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1st watercooling advice

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September 23, 2011 3:28:33 PM

Hi there,

as the title says, I'm about to mount my first watercooling system. Though I have gathered some usefull informations all around the web and have now decided about most of the parts of the system, I still have some questions. That's why I came here.


About my system :

MB : Asrock Z68 Extreme4 Gen3
CPU : I7 2600K
MEM : 8Gb dual channel G Skill Sniper 1600

Case : corsair 800D


About the watercooling parts :

CPU : Heatkiller 3.0 or EK Extreme HF Full nickel
GPU : EK Block for modified evga GTX570 HD pcb

Rad : Black Ice SR1 360 (allready bought)
Fans : Noiseblocker Black Silent Pro PL2

Res : EK Multioption 250
Pump: Laing D5 or DDC 1+ EK top for both

Tubing & fittings : 13/19 Masterkleer and bitspower parts


I'm going to overclock the CPU, maybe GPU, I'll keep single GPUed, so no SLI. I also will not watercool my motherboard or ram or so since it seems useless to me. That being said, I don't know yet wich CPU block is better for my purpose (I really like the heatkiller design but isn't the EK better performing?) and even more important which pump do I have to chose to run the whole loop D5 or DDC 1+(knowing both are good, but I need the one best adapted for my loop). I considered adding another rad if needs be (Black Ice SR1 140). And the last thing, I want silence or at least the most silent possible system.

So I hope my explanations were accurate and my english not all to bad and I thank all of you for the answers and advices which are all welcome.

a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
September 23, 2011 4:00:28 PM

You are really close...if you are going to overclock, I'd suggest an additional radiator...i7 2600k's tend to get rather warm once you get past 4ghz. GPUs are naturally hot, so OCing them just adds heat watts. Adding that addtional 140 would work well for you.

Either D5 or DDC pump will work excellent for you, so it's a matter of preference. I run a D5 with a CPU, 2x GPU, 2x radiators and 2x custom made reservoirs...and it runs fine. A DDC has more head pressure for restrictive loops (which yours wouldn't be that restrictive) and the D5 has a higher flow rate. Again...both are excellent choices and both would work superb...it really is preference in this instance.

As for CPU block- the top 3-5 blocks are typically very, very close in performance...so if you like the design of the Heatkiller, go with it...you won't be disappointed at all.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 23, 2011 5:06:02 PM

I hadn't seen any results for the Heatkiller 1155/1156 blocks when I was looking. I kept ending up with comparisons of the Rasa, EK Supreme HF and Apogee XT Rev. 2.

Those three are all very close - I had a Rasa on the way when I found a used EK for a great price, and ended up selling the Rasa. The Rasa was $20-30 cheaper than the other two blocks for ~2-4C difference.

As for pumps, I've found that the DDC pumps are a bit easier to place for lower-profile pump/res options. The D5s are cylindrical, so all the mounts place the pump horizontally which takes up more space , like my Koolance: http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/product_info.php?...

Just curious, any reason why you wouldn't cool the GPU?
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September 23, 2011 6:09:05 PM

Thanks for that quick answering both of you.

About the CPU block, i just saw that Skinnee Labs is actually testing the Heatkiller 3.0 in their 2011 Roundup , so I'll wait the results :)  .

About the pump, I think i'll go on D5 with some top, since place isn't a problem with my case and the higher flowrate of that pump fits more to my loop.

And what concerns the GPU, I actually intend to watercool it (the 80mm fan is turning me crazy at high speed), its just about overclocking it that I'm not sure yet.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 23, 2011 8:16:21 PM

Whunys said:

About the CPU block, i just saw that Skinnee Labs is actually testing the Heatkiller 3.0 in their 2011 Roundup , so I'll wait the results :)  .

About the pump, I think i'll go on D5 with some top, since place isn't a problem with my case and the higher flowrate of that pump fits more to my loop.

And what concerns the GPU, I actually intend to watercool it (the 80mm fan is turning me crazy at high speed), its just about overclocking it that I'm not sure yet.


You may as well wait. No harm done, and you may find something else that piques your interest.

I reread your statement about the GPU and somehow got "watercooling" out of "overclocking" ;) 
a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
September 23, 2011 8:38:40 PM

I understand how that is...I always assume that everyone should be watercooling that already isn't.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 23, 2011 9:17:01 PM

Unfortunately water-cooling is a waste of time and money for most people but if you're determined, good luck to ya.
a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
September 23, 2011 9:26:25 PM

Fortunately for me, I've had plenty of money and time to pursue it as a hobby.

