Non-marring tool for opening/repairing laptop

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi,

In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
that tool on the internet but I can't find it. At some newsgroups I
saw that some people refer to this tool as a "wedge".

I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?

It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being made of
steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't hurt the plastic
parts of the laptop.

Thanks!
10 answers Last reply
More about marring tool opening repairing laptop
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic
    > scribe" to pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop.
    > I've searched for that tool on the internet but I can't find it.
    > At some newsgroups I saw that some people refer to this
    > tool as a "wedge".
    >
    > I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?
    >
    > It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being
    > made of steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't
    > hurt the plastic parts of the laptop.

    Depending on the piece you are removing, you might try the toothpick from a
    Swiss Army knife. It has a flat point that slides under plastic covers
    nicely, and it's a soft plastic that is unlikely to damage anything. It
    doesn't have much strength and won't pry up a cover that is more securely
    attached, but it works well for a lot of things.

    You may already have one of these, or any store that sells Swiss Army knives
    will have them as replacement parts.

    -Mike
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Them good old finger nails are probably just as good when you're trying to
    part those plastic panels held together by numerous snaps - such panels
    are most commonly found surrounding the LCD display - and yes, a toothpick
    would be helpful to keep the already parted snaps from snapping close.


    If you're using tools, please note that even plastic tools can cause
    scratch marks or dent/pry marks (plastic versus plastic is an even fight).
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    mACKnIFE wrote:
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
    > pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
    > that tool on the internet but I can't find it. At some newsgroups I
    > saw that some people refer to this tool as a "wedge".
    >
    > I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?
    >
    > It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being made of
    > steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't hurt the plastic
    > parts of the laptop.

    You might try a plastic putty knife.

    Larry
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
    > pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for

    A set of coil tuning tools will include one device like this - a
    plastic screwdriver. Usually one end is a hex driver and the other is
    a flathead screwdriver, for adjusting inductors.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    That's the best idea I've heard so far...
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Try using the clip on the cap of a basic cheapo Bic ballpoint pen - trim it
    to size if necessary.

    David

    "mACKnIFE" <machnife@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:733e6f06.0404281109.61022258@posting.google.com...
    > Hi,
    >
    > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
    > pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
    > that tool on the internet but I can't find it. At some newsgroups I
    > saw that some people refer to this tool as a "wedge".
    >
    > I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?
    >
    > It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being made of
    > steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't hurt the plastic
    > parts of the laptop.
    >
    > Thanks!
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Hehehe!

    This is funny! You guys are very resourceful! And I thought I was the
    only one in the boat with this one, not finding where to buy that damn
    plastic screwdriver! :-)

    Thanks guys!


    larwe@larwe.com (Lewin A.R.W. Edwards) wrote in message news:<608b6569.0404291023.43f3eda0@posting.google.com>...
    > > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
    > > pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
    >
    > A set of coil tuning tools will include one device like this - a
    > plastic screwdriver. Usually one end is a hex driver and the other is
    > a flathead screwdriver, for adjusting inductors.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    I encountered the same problem taking my Dell Inspiron XPS apart to
    replace a defective video card and found the perfect solution at
    www.specialized.net . If you look under "Hand Tools" and
    then under "Adjusting Tools", you'll find a five piece alignment
    toolkit (stock#054X700) for $6.50 and a GC Thorsen, alignment tool
    (stock#318X805) for $1.25. Shipping is about $10 so you might as
    well buy both as I did. So for a little under $18 you'll have a very
    handy set of tools for working on your laptop without scratching it
    up. They've got some other handy tools as well...I also found a
    keyboard key puller for $5.00. Enjoy! :D

    ==============
    Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
  9. Hi

    I have worked on laptops for many years now and now use a plastic card creaser tool ( used for folding the crease on greeting cards ) to prise open laptop cases. The best ones to buy cost about £5 and are often listed under "Genuine Bone Curved Card Creaser / Paper Creaser" on somewhere like ebay, or on some Greeting Card Material Suppliers sites.

    Another good method is to use any old credit card ( which I used for years to be honest )

    Hope this halps

    Nigel
  10. The tool in question is the same color as Dell's Lattitude model's plastic. It measures approx 5 inches long and it is 1.5 inches at one end and .5 inches at the other. I have photos as it was used by a contractor dispatched by Dell recently. It had no part number anywhere. I've had two separate chats with Dell support staff and they cannot find it in their inventory.
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