Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

GTX 570 HD

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
August 29, 2011 2:41:17 AM

Does anyone know of any waterblocks that fit a GTX 570 HD?

More about : gtx 570

August 29, 2011 12:50:56 PM

If you want to watercool your cards never buy anything but the refrence design ones.
a c 324 K Overclocking
August 29, 2011 4:12:30 PM

Why? Universal blocks work well...they don't cover vRAM, but that can be addressed with RAMsinks. Yes, full cover blocks look great and work great, but they are about 2x the cost of universals in most cases. It just depends if the 1-2C difference in temps and very minor flow difference is worth 2x the cost.
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
August 29, 2011 6:26:01 PM

IMO I would not Wipe my arse with a Universal waterblock, I have Personaly seen nothing but issues with them, Also if the case does not have great air flow inside of it the Voltage regs and memory on the gpu will easly overheat with a none full cover block, Feel free to read some reviews, most people that do watercooling dont have a big air cooling case, Example corsair 800d, great for watercooling horrible for air cooling.

To op,
If you have a very good air cooled case that has air going onto the gpu then use a universale block if you dont, and the fact the gtx 570s volt regs are known to cause issues due to heat stick with a better air cooler.

Also if you have a non ref edition gtx 570 which they all have better air cooling and you are still haveing bad temps this means that your case most likely has bad air flow and you might want to fix that first and see what is does.
August 29, 2011 6:28:19 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Why? Universal blocks work well...they don't cover vRAM, but that can be addressed with RAMsinks. Yes, full cover blocks look great and work great, but they are about 2x the cost of universals in most cases.
Quote:
It just depends if the 1-2C difference in temps and very minor flow difference is worth 2x the cost.




Yeah mabye 1-2 c on the gpu itself but the ram and voltage chips are going to suffer compared to a full cover block, Unless there is massive airflow.


Take into consideration its a 570 lol. voltage chips get to hot on these cards its a known issue, at least with the stock cooler there is air going into it to cool them down, With a crap universal block it doesnt.
a c 324 K Overclocking
August 29, 2011 6:42:35 PM

You can get voltage reg sinks for these, so this isn't a complete loss.

Quote:
I have Personaly seen nothing but issues with them,

What issues are there with universal blocks? I've been using universal GPU blocks for over 8 years...never had a single issue. If there are issues, I'm betting there are specific reasons for those issues...or good alternatives. Just because they don't cover the voltage regs, MOSFETs or RAM isn't a valid reason to say they suck...it's all about application and knowing what needs to be cooled.

RAM on a GPU doesn't get incredibly hot...I'd still recommend RAMsinks on them, regardless, but they aren't going to burn up because you 'only' have RAMsinks...all you need is moderately good case airflow to begin with...If your case has that poor of airflow to begin with, your GPU would burn up regardless of what cooler you ran. Stop and think about it for a minute....

Sorry, but without some specifics on why universal blocks are so bad, I can continue to shoot holes in your recommendations all day long.
August 29, 2011 7:06:45 PM

rubix_1011 said:
You can get voltage reg sinks for these, so this isn't a complete loss.

Quote:
I have Personaly seen nothing but issues with them,

What issues are there with universal blocks? I've been using universal GPU blocks for over 8 years...never had a single issue. If there are issues, I'm betting there are specific reasons for those issues...or good alternatives. Just because they don't cover the voltage regs, MOSFETs or RAM isn't a valid reason to say they suck...it's all about application and knowing what needs to be cooled.

RAM on a GPU doesn't get incredibly hot...I'd still recommend RAMsinks on them, regardless, but they aren't going to burn up because you 'only' have RAMsinks...all you need is moderately good case airflow to begin with...If your case has that poor of airflow to begin with, your GPU would burn up regardless of what cooler you ran. Stop and think about it for a minute....

Sorry, but without some specifics on why universal blocks are so bad, I can continue to shoot holes in your recommendations all day long.



Ok first of Mr. Self proclaimed expert, The gtx 570 has known issues with the temps on the volt regs, a universale block doesnt cover those, if the case does not have massive air flow even with after market stick on heatsinks it will over heat, Please do some research on 570, And mr. Expert i bet that i can find 10000 more reviews saying uni blocks suck. from places like bit tech and so fourth.
a c 324 K Overclocking
August 29, 2011 7:21:38 PM

What do you mean 'they suck'? Meaning, they perform 1-2C less than a full-cover block? Yes, I stated that...it also does not translate into 'they suck'. They also don't flow as fast as full-cover blocks (in general) again...does not equal 'universal GPU blocks suck'.