What's the point of trolling?
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 23, 2011 10:07:26 PM

rubix_1011 said:
Fortunately for me, I've had plenty of money and time to pursue it as a hobby.

What's the point of trolling?



No trolling at all. My comment was directed to the OP.

The point is that's about all H2O cooling is good for - entertainment or a hobby. It's simply impractical for those looking for an efficient PC cooling system. My goal is to help people learn to help themselves thru knowledge. It would be irresponsible to suggest H2O cooling is anything but entertainment. Of course the hardware damage that happens with the inevitable water leaks is a real PITA along with a money pit. Many people who get into H2O cooling find out AFTER they have expensive damage that H2O cooling is impractical. All one has to do is go to the Corsair forums and read the sob stories and they will get a reality check.

As the song says: "Money for nothing and your chips aren't free..." I think that's how it goes. :??: 
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 23, 2011 11:22:25 PM

I mean, if you put it together incorrectly, then yes, leaks are inevitable. If you dedicate your time and assemble the loop correctly (which doesn't even take that much time, maybe an extra hour or two), then you won't experience any issues whatsoever.

Also, water has a higher thermal heat capacity than air, so by definition watercooling is a more efficient cooling solution - that's been proven by science, not just some hobbyists.
a b à CPUs
September 24, 2011 12:04:27 AM

Beenthere, I don't think you have ;) 

There are many thousands of successful custom water cooled rigs around, all of which cool better than any air solution.
Do you need some competence and patience? Yes of course.
Is it just a hobby? NO, but it's only for enthusiasts. Water cooling is not my hobby, it's a part of a hobby that includes gaming, computers, and helping others.
If computers are NOT your hobby then you either need to pay someone else to build and maintain your water cooled rig or you need to go with air.

I have had a water cooled PC for close to 2 years now and never a leak. I am not an exception. I did my research before I ever went near it.

And for those that want exceptional CPU cooling without some of the learning curve and hassle there is the Corsair H100
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Or one of the Swiftech solutions
http://www.petrastechshop.com/swh2edwitr12.html

I'm linking those two water cooling solutions to prove the point. They are both BETTER than air cooling a CPU.

However the OP has clearly done research and arrived at a clear understanding of what is needed, so really your desire to "help people learn to help themselves thru knowledge," which I'm sure is genuine, is misplaced in this thread.

Rather than read complaints on Corsairs support forum, I suggest you go somewhere that people go to learn about real water cooling and learn how to be successful:
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?70...
September 24, 2011 1:05:18 AM

I'll be following this thread. I'm about to build my first WC rig in a corsair 800D as well. Keep us up to date :wahoo: 
September 24, 2011 7:12:52 AM

'Morning,

to begin, yes "beenthere" it may look like a waste of time and money for some people..... just like tuning a car, having an awesome homecinema that you only use twice a month, buying and painting expenssive metal figures (I used to be a GW hobbyist in my youth), etc.

That being said, since I built up my first PC I always kept in touch with its microcosmos (news, reviews, forums, all the enthusiasts threads) meaning now that since I'm interested in watercooling my PC I gathered the intelligence needed and will continue to do it since everyone can still learn something from another one, even one with great knowledge. So what I'm doing sounds like the logical way of evolution to me.

Now, concerning the watercooling itself, yeah, I know the risks, I also know how to avoid them. I bought a 2600K with the intention to o/c, so since air cooling has its limits I'm going to watercool that part. And as "Proximon" said, I did research about the subject and I'm confident in my skill achieving it.

So what I already concluded out of my research (for the noobs as I am), watercooling can take a lot of time in the beginning, alone the reading and understanding of the whole concept, reviews and forums dedicated to it took me some weeks. Deciding about the parts and designing the integration of them in the case also takes its amount of time (I'm still not done with it ;)  ). And of course you have to like screwing, cutting, etc and be imaginative, all what makes the DIY concept.

By the way, I just received my Black Ice rad, looks nice :)  . And of course i let you know about the evolution of the loop.

a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 24, 2011 7:38:15 AM

The point is there is no practical benefit to H2O cooling. If you enjoy it as a hobby or entertainment that's perfectly fine but many people are under the misconception that H2O cooling provides some tangible benefit for everyday use, which it doesn't. That was my point and still is. Unfortunately many people do not realize this until after they have spent hundreds of dollars on an H20 set-up that requires frequent maintenance. Then when the inevitable water leaks damage the hardware components they finally come to the reality that H2O cooling isn't practical for everyday PC users - it's just a hobby.

