Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

My bios wont let me overclock my cpu and ram speed

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
September 5, 2011 2:28:17 AM

I have a HP- p7-1010t. So I want to OC my CPU or RAM. I've heard it's best to OC thru the BIOS, but my BIOS won't let me do so. Can anyone please explain how can I unlock this section in my BIOS? Any suggestions please. Thank you
a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
September 5, 2011 4:08:01 AM

HP, Dell, etc; design the BIOS so you can not OC the CPU or Ram. There is no way to unlock something that has been removed.

They do this because they want that PC to last for ever and not be damaged by some one who changed values that might cause a problem.

There really is no easy way to do this unless you happen to have another OP/SYS disc or are able to install the OP/SYS only from what HP gave you.

You would need to replace the M/BD and reinstall the OP/SYS only. The HP disc will look for the original M/BD and not seeing it may not install thinking that this is not an HP PC.

In the good ole days you could pull your BIOS chip from your M/BD and have it reflashed or replaced.

Just remember that if you do any of the above you no longer, technically, have an HP computer and if there is a warranty left it will be void.

Good luck to you. :sol: 
a b K Overclocking
a c 87 à CPUs
September 5, 2011 4:32:36 AM

There are BSEL mods for chips. Not as easy to do and you don't have as much control. Just search for one for your CPU.
Related resources
September 7, 2011 1:33:36 AM

It *IS* possible to reflash your BIOS. Some sites have "unlocked" BIOS settings which involves unlocking settings to become visible. Research CAREFULLY as it's super easy to brick your board. DO NOT under any circumstances reflash from a Windows Program. Always use a CD or USB program with DOS on it to flash as it's much more reliable.

*IF* your BIOS chip is soldered to the board, and you brick it, you're in trouble. If the chip sits in a "socket" allowing it to be removed by hand, you'd be in better shape as it can be reflashed by some people for a small fee or replaced easily. Trouble with HP is they have another chip somewhere that double checks if your bios chip is factory, if it's not, it'll brick the board as well (meaning the board is unusable).

After going through this trouble myself, I'd suggest replacing the motherboard with another aftermarket one like Biostar or Gigabyte, etc. Then transfer all existing hardware over. Windows will need to be reactivated to work with the new board. As long as you have the Windows sticker on your case with the Product ID, you're good to go. Call Microsoft, tell them "You've installed a new motherboard to your HP computer". *VERY* important you tell them you're only replacing motherboard or they won't allow Windows to be reactivated. EX: if you say you're building a "new" computer with the HP hard drive, they WON'T allow Windows to be reactivated. Complete BS actually, but it's true.
September 7, 2011 1:43:31 AM

Also, doing any of what I suggested is semi dangerous and obviously voids any existing warranties. I will never buy another HP product again due to the trouble it caused me and the fact that they "lock out" settings in the BIOS to keep warranty calls low. There are programs that can be run in windows that allow *some* overclocking to be done, but if you set something to high, you might have to restart in safe mode to deactivate it. Also, get some good temp monitoring devices as overclocking increases heat. Try OCing at your own risk.
a c 242 K Overclocking
a c 139 à CPUs
September 7, 2011 1:43:36 AM

nothing to do with mobo manucfacturer branded , it's locked !
keep at default it's the best for you ... if want verclock get mobo OCable from gigabyte, Asus, MSI etc.
September 8, 2011 1:13:34 AM

arthurh said:
HP, Dell, etc; design the BIOS so you can not OC the CPU or Ram. There is no way to unlock something that has been removed.

They do this because they want that PC to last for ever and not be damaged by some one who changed values that might cause a problem.

There really is no easy way to do this unless you happen to have another OP/SYS disc or are able to install the OP/SYS only from what HP gave you.

You would need to replace the M/BD and reinstall the OP/SYS only. The HP disc will look for the original M/BD and not seeing it may not install thinking that this is not an HP PC.

In the good ole days you could pull your BIOS chip from your M/BD and have it reflashed or replaced.

Just remember that if you do any of the above you no longer, technically, have an HP computer and if there is a warranty left it will be void.

Good luck to you. :sol: 



Thank you very much. It was very informative. Well I guess i'm ging to have to purchase a new MOBO. Thanx again
September 8, 2011 1:41:59 AM

They don't always remove stuff from the BIOS, but rather hide the options from the user. There are some sites that have guys who "un-hide" the settings HP or whoever has hidden. Say version 22.2 on an HP board is locked from OCing, you submit a copy of your bios 22.2 to the site, then if successful they'll "make the hidden options visible. Then you reflash with their "cracked" 22.2. Several sites do this. I don't recommend doing this with a newer board or your main set up. Always have a back up computer handy and back good flash on CD or USB..

If you ever decide to swap mobo, just erase the run.py file from HP/Bin if you get a "Code Purple" so you can continue using your HD and everything else you paid for.
September 8, 2011 1:48:25 AM

You can get an aftermarket board for 50.00 from popular online places and could just replace. I did the run.py delete trick and still have access to my HP back up/recovery partion as well. I bricked my 5 year old HP Pavillion I bought new. I had to call Microsoft and tell them I replaced my mobo and needed to reactivate Windows. So long as you have the Product ID sticker.
!