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Over clocking my cpu

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September 20, 2011 2:19:36 AM

i want to take my AMD phenom II x6 1100T to 4.0 instead of the stock 3.30 my specs are as follows

motherboard-GIGABYTE 890gpa-ud3h
ram-patriot G-series 1600 (2 2 gig sticks)
GFX-ATI hd 5770 XFX edition
CPU-phenom II x6 1100t

im new to over clocking (except for gfx cards that is)and i would like some recommended numbers and perhaps a step by step on how to reach my goal

thanks for any help provided in advance

More about : clocking cpu

a b À AMD
a c 139 à CPUs
a c 242 K Overclocking
September 20, 2011 2:26:33 AM

first .. what is your PSU .. ? second read guide :
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/258573-29-black-editi...

first step : change voltage to smallest + 0.05v, raise multiplier : this is done to get the maximum clock speed of the CPU with the lowest voltage
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 20, 2011 11:13:13 AM

i wouldn't touch the voltage until you hit a multiplier that wont stabalize (wont boot windows or shuts down running Prime95). Voltage is the single most destructive thing you can increase for your cpu chip. A high temp will shut it down, but too much voltage could instantly fry your cpu. The guide henydiah posted is a great guide, but i would also encourage reading many other forums, including the AMD Overclocking Club's thread. You will be able to see many different calibrations, as well as being able to talk with people who have OC'd their system successfully. Also remember to make sure people have experience with YOUR SPECIFIC CHIP! This does make a difference. Intel and AMD especially OC differently, but even inside of AMD there are differences in chipsets (e.g. Rana chips compared to Phenom II's).
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 21, 2011 7:46:39 PM

See the Phenom II OC'ing tutorial at the link below.

http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=596...

As far as PSUs are concerned be informed. Before you buy any PSU read accurate, objective PSU reviews at reputable sites such as www.jonnyguru.com or www.hardwaresecrets.com on the EXACT model PSU that you are interested in as some brands have good and poor quality PSUs.

You can also get an accurate rating of how much PSU power is required for your current or future system at the PSU calculator link below. Once you know the total PSU watts required then you need to confirm that the 12v rail has enough amps. to support your Vid card(s) and the rest of the PC system.

There are several websites that show the Vid card power consumption in watts. Divide the watts by 12 to determine the amps. required on the 12v rail(s). Add 15 amps for the rest of the PC on the 12v rail and you now know the Minimum total 12v rail amps required under full load. It's best to have at least 5-10 amps. reserve on the 12v rail available under full load so the PSU is not loaded to 100%.
It's also worth noting that people often misunderstand the 80% power rating. This is a rating of the PSU's energy efficiency not it's output. 80% plus PSUs use less grid power to produce the same PC power. If it's 80% Bronze, Silver or Gold the cost savings on electricity is pretty small between Bronze, Silver and Gold unless you are paying very high rates for electricity so any 80% rated quality PSU is fine even if not Gold. For those who leave their PC on 24/7 a quality 80% PSU is a good investment.


http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-560-ti-sli-re...

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_5...
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September 21, 2011 7:46:52 PM

casualbuilder said:
i wouldn't touch the voltage until you hit a multiplier that wont stabalize (wont boot windows or shuts down running Prime95). Voltage is the single most destructive thing you can increase for your cpu chip. A high temp will shut it down, but too much voltage could instantly fry your cpu. The guide henydiah posted is a great guide, but i would also encourage reading many other forums, including the AMD Overclocking Club's thread. You will be able to see many different calibrations, as well as being able to talk with people who have OC'd their system successfully. Also remember to make sure people have experience with YOUR SPECIFIC CHIP! This does make a difference. Intel and AMD especially OC differently, but even inside of AMD there are differences in chipsets (e.g. Rana chips compared to Phenom II's).

i was talking with a few people that i know that do this sort of thing and they are saying my motherboard will limit my clocking which is why i posted almost all my system specs just so everyone has a better idea and iv experienced more qualified and informative information from this site and i have been reading other forums and posted this exact question in other forums
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 21, 2011 7:51:10 PM

Gigabyte is a good mobo so I'd take it all with a grain of salt because OC'ing depends on the CPU, mobo and RAM all working together at higher than designed or rated speeds. Each PC is different and so will the results be. See my signature on OC'ing.

You need to read DOLK's Phenom II OC'ing tutorial for more details specific to your CPU/situation.
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September 21, 2011 7:55:15 PM

your quote is rather spot on iv been tinkering for a few days now with getting my ram to the stock speed (1600) instead of the speed that this motherboard had it default at (1066) and i got it stable with a lot of reading and searching while sitting in my CMOS since im new to this it took almost a whole day
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September 21, 2011 8:09:16 PM

Best answer selected by burningoat.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 21, 2011 8:16:30 PM

I think many enthusiasts grossly underestimate the effort required to produce a good, stable OC'ed PC as it requires both technical knowledge and perserverance. It's not a matter of turn a few the knobs or change the BIOS settings and it's done...
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 21, 2011 8:19:35 PM

ill toast to that! ^+1 took me 4 days of badgering with my BIOS and changing things around, not to mention hours on the forums before i got a stable 4.1GHz on my 955BE. Im that much more satisfied now though knowing i did it and i took the time to learn.

Koodos beenthere!
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