You'll note that I am not disparaging anyone, just offering some insight for those who have not done enough research to understand the pros and cons of H2O PC cooling. If it's right for you - great, enjoy.
a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
September 24, 2011 4:55:37 PM

'Frequent maintenance'....such as what? I've been running the same water in my loop for over 2 years (probably closer to 3) without a leak. So...stability, performance and no maintenance for 2 years...maybe I'm missing something here? I guess using compressed air to blow dust out of radiators from time to time is a bit much for some users and this is overwhelming maintenance.

And again...Corsair is not 'watercooling'...sorry...those forums are for those who choose to get a LCS boxed cooler so they can say they have watercooling...when they actually have a cheap knock-off to tell their friends who also don't know any different. There's also a reason why there are so many sob stories on the Corsair forums...ever think of that?
September 24, 2011 8:02:55 PM

Each one has his own point of view about things and I'm not offended in any way if you thought that. Anyway I agree with rubix_11, I haven't read about bad watercooling issues with home made loops though I have no clue about the corsair or antec H2O products but thats no real watercooling to me at all.


Now back to the original theme of the post, I used the afternoon to draw the diagram of my loop which will look like that :

Res ==> Pump (in the bottom) ==> 140 Blck Ice Rad ==> GPU ==> CPU ==> Blck Ice 360 Rad ==> Res

And when I have found how to link or upload my diagram, I'll be glad to do it for those interested. 'Till that happen, any suggestions to the loop I mentioned are welcome :) .
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
September 24, 2011 8:22:37 PM

Loop order doesn't really matter. I changed my order from hitting the rads before each component to getting the the rads last and temps didn't change aside from the fact that I added a GPU.
a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
September 26, 2011 1:33:20 PM

That might be a good series to include in the sticky as reference.
October 15, 2011 12:58:29 PM

Hello again here,

so some time passed and I finished my rif successfully, it runs now for one week without any leak so I'm assuming it's proof.

In the top of the case I set the Black Ice SR-1 360 with the 3 Noiseblocker Black silent pro fans.
The pump is screwed from the inside against the HDD rack in the bottom of the case, a D5 with EK top.
CPU block is HK 3.0 and GPU is EK block for GTX570 HD
For the tubing, I used Masterkleer UV blue.

All the fittings are compression fittings from bitspower shiny black and for passing through the separating plate I used bitspower quick disconnect fittings (so I can also easely drain the water from the rig when needed).

And now some picts for you showing the mounted rig (sorry but since I have no camera I used my webcam to make the pictures, so I ha to mount and launch the computer first... the quality should be correct, but again, sorry it's just a webcam ^^)


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Next steps will be perhaps adding a 140 rad (perhaps cause I'm running my 2600K at 4.2ghz and my gtx570 at 809 mhz and temps are still under 40°C idle and under 50°C in charge), some more 90° fittings (I really love them, they make the tubing very easier to manage) and a new cable management with sleeve cables (but thats not WC anymore).

And what I have to say now that all is done, so..... I'm really happy with my rig, I really enjoyed all the steps from drawing the diagram to mounting an testing all the stuff.
October 15, 2011 1:44:33 PM

Nice job man! Fantastic looking rig. Looking forward to seeing the new additions.
a b à CPUs
a c 324 K Overclocking
October 15, 2011 10:19:56 PM

Very nice, clean build...how are you liking it so far?
Quote:
And what I have to say now that all is done, so..... I'm really happy with my rig, I really enjoyed all the steps from drawing the diagram to mounting an testing all the stuff.


Guessing this is the answer to that?
a b à CPUs
October 15, 2011 11:06:26 PM

I'm certainly impressed. My build still does not look that clean.
October 16, 2011 7:16:16 AM

Thanks for complimenting, I just tried to do the best work I could.

But I'm still not completely happy with it, for exemple I'm looking how to fix the Qdc's on the separation panel so they can't be pushed/ pulled by the tubes anymore. A backplate for the GPU could also be a good thing, but I don't found one and am not skilled enough to make one myself... nor have I the right tools to even try ^^.
Quote:
Guessing this is the answer to that?

Right guess :)  .
!