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Memory question...rebate ends at midnight!

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January 17, 2010 1:28:18 AM

Hey everyone, I need some quick advice please!

Do I need PC1333 or PC1600 RAM?

I'm building an AMD system that will be used for gaming, learning to overclock, and general use.

I'm putting in a 965 125W, MSI 790FX-GD70, CP-850 PSU, and a 5850.

There's a nice set of OCZ AMD Black Edition 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

and then there's.....

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Which do I get? What's really the difference between 1333 and 1600? I see a lot of (what appear to be) high end systems running 1333.

If I order the OCZ by midnight I can get the rebate.

HELP!

Thanks...

Mike
January 17, 2010 2:19:16 AM

Definitely go with the Ocz 1600 CAS8 RAM for only $85. The GSkill 1333 CAS7 is not as fast and it is $115. When judging memory, speed (1600 is better than 1333 MHz) is slightly more important than timings (CAS7 better than CAS8). This article summarizes the performance of various DDR3 RAM modules:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-870-1156,24...

Good luck with your order.

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a b } Memory
January 17, 2010 6:16:20 PM
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dpaul8 said:
Definitely go with the Ocz 1600 CAS8 RAM for only $85. The GSkill 1333 CAS7 is not as fast and it is $115. When judging memory, speed (1600 is better than 1333 MHz) is slightly more important than timings (CAS7 better than CAS8). This article summarizes the performance of various DDR3 RAM modules:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-870-1156,24...

I take a different message from the article. First, if I just look at the conclusion it states "go with brand-name memory at mainstream speeds, which still are in the DDR3-1333 space." As I read the recommendation list, it states a high priority is to "pick a branded product of at least DDR3-1333 speed and timings of CL8 or faster." And then as a lower priority "Go for a faster product if you find DDR3-1600 memory that provides the same timings as your preferred DDR3-1333 RAM kit at only a little price premium" (emphasis added) - and adds the caveat: "Don’t do it if you could get a faster processor for less or the same extra money." Don't spend more money on same timing 1600 RAM if the money could be spent on a more important component such as CPU, GPU, motherboard, I'd even say PSU.

That last caveat makes sense as I read the article because there is very littler performance difference between small increments in RAM.

Now, if it was my money and those were my only two choices in RAM, I would probably still agree with dpaul8. For $30, of my money, I don't know that a CAS 7 is that much better than a CAS 8. Be aware that depending on what kind of CPU you have, you may not be able to run the RAM at 1600 MHz. I don't know how easy AMD makes it to run the 965 at 1600 MHz. So you may ultimately be comparing 1333 CAS 8's to 1333 CAS 7's. There's a chance that if you had to run the 1600 RAM at 1333 you'd be able to tighten the timings to CAS 7. But I don't think it's something you can count on now.

EDIT: Since you're planning on building an AMD platform, you should give this article a read, it compares performance across a range of frequencies and timing on a Phenom II X4 955: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/phenom-ii-ddr3,2319...
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January 26, 2010 1:38:47 PM

Best answer selected by mirzai_m.
January 26, 2010 1:39:20 PM

ekoostik said:
I take a different message from the article. First, if I just look at the conclusion it states "go with brand-name memory at mainstream speeds, which still are in the DDR3-1333 space." As I read the recommendation list, it states a high priority is to "pick a branded product of at least DDR3-1333 speed and timings of CL8 or faster." And then as a lower priority "Go for a faster product if you find DDR3-1600 memory that provides the same timings as your preferred DDR3-1333 RAM kit at only a little price premium" (emphasis added) - and adds the caveat: "Don’t do it if you could get a faster processor for less or the same extra money." Don't spend more money on same timing 1600 RAM if the money could be spent on a more important component such as CPU, GPU, motherboard, I'd even say PSU.

That last caveat makes sense as I read the article because there is very littler performance difference between small increments in RAM.

Now, if it was my money and those were my only two choices in RAM, I would probably still agree with dpaul8. For $30, of my money, I don't know that a CAS 7 is that much better than a CAS 8. Be aware that depending on what kind of CPU you have, you may not be able to run the RAM at 1600 MHz. I don't know how easy AMD makes it to run the 965 at 1600 MHz. So you may ultimately be comparing 1333 CAS 8's to 1333 CAS 7's. There's a chance that if you had to run the 1600 RAM at 1333 you'd be able to tighten the timings to CAS 7. But I don't think it's something you can count on now.

EDIT: Since you're planning on building an AMD platform, you should give this article a read, it compares performance across a range of frequencies and timing on a Phenom II X4 955: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/phenom-ii-ddr3,2319...


Excellent, thanks for taking the time!
January 26, 2010 1:39:52 PM

dpaul8 said:
Definitely go with the Ocz 1600 CAS8 RAM for only $85. The GSkill 1333 CAS7 is not as fast and it is $115. When judging memory, speed (1600 is better than 1333 MHz) is slightly more important than timings (CAS7 better than CAS8). This article summarizes the performance of various DDR3 RAM modules:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-870-1156,24...

Good luck with your order.


Great advice, thanks for helping me out!
!