Yes, I am aware of the 570 (it also applies to other 5-series nVidia cards as well) but again...even if you have the stock cooler, you'd still suffer these issues.

Actually, yes...please post some reviews on 'universal blocks that suck'. I'd like to see the technical reasons why (outside of what I mentioned). I've agreed that they perform just below the curve as full cover blocks. However, you make them out to be the Antichrist of watercooling components...I'm sorry, I absolutely do not agree.

Furthermore- since when did I ever say once that I was an expert?
a b K Overclocking
August 29, 2011 8:20:26 PM

Just go for the solution that has the fewest overall issues and ease of installation. I do prefer full cover blocks but universal blocks sometimes do put out almost as well as a full cover when they are installed properly but on a Fermi era card you want to make sure the power vrm and the vram remains cool so that means you need/want a full cover block as single ramsinks are not enough to maintain such a card for the long run unless you do have a fan or fans near the card to help keep the power vrm cool. Every thing else is just basics.
August 29, 2011 9:34:29 PM

rubix_1011 said:
What do you mean 'they suck'? Meaning, they perform 1-2C less than a full-cover block? Yes, I stated that...it also does not translate into 'they suck'. They also don't flow as fast as full-cover blocks (in general) again...does not equal 'universal GPU blocks suck'.

Yes, I am aware of the 570 (it also applies to other 5-series nVidia cards as well) but again...even if you have the stock cooler, you'd still suffer these issues.

Actually, yes...please post some reviews on 'universal blocks that suck'. I'd like to see the technical reasons why (outside of what I mentioned). I've agreed that they perform just below the curve as full cover blocks. However, you make them out to be the Antichrist of watercooling components...I'm sorry, I absolutely do not agree.

Furthermore- since when did I ever say once that I was an expert?


Ok I'm sorry, Might as well drop this for the most part.
What i was trying to say simpley put was the 500 series cards need full waterblocks, There power chips and vram have major heat compared to other cards, So if you use qa universal block which will easily cool the gpu the same as a full cover it will not cool the other chips, and with that being said aftermarket stick on heat sinks will not do the job, so a full cover block or a very good air cooler is needed for 500 series cards.
a c 324 K Overclocking
August 29, 2011 9:42:30 PM

I agree with those statements...it's difficult to find heatsinks for the modules on some of these GPU components that would normally be cooled by the normal heatsink/cooler or a full-cover block.

You can also look into the Swiftech plates that cover the board's components and acts like a large heatsink, but they often to do not work for non-reference boards...which is what I believe the discussion started as.

As an example (this is for a 275, but I know there are others out there): http://www.frozencpu.com/products/9667/ex-blc-642/Swiftech_GTX275-P897_Full_Coverage_Heatsink_-_nVidia_GeForce_GTX275_P897_reference_design_-_GTX275-HS-P897.html?tl=g30c357s925

Link to the Swiftech site with more gear:http://www.swiftech.com/gpu_heatsinks.aspx
September 1, 2011 2:23:57 AM

I think that 570 has a refrence pcb.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
February 12, 2013 3:43:14 PM

[removed]

Disclaimer dealt with, it occurred to me that it would surely be possible to remove the main shroud of the GTX570 and the GPU heatsink, and fit a universal waterblock, leaving the main, reference, PCB heat sink, untouched (and potentially protecting your manufacturer's warranty) granted you'd have to modify the shroud to accommodate the coolant pipes, but you'd be potentially saving yourself a fair few quid, and you'd no longer have to fork out for a new set of blocks every time you upgrade graphics cards.

This is what I'm contemplating doing on a "borrowed" rig from work with twin GTX570s which are overheating. Of course I don't really want to fork out £200 for a pair of full waterblocks if I might have to return the rig (such as I would have to if I found a better job) so a £15 per card solution would fit the bill nicely.

If anyone indicates interest; I'll check in once I've done it :) 

For info this is what the reference GTX570 card looks like under the hood; http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/showthread.php?t=...

And here are the blocks I'm looking at; http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Thermaltake-CL-W0088-Aqua-Bra...
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
February 12, 2013 3:45:24 PM

Hmmmm, so I suppose this is an old dead thread :p 
Meh
a c 324 K Overclocking
February 12, 2013 4:51:47 PM

Not sure why this thread was resurrected from the dead, last post was about 1.5 years ago.

Closing- please open a new thread with current and relevant discussion topics.
!