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Qflash - Gigabyte

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  • Gigabyte
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Motherboards
January 19, 2010 12:19:39 AM

I am trying to flash my bios to version F6. It says I can't load it from a hard drive(don't have a floppy or usb), but when i open qflash all I see is the A drive and nothing else. How can I get my C: drive to appear or am I doing something wrong?

More about : qflash gigabyte

a c 178 V Motherboard
January 19, 2010 12:52:10 AM

Can't do it - BIOS doesn't have the resources to access a hard drive; floppy is far and away the best means, and they're what - seven dollars? There are a number of hardware oriented functions that are much easier from a floppy, including possible recovery of an almost completely corrupted BIOS...
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January 19, 2010 1:06:40 AM

Hmm..i swear when I was reading about qflash i saw something about flashing from the HD. Well I would think getting a flash drive would be a better idea than getting a floppy, no?
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a c 178 V Motherboard
January 19, 2010 1:23:17 AM

Well, in a word, no... Flash drives are finicky, need to be formatted correctly to work with the BIOS, need a BIOS parameter set that causes problems when you don't need the drive at boot, add another step (if not several) to every procedure a floppy is good for, and, simply and positively, cannot perform the 'blind flash' that can sometimes recover an otherwise 'bricked' board; in addition, GBs are notoriously 'finicky' about USB devices - and flash drives are the main offenders - I have had three types here, two of which were purchased specifically to let me write up a tutorial on USB pen-drive BIOS flashing and booting, and neither one of them would allow the system (an X48) to boot - and I don't mean boot from the drive, I mean boot at all - one of them causes the system to 'shed' its CMOS parameters (OCZ Diesel) at reset, the second (SanDisk Cruzer) causes the same, plus triggers the dreaded 'GB boot loop'...
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January 19, 2010 1:35:14 AM

Thanks alot for the heads up man. Guess I'll have to buy me a floppy drive. Didn't think I'd ever be using one of those again! I guess everything has its uses.
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January 19, 2010 1:38:06 AM

The only problem I see is that my antec 300 doesnt really have an external spot for a 3.5 inch drive.
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a c 178 V Motherboard
January 19, 2010 1:55:57 AM

I have a Cosmos 1000, and it doesn't either - I use a 3 1/2 to 5 mount kit, and have a little combination card reader/floppy - and every machine I build for anyone else has a floppy, too! Everyone who wants their machine to be easily configurable, and possibly recoverable after a major disaster should have:
A - a floppy...
B - the floppy set first in the boot order - it costs a second of boot time, and makes a little noise every boot, but it's the only hope of a 'blind flash', and, once your machine gets clobered, you can't enter the BIOS to change the boot order...
C - a bootable floppy with your current BIOS, the flasher, and an autoexec.bat that launches it (it's included in the zip file for nearly every GB BIOS download)...
D - another floppy that contains a copy of your CMOS parameters, especially if you're overclocking - getting 'em back after a disaster can be a real PITA...
(E) - in my case, I keep another floppy, with my multi-boot loader, and a copy of its extended master boot record

One of my major concerns about entering the foray into P55/X58 systems is how this function can be reliably replicated, as the new BIOS are two meg long - I can't edit them with my BIOS hacking tools, and I can't possibly put 'em on that emergency floppy!
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January 19, 2010 2:31:06 AM

I have an Antec Three Hundred case and Gigabyte motherboard. Just updated the BIOS using a SanDisk Cruzer flash drive and qFlash. No problem. Just format the flash drive in FAT 32 in Windows, unzip the BIOS onto the flash drive. If there is a problem with the drive; it will not be recognized by qFlash.
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January 19, 2010 2:35:20 AM

Hmmm interesting. Makes me think they are going to make flash drives the standard, but like you said...making the floppy default first boot drive is the key. But doing this with the USB drive would work as well as long as they fix the problems that you have stated with gigabyte boards. My board has a dualBIOS which I'm not completely sure what that means but I think it has something to do with recovering your BIOS if there is some type of failure. Am i right on this?
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January 19, 2010 2:38:46 AM

ronbo613 said:
I have an Antec Three Hundred case and Gigabyte motherboard. Just updated the BIOS using a SanDisk Cruzer flash drive and qFlash. No problem. Just format the flash drive in FAT 32 in Windows, unzip the BIOS onto the flash drive. If there is a problem with the drive; it will not be recognized by qFlash.



By doing this, you will not be able to use the flash drive for any other purpose though, correct(such as storing other data along with the BIOS)? If you want to save the BIOS on there for emergencies I mean.
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a c 178 V Motherboard
January 19, 2010 1:15:43 PM

Yup - the 'dual BIOS' is for exactly that - if your system attempts to boot,and finds a corrupt or otherwise 'unworkable' BIOS, the boot block (a small chunk of the BIOS' code that 'does' the initialization) will attempt to 'revert', copying the 'as shipped' BIOS rev from the second, backup chip, to the primary... I have found this mechanism to be absolutely reliable, which is why I believe that the problem with @BIOS, and its capability to 'trash' boards, pretty much has to be that it, unlike the other BIOS flashing methods, will allow an 'overwrite' of the boot block. If your floppy is first in the boot order, it will also, should the second BIOS be somehow defunct, attempt to boot from the floppy, which can allow it to do a flash from there to recover. I have never had to resort to this procedure (called a 'blind flash'), so my knowledge about it is limited, but I have walked a couple people through it here, with a better than 50% success ratio... I wish I could find more about the mechanism itself - can it work off a bootable CD, what's up with 'Japanese' (2.88) floppies, etc., but info from the BIOS suppliers is scarce to non-existent! Another thing is the 'wierdness' of the GB USB 'peculiarity'; I recently discovered that it is chipset dependant - I did a couple systems for folks last month, using the G31 and G41 chipsets, and found that, so far as I was able to see, they are 'immune' to the problem - I accidentally reset one with a flash drive in that I know will kill an X48 or P43, and it worked like a champ! The problem exists for different types of USB devices; mostly flash drives, but they come in 'spates': about six months ago, a number of people had trouble with external HDDs, all WD, and all either half or one terabyte drives; the time before, it was a particular brand of (USB, of course) external DVD - but I hadn't seen enough of the problem back then for the maker to register with me... I am currently unemployed, so my 'throw-away' computer budget is curtailed, but I have it in mind to eventually assemble a few USBs that won't work, and take them apart to see if perhaps it is some particular manufacturer's USB transceiver chip that is the culprit?
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January 19, 2010 9:21:36 PM

