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Is this mobo okay for overclocking an i5 2500K???

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August 27, 2011 7:58:22 PM

I'm choosing parts for a new gaming system and it will be my first time overclocking. This mobo looked good...

GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3

But I noticed this comment in the reviews and it confused me...

Another downside (for some) will be overclocking capabilities. Most will not mind, but then again this board is not intended for massive overclocking due to its lack of voltage-regulation modules (VRMs).


Newegg's item description lists overclocking as something this mobo can do, but I'm not clear on what to look for in a mobo for overclocking.

Thanks for your help.
a c 216 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
August 28, 2011 12:47:21 AM

@THX1138, the poster of that customer review, is technically incompetent.

The GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 looks like it uses a 6 phase power VRM design.

A traditional Voltage Regulator Module (VRM) consists of a separate Choke, Capacitors, MOSFETs and a Driver IC.

Each VRM of each phase on the GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 uses a Driver MOSFET (i.e. MOSFET and driver IC in an SMD package) because it occupies less motherboard space. Just because someone doesn't see a traditional VRM circuit doesn't mean that it's not there.

When overclocking you want to keep your CPU Vcore as low as possible so that less heat is generated and less power is consumed.

The motherboards that have a higher number of VRM phases in their CPU power supply circuit design tend to allow for a higher and more stable overclock using less CPU Vcore than a design that utilises fewer VRM phases.

The GA-Z68X-UD7-B3, for example, has a 24 phase power VRM design so it should be a better overclocking motherboard. The price is also much higher.
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August 28, 2011 12:10:54 PM

ko888,

Thanks that is the first intelligible explanation I've gotten from any of my threads in various forums.
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August 28, 2011 5:19:30 PM

Here's another question -- let's say I up the multiplier and/or base clock of the CPU, but I don't take it any further than that. In other words I don't overclock to the point of upping voltages to get past the first signs of instability. Are the VRM components getting any hotter? If I understand correctly its just the upping of voltages that puts the VRM components through torture beyond what they are specced for, correct?
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a c 216 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
August 29, 2011 1:20:34 AM

imhotep531 said:
Here's another question -- let's say I up the multiplier and/or base clock of the CPU, but I don't take it any further than that. In other words I don't overclock to the point of upping voltages to get past the first signs of instability. Are the VRM components getting any hotter? If I understand correctly its just the upping of voltages that puts the VRM components through torture beyond what they are specced for, correct?

The UEFI/BIOS settings for voltages are usually defaulted to [Auto]. When you overclock the CPU the voltages are automatically increased to maintain stability. You should be able to manually set the voltages to the values that you want to use.
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