Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Why are people reluctant to give specific OC advice?

Last response: in Overclocking
Share

Why isn't there more advising on OC settings?

Total: 25 votes (4 blank votes)

  • Sense of "Noone taught me so you can learn for yourself."
  • 5 %
  • Lack of knowledge/ Lack of experts
  • 5 %
  • Too complicated and requires more than a 'canned' answer.
  • 77 %
  • OCing is competitive and noone wants to give up their secrets
  • 5 %
  • No one cares about OCing once they have their own settings done.
  • 10 %
a b K Overclocking
September 8, 2011 9:13:44 PM

I notice lately that there are a lot of people asking for OC advice and not many responses. So here is the question:
a c 190 K Overclocking
September 8, 2011 9:22:57 PM

You can take a batch of 100 'identical' chips, put them into identical mobos and each one will have different Oc limits, there are variables that can't usually be assumed from a threadpost on the net, you can give general advice but I cant tell you how to get XXX chip to 5Ghz because your own chip may only be able to hit 4.7, then you call me a liar or worse for giving you 'wrong' advice
:-)
Moto
a b K Overclocking
September 8, 2011 9:36:37 PM

I should have put that one in the poll :( 
Related resources
a c 190 K Overclocking
September 8, 2011 10:10:14 PM

You did, the more than a canned option, which I voted for :-p
Moto
a b K Overclocking
September 8, 2011 10:11:18 PM

Motopsychojdn said:
You did, the more than a canned option, which I voted for :-p
Moto


Same vote
September 9, 2011 12:05:07 AM

There are TONS of tutorials out there ALREADY on how to OC a specific chip.
People want to be spoon fed, Im not going to feed them.

a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 12:21:53 AM

I get annoyed when people ask questions that they could get from Google in a few seconds.
a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 12:48:12 AM

Don't just post; vote! hehe
a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 12:59:04 AM

I'd vote but there's no option for "other" or "people are stupid'.
a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 1:00:20 AM

ahhhh.. I needed an 'other'!!!!
September 9, 2011 1:25:35 AM

Another canned vote as well.
a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 1:42:50 AM

Lots of views, no so many votes.

For anyone new to OCing, you can give your general opinion as to why other people are reluctant to give advice as well.
a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 3:16:23 AM

vollman1 said:
I notice lately that there are a lot of people asking for OC advice and not many responses. So here is the question:


In addition to all of the legitimate answers above such as using a Google search, learning to help yourself by reading online tutorials, etc. there is no easy answer as it takes a LOT of technical knowledge, perserverance and methodical tinkering to OC a system and actually have a stable PC that one can use. Any fool can jack the CPU voltage, bump the frequency and have a PC that crashes three times per hour... ;) 

Most people are willing to help but if you want to OC then you need to invest the effort to LEARN and then you can help others. No one can tell you the exact settings because no two PC systems have identical components. They all meet the same specs but they are all slightly different and that's why some OC better than others.
a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 3:56:18 AM

Same reason we don't sell guns to felons and retards in the U.S.

YOU'LL SHOOT YOUR EYE OUT!

Edit: nvm we do sell guns to just about anyone don't we?
a b K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 11:34:44 AM

Does the fact that OCing is becoming easier than it has been in the past influence anyone's decision to give advice or not? Maybe this is where the 'people are stupid' perspective is coming from?
a c 224 K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 3:18:27 PM

My reluctance comes from the fact of the hours on hours on hours, of writing guides so you guys could help yourselves by learning what to do.

So from my point of view, I have gone above and beyond to try and help you help yourselves, and anyone that's taken the time to write these overclocking guides, and knows what it takes to put one together, probably feels exactly the same.

Whether it's here or across the internet those that invested the time in those guides were giving you the knowledge you need to help yourself, if you don't develop the desire to learn it yourself, you will never be an accomplished overclocker.

Overclocking is not a cookie cutting process, the guides get you in the ballpark, because no two hardware setups are the same, even if you buy 2 identical setups they will overclock differently.

You will find much more tolerance here at THGF than you will at the main dedicated overclocking websites, and you'll find tolerance here for those actually trying to help themselves, but got stumped on something.

The information is out there, and if you start thirsting for the desire to learn how to overclock, one day you may write your own guide. Ryan

Edit; Didn't Poll because, "None of the Above" wasn't listed.

a c 286 K Overclocking
September 9, 2011 3:45:48 PM

Take a look of this:

Overclocking Forum Advice

I'm a nOOb in overclocking but IMO we can't give you something that you can't find your self. I had seen many of those threads asking for "give me the numbers for overclock this xxx cpu" What? Hello at least is the decent side of the things and while we can help you to get the best of your CPU, GPU, RAM and full systems is the final user who must find the answer and get the overclock we only can guide you.

