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Non-marring tool for opening/repairing laptop

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Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 28, 2004 4:09:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi,

In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
that tool on the internet but I can't find it. At some newsgroups I
saw that some people refer to this tool as a "wedge".

I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?

It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being made of
steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't hurt the plastic
parts of the laptop.

Thanks!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 28, 2004 4:31:28 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic
> scribe" to pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop.
> I've searched for that tool on the internet but I can't find it.
> At some newsgroups I saw that some people refer to this
> tool as a "wedge".
>
> I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?
>
> It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being
> made of steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't
> hurt the plastic parts of the laptop.

Depending on the piece you are removing, you might try the toothpick from a
Swiss Army knife. It has a flat point that slides under plastic covers
nicely, and it's a soft plastic that is unlikely to damage anything. It
doesn't have much strength and won't pry up a cover that is more securely
attached, but it works well for a lot of things.

You may already have one of these, or any store that sells Swiss Army knives
will have them as replacement parts.

-Mike
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 28, 2004 9:03:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Them good old finger nails are probably just as good when you're trying to
part those plastic panels held together by numerous snaps - such panels
are most commonly found surrounding the LCD display - and yes, a toothpick
would be helpful to keep the already parted snaps from snapping close.


If you're using tools, please note that even plastic tools can cause
scratch marks or dent/pry marks (plastic versus plastic is an even fight).
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 29, 2004 1:11:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

mACKnIFE wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
> pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
> that tool on the internet but I can't find it. At some newsgroups I
> saw that some people refer to this tool as a "wedge".
>
> I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?
>
> It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being made of
> steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't hurt the plastic
> parts of the laptop.

You might try a plastic putty knife.

Larry
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 29, 2004 3:23:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
> pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for

A set of coil tuning tools will include one device like this - a
plastic screwdriver. Usually one end is a hex driver and the other is
a flathead screwdriver, for adjusting inductors.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 29, 2004 4:04:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

That's the best idea I've heard so far...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 29, 2004 4:33:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Try using the clip on the cap of a basic cheapo Bic ballpoint pen - trim it
to size if necessary.

David

"mACKnIFE" <machnife@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:733e6f06.0404281109.61022258@posting.google.com...
> Hi,
>
> In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
> pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
> that tool on the internet but I can't find it. At some newsgroups I
> saw that some people refer to this tool as a "wedge".
>
> I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?
>
> It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being made of
> steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't hurt the plastic
> parts of the laptop.
>
> Thanks!
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 27, 2004 9:30:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hehehe!

This is funny! You guys are very resourceful! And I thought I was the
only one in the boat with this one, not finding where to buy that damn
plastic screwdriver! :-)

Thanks guys!


larwe@larwe.com (Lewin A.R.W. Edwards) wrote in message news:<608b6569.0404291023.43f3eda0@posting.google.com>...
> > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
> > pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
>
> A set of coil tuning tools will include one device like this - a
> plastic screwdriver. Usually one end is a hex driver and the other is
> a flathead screwdriver, for adjusting inductors.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
June 17, 2004 10:06:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I encountered the same problem taking my Dell Inspiron XPS apart to
replace a defective video card and found the perfect solution at
www.specialized.net . If you look under "Hand Tools" and
then under "Adjusting Tools", you'll find a five piece alignment
toolkit (stock#054X700) for $6.50 and a GC Thorsen, alignment tool
(stock#318X805) for $1.25. Shipping is about $10 so you might as
well buy both as I did. So for a little under $18 you'll have a very
handy set of tools for working on your laptop without scratching it
up. They've got some other handy tools as well...I also found a
keyboard key puller for $5.00. Enjoy! :D 

==============
Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
January 6, 2013 11:02:28 AM

Hi

I have worked on laptops for many years now and now use a plastic card creaser tool ( used for folding the crease on greeting cards ) to prise open laptop cases. The best ones to buy cost about £5 and are often listed under "Genuine Bone Curved Card Creaser / Paper Creaser" on somewhere like ebay, or on some Greeting Card Material Suppliers sites.

Another good method is to use any old credit card ( which I used for years to be honest )

Hope this halps

Nigel
!