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remove damaaged battery unit fr laptop

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 29, 2004 11:17:08 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

My Computer Info: Toshiba laptop, satellite 1905-277, Pentium 4 CPU 1.60 GHz
256 MB of RAM
OS: Windows XP Home Edition with SP1
Battery Pack
DC14.8V 5850 mAh, Model No. PA3166U-1BRS

My battery has damaged. It charges very rapidly and discharges rapidly
again. Now I can't use it. The point for me is only that now I have removed
it from main body and I don't know whether it is a correct thing to do or
not. Now that it doesn't function is it OK to keep it in main body? The
first option affects the weight of laptop I am carrying (battery unit is
heavy) but I fear the opening of its space might not good for the main body.
TIA Rasoul
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 29, 2004 4:02:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"I fear the opening of its space might not good for the main
body."

And you're right. First of all, it's not going to balance very well
(especially when you open and tilt the screen, it becomes top-heavy)
without the battery anchoring down the lower half. Secondly, you can get
away with it for a short period of time, but over time, your laptop's
plastic housing will lose its rigidity (increased flex) without the
battery in place. Think of the battery as a ... structural filler.

I would much prefer to keep the battery where it belongs.

bob
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 29, 2004 7:52:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Rasoul Khohravan Azar wrote:
>
> My Computer Info: Toshiba laptop, satellite 1905-277, Pentium 4 CPU 1.60 GHz
> 256 MB of RAM
> OS: Windows XP Home Edition with SP1
> Battery Pack
> DC14.8V 5850 mAh, Model No. PA3166U-1BRS
>
> My battery has damaged. It charges very rapidly and discharges rapidly
> again. Now I can't use it. The point for me is only that now I have removed
> it from main body and I don't know whether it is a correct thing to do or
> not. Now that it doesn't function is it OK to keep it in main body? The
> first option affects the weight of laptop I am carrying (battery unit is
> heavy) but I fear the opening of its space might not good for the main body.
> TIA Rasoul

Take the battery out. A bad battery will damage the DC board, plus being at
risk for a fire. Take it out, get a new one.

TJ
-------------------------------------------------------
The beatings will continue until morale improves.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 29, 2004 9:20:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

bobchang wrote:
>
> "I fear the opening of its space might not good for the main
> body."
>
> And you're right. First of all, it's not going to balance very well
> (especially when you open and tilt the screen, it becomes top-heavy)
> without the battery anchoring down the lower half. Secondly, you can get
> away with it for a short period of time, but over time, your laptop's
> plastic housing will lose its rigidity (increased flex) without the
> battery in place. Think of the battery as a ... structural filler.

no, no, and no. Bad idea. structural integrity? doesn't affect it. weight to
hold down the base? Dont bend the screen so far back. MUCH more ELECTRICAL
damage will occur if you leave the bad battery installed.

If you -- REALLY -- worry about the case flexing without the battery
'filler'(then you should have got a better laptop), split open the battery, cut
all the leads, pry out the insides, tape the shell back together and stick it
back in. If you want the weight, stick some lead/steel strips inside the
battery case before you tape it back up to hold it down. But isnt a desired
point of a laptop to be light?

> I would much prefer to keep the battery where it belongs.
>
> bob

then you'd much rather prefer to replace the DC card in a coupla months after it
burns out trying to continually charge a bad battery.

TJ
=========================================================================
The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2004 2:04:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"MUCH more ELECTRICAL damage will occur if you leave the bad battery
installed."

That is hogwash, okay. If a non-working battery (or even a dead shorted
one) will damage a laptop, then half of the laptops in the world would
suffer electrical damage as soon as their batteries' reach the end of
their charge cycles. I should know: I own about a dozen service
providers that deal with these laptops, and I've been dealing with these
animals hands-on since the very beginning (you remember those non-backlit
jobs and 30-lb machines, don't you?)

What you're claiming might have happened to early portables (luggables),
and even some notebooks that were made in the early 90s, but I haven't
seen a notebook that's made dumb enough to get itself bush-whacked by a
dead battery for ten years. If a dead battery can affect a laptop, then
it's because the laptop's dc-converter (power board) is already bad, and
not the other way around.