I know, a little off of topic but the conclusion is easy: If you want overclock, ask for help, follow the advice and build your best result.

That's IMO, as I say, I'm a nOOb :D 
September 9, 2011 3:56:46 PM

Motopsychojdn said:
You can take a batch of 100 'identical' chips, put them into identical mobos and each one will have different Oc limits, there are variables that can't usually be assumed from a threadpost on the net, you can give general advice but I cant tell you how to get XXX chip to 5Ghz because your own chip may only be able to hit 4.7, then you call me a liar or worse for giving you 'wrong' advice
:-)
Moto

+1
also, its much easier to jump to a forum instead of reading walls of text that tell you each cpu is different, and mileage my vary.
a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2011 1:45:50 PM

Take off the gloves and just get dirty, no guts no glory and no pain no gain that is the way things should be when it comes to overclocking. It is like learning to do any thing in life just have to do it your self and learn the hard way but people these days want to be spoon fed.
a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2011 2:35:22 PM

Its been done to death, there is so much readily available info on the web, there is absolutely no reason to start a new thread. If you cant figure out how to find all this information without asking a new question, you probably shouldn't be fooling around inside your PC in the first place.
On another note, overclocking has become more of a novelty I think. We used to overclock seriously because hardware was expensive, and actually...pretty slow! You could gain big improvements that jumped right out at you. Today's higher end hardware is fast enough to run the most demanding game or software pretty well right out of the box. The only "need" to overclock is for benchmark bragging rights. Sure, a lot of folks still have older slower hardware, but honestly, the advice trend is not how to make this old hardware faster, most people are going to simply tell you that its time for an upgrade. Why mess trying to squeeze more out of a turnip when you can have a whole new watermelon for little of nothing?
a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2011 2:37:36 PM

My vote goes to Too complicated and requires more than a 'canned' answer. From what I have noticed people want the easy way on everything. All chips are not created equal so every oc is not the same. Also try google it does wonders..
a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2011 3:09:11 PM

christop said:
My vote goes to Too complicated and requires more than a 'canned' answer. From what I have noticed people want the easy way on everything. All chips are not created equal so every oc is not the same. Also try google it does wonders..


I vote for this.

Except ... over-clocking has become really simple -- AND folks still want to take short-cuts without any interest in learning the simple basics of system component interaction. If folks have no interest in learning the basics, why would others care to take THEIR time in simply propping up the intentionally stoopid?

And on a sad note, enthusiasts used to take great pride in spending the least amount of money possible and modding the maximum amount of performance from those components. These days, folks throw money around simply for epeen and bragging rights for performance they don't need.

Want to have a $1,000.00 computer in three months? Buy a $2,000.00 computer today ...


[:fisshy:2]


a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2011 5:29:47 PM

4Ryan6 said:
Overclocking is not a cookie cutting process, the guides get you in the ballpark, because no two hardware setups are the same, even if you buy 2 identical setups they will overclock differently.

No (2) CPUs are the same either. I told the OP this in another part of the forum some time ago.

Trust me I hate telling someone VCCIO -> 1.125v~1.20v but there is not exact answer, ditto with almost any voltage. Answer use to lowest that works. Funny, OC is like a clown running around spinning dishes too fast or too slow -- you end-up with broken dishes.

4Ryan6 said:
Edit; Didn't Poll because, "None of the Above" wasn't listed.

^+1

Frankly you get into subjective pissing contests: Thermal Paste, Voltage, Fans, Controllers, Tube sizes, FPI, Compression vs Barb, Blocks, Pumps, Koolance vs EK vs Swiftech vs etc. So it also is in my MOBO/Memory section.

David Trubby once asked me why I don't do an YouTube channel - my answer is/was "no matter what you say, show or use someone's got a different and 'typically' hateful opinion."

Spoiler
Anyone who states an exact answer doesn't have a clue...
a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2011 6:46:18 PM

Unfortunately most folks who are new to OC'ing want instant gratification - typical of youth. They falsely believe from reading other people's experiences that you just change a few settings and everything magically OCs. Most of the time it simply doesn't work that way in the real world.

