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Overclocking NON K series core i5 2500

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August 23, 2011 8:32:40 PM

So i understand the max overclock on a non k version i5 can goto is 4.1 ghz. So I went into bios and changed the multiplier to make it 4.1 ghz, saved and exited, rebooted, went back into bios and it was back to the stock multiplier. Am i missing something?
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a b K Overclocking
August 23, 2011 9:08:26 PM

You can't overclock a non K chip with the multiplier. You would have to use the base clock (BCLK). On SB chips other systems are linked to the base clock so you really can't increase it by much, maybe 100 to 105 max.
August 23, 2011 10:02:53 PM

Thanks for the reply Bipedal, but doesnt that increase the RAM speed as well? And do you know what other systems are linked to it?
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a b K Overclocking
August 23, 2011 10:30:54 PM

A little, but we are only talking about a small BCLK increase. So small that it really isn't worth doing it.
August 24, 2011 5:51:09 PM

FYI I can and did raise the multiplier to a max of 41 for a clock speed of 4ghz, i didnt want to touch the BCLK
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a b K Overclocking
August 24, 2011 7:14:20 PM

If you have a 2500 SB chip and you're overclocking with an unlocked multiplier, then you have a K series chip.
August 24, 2011 7:32:49 PM

I believe you are wrong because the max the multiplier would allow me to go up to is 41. And the sticker on the cpu box it came in does not say it is a K version. Could they have mislabled it? And if thats the case why does the multiplier only go up to 41.
August 24, 2011 7:39:50 PM

It sounds like a BIOS issue since it didn't really maintain the multiplier at 41.
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a b K Overclocking
August 24, 2011 7:42:35 PM

Are you able to manually raise the multiplier? I'm not talking about what turbo does. The non K chips will just turbo up to a max of 3.7ghz. If you reached 4.0ghz without changing the blck speed, then you have a K chip.
August 24, 2011 7:45:11 PM

I am able to raise the CPU Multiplier, i have not touched the turbo boost frequency at all and Windows reports my clock speed at 4.0 Ghz

PS: CPUZ only reports the processor as a core i5 2500, it does NOT say 2500K
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a b K Overclocking
August 24, 2011 8:01:41 PM

Well unless I'm missing something, you have a 2500K. Overclocking is basically non existent with a non K SB chip. The stability issue with raising the blck clock on the current i5/i7's make it pointless for even a small overclock.
August 24, 2011 8:14:36 PM

Cygnus x-1 said:
Well unless I'm missing something, you have a 2500K. Overclocking is basically non existent with a non K SB chip. The stability issue with raising the blck clock on the current i5/i7's make it pointless for even a small overclock.


You should reread the article on the SB review that one of the previous posters linked.

The non-K chips allow for changing of the multiplier, but you are capped at certain values, in this case for the i5-2500, you are capped at 400mhz above the base multiplier. In non-K chips, the BCLK is now tied to the entire system. The main probably is the PCI-E subsystem, which does not operate outside of a narrow frequency band, and is why you should not touch the BCLK on the non-K SB chips. The difference between the K and non-K chips is that with the K chips, you are able to independently set the frequencies, so that when you adjust your BCLK you don't affect the PCI-E clock as well.

To answer the OP's question, you might have to turn off the Turbo Boost feature in order to keep your 4.1ghz OC.
August 24, 2011 8:26:39 PM



according to the link saood06 posted, the cpu multiplier for non K versions is normal to go up to 41 but on K versions it goes up to 57. Thus by my multiplier being limited to 41 i have a non K version unfortionatly. Its my own dumb fault for buying a non K series CPU and I kick myself for it every day. But neverless 4ghz isnt bad, I can live with that. You think a workaround will ever be released to unlock it to 57?
August 24, 2011 8:33:56 PM

mattimeo005 said:
You should reread the article on the SB review that one of the previous posters linked.

The non-K chips allow for changing of the multiplier, but you are capped at certain values, in this case for the i5-2500, you are capped at 400mhz above the base multiplier. In non-K chips, the BCLK is now tied to the entire system. The main probably is the PCI-E subsystem, which does not operate outside of a narrow frequency band, and is why you should not touch the BCLK on the non-K SB chips. The difference between the K and non-K chips is that with the K chips, you are able to independently set the frequencies, so that when you adjust your BCLK you don't affect the PCI-E clock as well.

To answer the OP's question, you might have to turn off the Turbo Boost feature in order to keep your 4.1ghz OC.


I thought it was all sandy bridge cpu's that has 1 clock generator for pci express etc. no?, and why do you think i have to turn turbo boost off? If i do so will it stop my cpu from downclocking during non-use?
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a b K Overclocking
August 24, 2011 9:38:42 PM

I understand that Matt... The way he was talking, I thought it was an actual overclock across 4 cores. not limited or max turbo on one core.
January 5, 2012 3:28:07 PM

It is like the chart says, 3.8 across 4 cores. I confirm this via IntelBurnTest and CPU-z. I also made the dumb move buying the 2500 on accident, but honestly 3.8 is way more than enough anyway. May as well accept the balance of performance, awesome temps, and lower power consumption that you still get with the 2500.
July 7, 2013 5:08:54 AM

i have also have that kind of chip.. and it can only reach up to 3.8 at 4 cores.. if you want higher speed then disable another core..
but for me 3.8ghz@ 4 cores is enough.. dont push too much to reach 4.1 at 4 cores..we all know that only k series chips can reach that speed without disabling a core or touching the base clock..
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