I would NOT - with emphasis on the word NOT - cut the battery casing apart
to do any type of a homestyle job on it, and especially NOT on a Toshiba
battery, not even if you're the finest craftsman in the world. Oh, and I
would definitely NOT take a battery full of lead strips thru an airport,
either.

regards,

bob chang
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2004 8:01:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

bobchang wrote:
>
> "MUCH more ELECTRICAL damage will occur if you leave the bad battery
> installed."
>
> That is hogwash, okay.

nope, not ok. Bad battery left in 'for ballast'(just a stupid idea) will damage
the DC board.

>If a non-working battery (or even a dead shorted
> one) will damage a laptop, then half of the laptops in the world would
> suffer electrical damage as soon as their batteries' reach the end of
> their charge cycles.

DC card will burn out/up continually trying to charge a dead battery, not just
my words. IBM's. It may not be immediate, or very shortly after, but it will
happen.

> I should know: I own about a dozen service
> providers that deal with these laptops, and I've been dealing with these
> animals hands-on since the very beginning

then you should be giving better advice.

>(you remember those non-backlit
> jobs and 30-lb machines, don't you?)

uh-huh

> What you're claiming might have happened to early portables (luggables),
> and even some notebooks that were made in the early 90s, but I haven't
> seen a notebook that's made dumb enough to get itself bush-whacked by a
> dead battery for ten years. If a dead battery can affect a laptop, then
> it's because the laptop's dc-converter (power board) is already bad, and
> not the other way around.

uh-huh

> I would NOT - with emphasis on the word NOT - cut the battery casing apart
> to do any type of a homestyle job on it, and especially NOT on a Toshiba
> battery, not even if you're the finest craftsman in the world. Oh, and I
> would definitely NOT take a battery full of lead strips thru an airport,
> either.

Hmmm, how many times do you go thru airports... careful, loaded question here,
you can't beat my answer.

> regards,
>
> bob chang

TJ, B757 I/P
-------------------------------------------------------
The beatings will continue until morale improves.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2004 8:01:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Bad battery left in 'for ballast'(just a stupid idea) will
damage the DC board."

Entirely hogwash again. I've seen laptops with bad DC-boards, and I've
seen laptops with dead batteries, but I rarely see both of 'em together.
Not on anything that's current, and not for the past seven, eight years.
As a matter of fact, the majority of computers nowadays don't even have
separate DC-boards, and on those machines, I've seen dead motherboards,
I've seen dead batteries, but I don't see both of 'em together. Not this
year, not last year, not the year before that, or the year before that, or
the year before that. I'm referring to cases where a customer has a
dead battery (or one that wouldn't hold a charge), and we wouldn't solve
the problem by replacing the battery - just the battery alone. I'm also
referring to cases where a customer has a bad dc-board, or a dead
motherboard - if it doesn't have a separate DC-board, and we ended up
having to replace the DC-board (or the motherboard) AND the battery. Not
one single case. The brands that we service include HP, CPQ, Fujitsu,
Dell, Toshiba, and IBM. I also have a couple of shops overseas that deal
with Acer and Mitac, and it ain't happening there, either.

Now you can create a situation where you have both a dead DC-board and a
dead battery: just put a dead machine (with a working battery) away for a
year, and the battery will be dead, too. But that ain't what we're
talking about, is it?

Talk about giving lousy advise. The mere thought of one cutting apart a
battery to empty its guts is enough to bring shrivers to my spine.

How can I be giving advise when all I was pointing to was to leave the
battery in its place? Duh!

You have a good day now, okay?

bob chang
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2004 8:51:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> Talk about giving lousy advise. The mere thought of one cutting apart a
> battery to empty its guts is enough to bring shrivers to my spine.

Why? I did this on my 600e and my i1300, because the battery in each
was totally useless - I wanted to have something in there to keep the
hole closed up (for cosmetic reasons, mainly), but I didn't want to
lug around the weight of a heavy battery.