Some considerate people offer tech advice and some have created OC'ing tutorials. It's the newbie's responsibility to educate themselves on OC'ing. If that's unacceptable then they need to pay someone to instantly OC their rig for them - which will take a long time to accomplish if done properly. Time is money. How much do you want to overclock?
a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2011 7:01:54 PM

Glad to see some clear thought here
o/c rarely results in major change in ANYTHING.
Just ike te Q's about dual GTX 590's.
Can't you just enjoy the experience of a GTX 460 and an I5?
a b K Overclocking
September 10, 2011 9:26:28 PM

I think a broader option for the no canned answer vote may be that there is an artistic quality to OCing as well. Meaning that each artist has a unique way of accomplishing the same goal.

Is teaching someone how to OC like teaching someone how to paint then? Each teacher having a different 'style' or 'technique'? And having more than one 'teacher' can confuse things even though, if taken individually, all the advice is accurate?

Maybe this explains some of the feeling that ultimately it is up to the individual to find what their own style is?
a c 224 K Overclocking
September 12, 2011 1:15:45 PM

Basic facts are that some out here just learned how to overclock their own selves, as a moderator I see guys one week crying for help and 2 weeks later advising others on how to overclock their computers.

The blind leading the blind, because they don't even fully understand what they've accomplished, the glass isn't even half full more like 100th full, I'm not trying to offend anyone just stating the facts.

A little information can be a dangerous thing, what they should be doing is researching how to fine tune from there and continue the learning process., not just get there and stop.

Seasoned overclockers don't need a guide, they can write the guides their own selves and probably wouldn't even read one other than to critique it because they use a different method, that's why overclocking is not a cookie cutter procedure, there are various routes to the same goal.

Most don't help others because of the too many Chiefs and not enough Indians syndrome that occurs here all the time, overclocking is a walk through procedure step by step, to get to the ultimate goal, if a step is omitted, the cries for help begin.

The problem occurs when the little bit of knowledge overrides the help being given so those that really could help the individual leave the thread, simply because they're not going to waste their time on those not listening, or so confused from conflicting input.

Some situations are the user has so much to learn, there's just too much to take them by the hand and help them until they learn some simple basics, that's what the guides are for, so they can help themselves.

How do you think we learned?

No one took us by the hand we researched, studied, applied it, and learned by doing, looking back, it's easy to see how much variation there was and has been to overclocking.

Today is the easiest overclocking you'll ever do, with unlocked CPUs so available, the guides are there, but people still want it done for them, it's a sad state of affairs, actually.

But not for those reading this that understand exactly what I'm saying here.

a c 286 K Overclocking
September 12, 2011 1:40:12 PM

4Ryan6 said:
Basic facts are that some out here just learned how to overclock their own selves, as a moderator I see guys one week crying for help and 2 weeks later advising others on how to overclock their computers.

The blind leading the blind, because they don't even fully understand what they've accomplished, the glass isn't even half full more like 100th full, I'm not trying to offend anyone just stating the facts.

A little information can be a dangerous thing, what they should be doing is researching how to fine tune from there and continue the learning process., not just get there and stop.

True overclockers don't need a guide, they can write the guides their own selves and probably wouldn't even read one other than to critique it because they use a different method, that's why overclocking is not a cookie cutter procedure, there are various routes to the same goal.

Most don't help others because of the too many Chiefs and not enough Indians syndrome that occurs here all the time, overclocking is a walk through procedure step by step, to get to the ultimate goal, if a step is omitted, the cries for help begin.

The problem occurs when the little bit of knowledge overrides the help being given so those that really could help the individual leave the thread, simply because they're not going to waste their time on those not listening, or so confused from conflicting input.

Some situations are the user has so much to learn, there's just too much to take them by the hand and help them until they learn some simple basics, that's what the guides are for, so they can help themselves.

How do you think we learned?

No one took us by the hand we researched, studied, applied it, and learned by doing, looking back, it's easy to see how much variation there was and has been to overclocking.

Today is the easiest overclocking you'll ever do, with unlocked CPUs so available, the guides are there, but people still want it done for them, it's a sad state of affairs, actually.

But not for those reading this that understand exactly what I'm saying here.


Awesome words man, I just want to add something.

If you call your self "overclocker" for copy setting and cross your fingers hoping that those settings works, please, take another hobby since overclock isn't for you. You need do it on you own, learn on your own and in some point, kill something trying to get the max of it.
a b K Overclocking
September 12, 2011 2:18:13 PM

The Biggest Question is "What is a Stable OC?" 10 people have 10 different definitions.

Sure I read what others have published and I find 'most' of the posts out there to be 'Horrible Guides to OC.' Just because you can get a CPU-z screen capture and/or 'CPU-Z Validation' means zip! Ditto with simple Prime95 tests or lacking Futuremark, etc.

