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$2000 Programming/Gaming/Media System

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Anonymous
August 13, 2009 5:06:08 PM

The Vitals:

Mobo - Intel DX58SO
CPU - Core i7 920
RAM - OCZ 3G1600LV6GK
SSD (to boot off of) - OCZ Vertex 30 GB
HDD - 2 x Samsung HD103UJ Raid 1
VGA - EVGA GeForce 1 GB GTS 250
DVD Burner - LG Black GH22LP20
Case - Sunbeam Transformer ATX IC-TR-US-BA
PS - Sunbeam PSU-BKS580 580W

Peripherals:
Keyboard & Mouse - Logitech MK300
Webcam - Microsoft LifeCam Show
Monitor - Samsung 2343BWX 23"
Speakers - Logitech Z-2300

Water Cooling:
Pump/Reservoir/LED Bay Drive - Thermaltake Aquabay M5
CPU Block - Swiftech Apogee GTZ 1366
Radiator - Black Ice III

OS: Ubuntu 8.10


Hey guys,

I'm not a n00b with computers but I totally am when it comes to building one. This is what I have decided on so far as my "shopping list" for the computer I am trying to build this month. I need some help though before I shell out the cash to buy the parts.

Questions:
Am I missing anything?
Is there a way to improve the water cooling system without the price skyrocketing?
Would you recommend any alternative parts?
What hardware equipment am I going to need to assemble the whole thing?
How are compatibility issues in Ubuntu 8.10 with any of the parts listed?


Any and all answers are much appreciated.

Thanks
August 13, 2009 5:15:52 PM

EVGA GeForce 1 GB GTS 250

I would not go with that. I would get a GTX 275 or GTX 260. The GTS is just a new name for the 9800.

I do not know Sunbeam's cases or PSU's but I always suggest Antec's for the Cases (900 or 1200) and Corsair for power supplies.
August 13, 2009 5:19:20 PM

Hey, nice ideas there. Let me start off:

Generally good parts there. If you buy straight from Intel, example the motherboard, you will have great support, but you have to pay for the Intel name....a good deal. I do not have a LGA1366 system, so do your research, but you may want to look at a slightly cheaper alternative from an equally reliable brand such as MSI, ASUS, or Gigabyte. Here is one from MSI:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Nothing against Sunbeam Power Supplys, but with the amount of stuff you are putting in there, and the price, I would go towards a much more reliable brand such as Corsair, Seasonic, PC Power and Cooling, or Thermaltake. Your power supply costs about $25 USD. With the money you would save on a alternative motherboard, look into one of these names.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This is 650W PSU that is $100 and $80 with a rebate. 650W...SLI capability and legenday reliablility. Something you may want to look into. And it gives you the option to do further upgrades with expansion cards and others.

Good Luck.
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August 13, 2009 5:31:11 PM

I've found sunbeam cases to be pretty mediocre in the past, but perhaps they have stepped up on quality recently. I did a quick search on newegg, and it is by far the cheapest, popular full tower ATX case well under $100 and gets decent reviews.

The intel Mobo is kind of skimpy on features, but it is solid. Personally I'd look for a bit more from any of the other X58 boards out there, but otherwise the intel is fine. As for needing a webcam, have you considered any of the newer monitors that have built in webcams? I know Asus makes some that aren't overly expensive, Dell has a nice monitor that does, but it gets kind of pricey if you don't locate a good deal site or coupon code.

The only tools you really need are probably going to be a phillips screwdriver, and maybe some pliers for the water cooling, depends on how the watercooling kit works out.

Also, keep a close eye on SSD prices. You may find a better option or a better price depending on when you order.
August 13, 2009 5:32:16 PM

jtmoney528 said:
I personally went with the EVGA x58 SLI A-1 MOBO:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


yeah I really do not know know a ton about the i7 platform, just throwing out an example that you don't have to go with the Intel manufactured board. In fact, its recommended sometimes that you do not...for customization and use kind of thing. I was also saying that because there are some cheaper boards out there..so moeny can be saved and put in areas that need improvement, like the power supply.
Anonymous
August 13, 2009 5:37:24 PM

Hey guys,

Thanks for the input I really appreciate it. I'm thinking I can add about $200 since I'm under budget so far so don't worry about cost cutting. My big concern is if I upgrade to the GTX 200 line (260's and 270's seem to be within cost range), will I run into compatibility issues with Ubuntu?

I'm thinking now I should use a 64-bit Ubuntu 9.04. Anyone know of any issues with my CPU, Mobo, RAM, SSD or the GTX 200 VGA?
August 13, 2009 5:45:31 PM

I run a small headless fileserver with ubuntu so I don't know a whole lot on what's available in terms of graphics, but I do know somebody has put together some drivers that should run GeForce cards better than the generic Linux ones. If it will get the card up to the full potential, I can't really say. I've never tried to do anything graphically intensive on my Ubuntu installs, always stuck to Windows for gaming and the like.
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