So I effectively made my own weight saver. I broke the sonic welds
around the edge, pulled out the cells (which, I found out, were
actually leaking), and closed up the battery case again.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2004 2:48:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC wrote:

> bobchang wrote:
>
>>"MUCH more ELECTRICAL damage will occur if you leave the bad battery
>>installed."
>>
>>That is hogwash, okay.
>
>
> nope, not ok. Bad battery left in 'for ballast'(just a stupid idea) will damage
> the DC board.
>
>
>>If a non-working battery (or even a dead shorted
>>one) will damage a laptop, then half of the laptops in the world would
>>suffer electrical damage as soon as their batteries' reach the end of
>>their charge cycles.
>
>
> DC card will burn out/up continually trying to charge a dead battery, not just
> my words. IBM's. It may not be immediate, or very shortly after, but it will
> happen.
>
>
>>I should know: I own about a dozen service
>>providers that deal with these laptops, and I've been dealing with these
>>animals hands-on since the very beginning
>
>
> then you should be giving better advice.
>
>
>>(you remember those non-backlit
>>jobs and 30-lb machines, don't you?)
>
>
> uh-huh
>
>
>>What you're claiming might have happened to early portables (luggables),
>>and even some notebooks that were made in the early 90s, but I haven't
>>seen a notebook that's made dumb enough to get itself bush-whacked by a
>>dead battery for ten years. If a dead battery can affect a laptop, then
>>it's because the laptop's dc-converter (power board) is already bad, and
>>not the other way around.
>
>
> uh-huh
>
>
>>I would NOT - with emphasis on the word NOT - cut the battery casing apart
>>to do any type of a homestyle job on it, and especially NOT on a Toshiba
>>battery, not even if you're the finest craftsman in the world. Oh, and I
>>would definitely NOT take a battery full of lead strips thru an airport,
>>either.
>
>
> Hmmm, how many times do you go thru airports... careful, loaded question here,
> you can't beat my answer.
>
>
>>regards,
>>
>>bob chang
>
>
> TJ, B757 I/P
> -------------------------------------------------------
> The beatings will continue until morale improves.
I am very surprised that bob chang, who claims to such have such an
expertise, could give such advice. I recently had the experience of a
battery going bad without notice in my laptop, would not hold charge at
all (not one second). My laptop started acting (crashes when going to
stand-by especially, running warmer than usual, normally is fairly
cool). Since I use it on battery once in a while, I discovered the
battery was bad. As soon as I replaced the bad battery, my laptop
behavior returned to normal.

I guess that although the comparison is not exactly valid, keeping a bad
battery on a car will soon lead to the deterioration of the alternator
and may be other electronics. Why take chances ?

--
John Doue
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 30, 2004 9:17:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> Now why would anyone give such a piece of stupid advise as to taking the
> guts out of a battery, then stuffing it with weight (as Capt Wild Bill
> mentioned) in what has essentially become a portable desktop?

What the hell are you talking about? I took the bad cells out of my
battery and put NOTHING inside.

> While you might have been successful in breaking the sonic welds (Good for
> you!), I haven't even come close to seeing a halfway decent job on such

Then you work with totally incompetent people. Especially the i-series
batteries are very easy to open nondestructively and I doubt you could
tell the difference between my battery and another (well, except for
weight!) without reopening the housing.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 1, 2004 4:47:12 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

botching wrote, nothing of any importance:
> >
> Talk about giving lousy advise. The mere thought of one cutting apart a
> battery to empty its guts is enough to bring shrivers to my spine.

Shrivers? You have shrivers? Where do you get those? Do they come in family
size?

> How can I be giving advise when all I was pointing to was to leave the
> battery in its place? Duh!

duh.. leaving a BAD battery in its place while being plugged into AC power IS
bad advice, but then you supposedly repair laptops, so no, you're not giving bad
advice, you're just ensuring job security.

> You have a good day now, okay?
>
> bob chang

I always do
=========================================================================
The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 1, 2004 7:07:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

bobchang <totallyincorrect@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Now why would anyone give such a piece of stupid advise as to taking
> the guts out of a battery, then stuffing it with weight (as Capt Wild
> Bill mentioned) in what has essentially become a portable desktop?

Because leaving a battery with shorted cells in it installed in a laptop
will frequently kill the laptop's DC/DC card!

But, you already knew that, didn't you.

Regards,

James
!