We all were noobs.

I recall when I first OC my CPU and RAM, and without Guides I would have been clueless where to start and otherwise had no idea what to do. As far as true 'skill' OC takes very little in comparison to actual building an 'extreme rig.' The helpful example that comes to mind in addition to basic settings was to decipher BSOD codes and without 'those' Guides I would have been totally blind what to 'change.'

My prior response was geared towards already knowing the OP, and my concern for the OP is getting 20 different opinions from 20 different people and threads.

I have a 980X and I don't find it any more complex to OC than a Sandy Bridge or AMD - they all have their quirks. Obviously I also add BCLK OC my unlocked CPU. What sets the Men and Boys is PASSING rigorous tests e.g. Prime95 Blend for 12~24+ hours.

The OP now essentially has a stable 4.4GHz~4.5GHz on a very cheap HSF running Prime95 Blend for 12+ hours. I'm 'trying' to encourage the OP to block and put everything on water.
a c 224 K Overclocking
September 12, 2011 3:53:34 PM

jaquith said:
The Biggest Question is "What is a Stable OC?" 10 people have 10 different definitions.

Sure I read what others have published and I find 'most' of the posts out there to be 'Horrible Guides to OC.' Just because you can get a CPU-z screen capture and/or 'CPU-Z Validation' means zip! Ditto with simple Prime95 tests or lacking Futuremark, etc.

We all were noobs.

I recall when I first OC my CPU and RAM, and without Guides I would have been clueless where to start and otherwise had no idea what to do. As far as true 'skill' OC takes very little in comparison to actual building an 'extreme rig.' The helpful example that comes to mind in addition to basic settings was to decipher BSOD codes and without 'those' Guides I would have been totally blind what to 'change.'

My prior response was geared towards already knowing the OP, and my concern for the OP is getting 20 different opinions from 20 different people and threads.

I have a 980X and I don't find it any more complex to OC than a Sandy Bridge or AMD - they all have their quirks. Obviously I also add BCLK OC my unlocked CPU. What sets the Men and Boys is PASSING rigorous tests e.g. Prime95 Blend for 12~24+ hours.

The OP now essentially has a stable 4.4GHz~4.5GHz on a very cheap HSF running Prime95 Blend for 12+ hours. I'm 'trying' to encourage the OP to block and put everything on water.


Guides are not infallible, even the guide writer wants the user to learn something on their own, if it were cookie cutter simple and all hardware was exactly the same we could just post BIOS setting numbers and everyone could preset those numbers in their BIOS and we would all be good to go.

Like sharing a cheat sheet, to beat out AMD and Intel from selling higher end CPUs, overclocking is a luxury granted by AMD and Intel, they could completely stop it if they so desired, and there wouldn't be a thing you could do about it.

Someone may reach stability at certain settings and another not, the end result of stability is up to the user to decide just how much stress testing run time is enough, I've seen long term so called stable P95 runs, crash in a game, because P95 doesn't include graphics testing.

Stress testing time also depends on just what you're actually overclocking, a 775 Q9550 to reach 4.0ghz takes quite a bit of juggling to get there and requires extensive stress testing because the FSB is outside of specifications, and multiple voltages have to be adjusted to keep it stable, whereas a 2500K takes no where near even close to the Q9550 effort, if only the multiplier and Vcore are raised.

So what it takes to accomplish the overclock, is also dependent on just how long stress testing actually needs to be run, just how far out of specifications have you gone to arrive at the overclock, long stress testing is required under those circumstances.

I've been overclocking now approaching 10yrs, and I did change where I wrote True overclocker to Seasoned overclocker, and in my earlier overclocking days I read guides myself, but what I meant was after a time of overclocking, you get to the point you don't need a guide.

I didn't read any guides to get my 2500K to 5.0ghz, and it was a new to the market challenge, my only concern was discovering how far I could push the voltage to get there and what cooling would allow it, I did write a guide though, from my own experiences.
a b K Overclocking
September 12, 2011 6:25:41 PM

One thing that jaquith helped me to notice is that it is really advisable for someone new to overclocking to go back over the guides and basic materials after you have actually been overclocking for a bit. After re-reading some of the various guides, I am finding little things that I either missed the first time or didn't quite understand fully.

I do think that there is a place for sharing experiences and techniques in the learning curve. Tweaking, for instance, isn't something that I believe you can learn from a guide but I think that it does require some form of guidance.
a b K Overclocking
September 12, 2011 7:09:54 PM

4Ryan6 said:
...