While I am prepared to leave floppy disc world behind; save for those Intel RAID drivers, the Dual BIOS seems like a good idea, I'm going to give it a closer look. Only thing I can say is that once I get a decent BIOS loaded (I'm thinking for this P55A-UD4P; the F6 should do it), I usually don't update it again unless there is a problem. I do think that flashing the BIOS over the internet seems a little risky; I wouldn't do it.

Quote:
By doing this, you will not be able to use the flash drive for any other purpose though, correct(such as storing other data along with the BIOS)? If you want to save the BIOS on there for emergencies I mean.

I used an old 2G SanDisk Cruzer to flash the BIOS. I copied the stuff off the flash drive and reformatted it just to be sure, then put the BIOS on it; flashed the computer and put the stuff back on the jump drive. You can always put the BIOS back on the removable drive; from another computer if necessary.
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a b V Motherboard
January 19, 2010 9:40:18 PM

adamh9 said:
By doing this, you will not be able to use the flash drive for any other purpose though, correct(such as storing other data along with the BIOS)? If you want to save the BIOS on there for emergencies I mean.


You can still use the USB thumbdrive to store other things as well as the BIOS the only difference is with the FAT32 file system you can not have a single file over 4gb in size but that isn't usually a problem on a thumb drive !! The FAT32 file system is just an older format that was used prior to NTFS so it works just like any other HDD format with a few restrictions and was mainly changed due to the format using specific size blocks and you not being able to store anything else in a single block so alot of space was wasted (ie. a 1kb. file would have to use an entire 16kb block on the disk - not sure on the block size anymore as it has been awhile but that gives you the idea !!)
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January 19, 2010 9:51:10 PM

I see.... now the gigabye website says I can flash my BIOS from a HD using FAT32. Now if I create a little partition on my HD and put my BIOS update in it, would this work?
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a b V Motherboard
January 19, 2010 9:54:28 PM

adamh9 said:
I see.... now the gigabye website says I can flash my BIOS from a HD using FAT32. Now if I create a little partition on my HD and put my BIOS update in it, would this work?


IT should - I know many of the Prebuilt makers will place their copy of the original OS and files onto a hidden FAT32 partition when they ship the systems so that it can be accessed in the event that the system needs to be recovered (so if it works for them with the OS I would think that should work for a BIOS flash program as well !!

Plus worse case you just delete the partition after trying !!
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January 20, 2010 12:15:28 AM

When the Gigabyte manual says "Hard Drive" in regards to the qFlash; they may mean an external USB hard drive. I can't speak about a partition on a drive that is connected to the system; for a system builder; that may be where the Dual BIOS comes in, but it has to be installed before the the operating system goes in for the first time.
The Windows 7 on my computer had no option to format the beater 2G SanDisk Cruzer in anything other than FAT; I chose FAT32.
I have a "restore" partition on my Sony VAIO laptop; it's not that easy to delete. I'd love to wipe the whole drive clean with all the bloatware and reinstall a basic Win 7 from the the factory restore disc; but I'm afraid to try it.
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a b V Motherboard
January 20, 2010 12:30:53 AM

ronbo613 said:

I have a "restore" partition on my Sony VAIO laptop; it's not that easy to delete. I'd love to wipe the whole drive clean with all the bloatware and reinstall a basic Win 7 from the the factory restore disc; but I'm afraid to try it.


Here's an Article - ( http://www.mydigitallife.info/2008/02/29/delete-and-rem... ) that details procedures to remove that partition if you want to recover the HDD space - I've found that about the only time you might need it is if the HDD fails and then it isn't very helpful seeing that it is on the same physical drive !!
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January 20, 2010 12:39:22 AM

good point. doesn't make to much sense now does it? Now let me ask you, If I was to make a bootable "recovery drive" out of a flash drive would I be able to store anything else on this drive or would it be best left alone?
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a b V Motherboard
January 20, 2010 12:49:04 AM

You could store anything else that you wanted as long as there was space on the drive - just be sure to format it with the system files so that it is bootable - though with the price of flash drives these days I would probably just put things like recovery tools and maybe an Anti-virus tool etc. on it and just store it away rather than use it for other things (just because the flash drives do tend to break if used too often.)
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January 21, 2010 4:10:12 PM

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I've found that about the only time you might need it is if the HDD fails and then it isn't very helpful seeing that it is on the same physical drive !!


You're right about that. The VAIO is a nice little computer; but the bloatware and factory "restore" options are lame. It is especially apparent when you are a computer builder and get to see how well a computer works when just the operating system and programs installed by the user are installed.
Back on the subject; buying a flash drive and keeping your BIOS and recovery tools on it is a good idea. They are cheap insurance. Just make sure the BIOS files are in the primary directory or they might not be recognized.
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