... because he air inside needs to spread out to equal the pressure of the air outside :) 

Physics lesson over if you could empty the water and then refil it when you arrive you will have no issues, leaving the resevoir open so the air pressure doesnt effect it too if you want to be SUPER carefull :) 



Wow you really over thought that........I guess I better make sure my dog has got a opening in him so he doesn't explode the next time we go on an airplane ride
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August 14, 2011 10:16:18 PM

lowjack989 said:
Wow you really over thought that........I guess I better make sure my dog has got a opening in him so he doesn't explode the next time we go on an airplane ride


Does your dog not have a mouth?
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a b K Overclocking
August 14, 2011 10:50:20 PM

It will be fine. Your cpu cooler has been in an airplane before.= Shipping..
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August 14, 2011 11:34:27 PM

If your computer has a reservoir just drain most of that and you should be good. I would pull it back to the point right above the pump's inlet. That way you would still have room for the pressure to go.
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a b K Overclocking
August 15, 2011 1:31:35 AM

adam1712 said:
Does your dog not have a mouth?



Indeed he does....lol
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a c 190 K Overclocking
August 15, 2011 6:10:58 AM

Just for the people who are advising draining the system/reservoir,
the h50 is a sealed unit, no draining possible,
Moto
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August 15, 2011 6:03:23 PM

Water does not expand significantly as you go up in the sky. It does however expand when heated by your CPU. So i think it is made to withstand the pressure difference when up in the sky.
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a c 327 K Overclocking
August 15, 2011 6:30:35 PM

Just partially drain you reservoir, should be fine. If you have a closed-loop system, how do you think they ship to stores? I'm betting that they are air shipped at some point in the process...

On most LCS coolers, they have more rigid tubing and would withstand higher/lower pressures and the fact that your water loop wouldn't respond to differences in air pressure...since its full of liquid, you would be fine, regardless. For there to be an issue with air pressure, you'd have to have an object with plenty of air inside (sealed) and subjected to different air pressures outside of the sealed container; and we all know the first rule of watercooling...remove all the air inside your loop.

There is a reason that fluids are used in brake lines, hydraulics, etc...liquids do not compress/expand under differences in pressure...whether air is present or not. They typically will only expand under instances of large heat or cooling changes where their actual phase change could occur (water to steam, for example).
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December 12, 2011 3:59:17 PM

Best answer selected by thepcphysician.
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a c 327 K Overclocking
December 12, 2011 4:02:07 PM

Closing this as it is 4 months since last activity.
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