I was being rhetorical and I was not asking anything -- I was stating fact.

I strongly suspect that both AMD and Intel will have some form of OC'ing for quite sometime, the second one quits 'allowing it' is the millisecond their sales will drop like an anvil. Maybe the olde days of pencils will be needed -- yeah I've been around 'that long.' 10 years ago I was building Dual Processor HTPC's.

I'm not diminishing or remotely referring to 'your guide(s)' and kudos for your OC your K @ 5GHz, got lucky with a good CPU or maybe it's unstable as hell. Irrelevant. However, I GUARANTEE I have some idea of what vCore is damaging before entering the BIOS. I like being early but not necessarily the first -- worked so well with B2 -- I prefer someone else to poof their $1K~$2K CPU(s) and/or ditto GPU(s).
a c 224 K Overclocking
September 12, 2011 9:59:09 PM

vollman1 said:
One thing that jaquith helped me to notice is that it is really advisable for someone new to overclocking to go back over the guides and basic materials after you have actually been overclocking for a bit. After re-reading some of the various guides, I am finding little things that I either missed the first time or didn't quite understand fully.


Sounds like how I assemble something, put it together, then read the instructions to see if you did it right.

Sometimes that's the best way to learn something, unless you get to the end and have parts left over! :lol: 

I've never had any qualms about helping someone really trying to help themselves, it's the ones that just want you to do it for then I have no patience for.


a c 197 K Overclocking
September 14, 2011 7:53:19 AM

I did not vote either - no "Other".

jaquith said:

... yeah I've been around 'that long.' 10 years ago I was building ...

Only 10 years? :) 

My occasional Overclocking Forum sig line:
"Overclocking since 1978 - Z80 (TRS-80) from 1.77 MHz to 2.01 MHz "

We just didn't call it that back then.

One of the things that a seeming lack of responses illustrates is that overclocking has been, until recently, a very narrowly specialized field. I have several Intel Core2 systems. So I pretty much ignore threads about AMD systems unless it is a pretty general question. Most of my systems use Gigabyte motherboards, so I pretty much can only speak in generalities about the BIOS' of other makers. I seriously considered using an Asus motherboard in one of my systems to gain some familiarity with the Asus BIOS.

I am glad that AMD BE's and Intel K's are so common. They greatly simplifiy the OC process. And they reduce some of the older technical constraints.
a b K Overclocking
September 14, 2011 9:46:30 AM

OC never interested me until after 2000 and I had a daughter for my 2nd 'childhood.'

I had all the gadgets, if it could be programmed I wrote the software. I've had a 'PC' since they existed. I prefer ASUS, EVGA, and Gigabyte for 'PCs'.

Building PCs is a hobby.
a c 286 K Overclocking
September 14, 2011 5:42:57 PM

Here is an excellent example:

Quote:
wrong. my 955BE has been running really well since i got it and got it up to 4ghz on stock fans... decided to go back down to 3.8 for longevity and it doesn't go over 60 degrees.

this was my first oc (thanks tom's hardware!)
a b K Overclocking
September 14, 2011 9:32:49 PM

This has been an interesting thread with great on-topic comments. I wish they all were this way ... but I need some over-clocking help.

Seriously :lol: 

If any of you guys have a link or remember how to figure AMD manufacture day/week/silicon from the serial number post it up or shoot me a PM (if I can ever remember how to use it).

I got two X3 Rana chips on the cheap and need to justify sweetly abusing one of them - LOL
a c 286 K Overclocking
September 15, 2011 1:22:56 PM

Here is an example:

CACZC AC 0938BPMW

Week 38 2009
a b K Overclocking
September 15, 2011 2:36:35 PM

saint19 said:
Here is an example:

CACZC AC 0938BPMW

Week 38 2009


Thanks, Saint.

What I've run into is I've got 2 from week 15 of this year. The serial starts with 9R13944D- and I've got

-10057
-11353

I've seen a thread somewhere (maybe at XS?) where a dang good explanation was given on how to extrapolate the physical location on the wafer from these numbers -- the hypothesis being the CPUs cut from the center region of the wafer are generally of higher quality/purity. All this stuff is fairly subjective but they backed it up by benching different CPUs from different regions from a single wafer.

Or ... maybe I'm hallucinating :o  -LOL The temps are dropping 20 degrees over the next few days, I've cleaned out my AC filters for maximum cooling and gathered all my implements of destruction. I'll just eenie-meenie-miney-moe :lol: 

Sorry for the duhversion. This thread is now returned.


!