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GTX 570 SLI overheating advice needed

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October 10, 2011 1:16:10 PM

Hi. I've experienced a significant overheating problem since I've set up a GTX 570 SLI configuration and would really appreciate some advice from some experienced/knowledgable types as to what my best options are from here.

In short, I'm getting critical overheating on gpu intensive games to the point that the PC either reboots or the screens goes black and the system hangs. I'm certain the problem is due to my motherboard (asus P6X58D-E here ) which has the only two usable PCIe 2.0 slots so close together that the first gtx 570 has no space to draw air in for cooling the card (it has a third slot, but stupidly it's unusable as critical board slots become blocked if I put the 570 in). If I swap the cards, the same thing happens so it's not either card, definitely just the lack of space/airflow affecting the card in the first slot. I've measured the temps as rising to over 102 degrees after about 5 to 10 mins of gameplay before the system crashes, and have read that these cards shouldn't run over 97 degrees max so that's absolutely what's going wrong as far as I'm concerned.

I have a Cooler Master Wave Master case ( here ) and really have no understanding of how good/suitable the cooling is and whether it can be improved enough to compensate for the poor motherboard sli slot design. I have run the same game benchmark with the side case off and a 7" desk fan blowing directly onto the two GPUs, with all fans on 100% and the temp of the first card rises to and fluctuates between 97 and 98 degrees (the second card is usually at least 10 to 20 degrees cooler as it has enough space to draw air in) What I'm curious about is if I cut into my case side and install one or two decent intake fans right over the GPUs, is that realistically going to be sufficient to cool things down, or would I be wasting my time. Would such a setup be better or worse than the test environment 'desktop fan'? In my head, I reason that it needs to be better than the test environment or it wouldn't be worthwhile as the 97/98 degrees seem too close to the max temperature for the card, so unless I can be certain of setting up some case fans that will drop the temps down to at least sub 95 degrees it won't work.

The thing is, I've just spent a lot of money and pretty much my entire budget on what would be the perfect setup for my needs. I have a new 1920x1080 120Hz monitor, Nvidia 3d kit, and the 570 sli was to ensure 3d gaming frame rates remained high on high settings, and it works perfectly until the GPU overheats. It's frustrating to have spent so much money and be so close to what I want, and I'd hate to be faced with replacing my mobo as it's less than 6 months old, and I can't afford the cost of a new one.

So from my limited research, this is what I think my options are, and how realistic they are. I'd appreciate any advice on whether there are additional options, or whether my assessments are off.

1. Replace the mobo to one where the PCIe 2.0 slot are further apart. Cost of this is realistically out of reach until maybe Xmas and so something I'd prefer to avoid.
2. Install extra case fans over the GPUs. I think I could afford this, and my father in law would be well capable of modding the case side. Don't know if it would work though, and would hate to have spent the extra and gone to the trouble to find it didn't work, so would need to be certain this would solve the problem before I'd go ahead.
3. Water cooling. Know nothing about this, but it always strikes me as expensive and trickier to install than I'd be comfortable with. I really don't see this one as an option unless someone can really prove my concerns are unfounded.
4. Sell the two 570s and buy a 590. I think I'd probably end up making a notable loss on the 570s and then have to shell out further on the 590. Also, while I'm not an expert, I think I've read that 570 SLI is better performing than a single 590, so again the thought of spending extra to 'downgrade' is not something I'd be comfortable with.
5. Sell a single 570 and accept that I'll have to run games at lower settings if I want to play them in 3d. Would be frustrating if I have to do this.

As this is my first post here, I apologise if this is in the wrong place or I've been unaware of any commonly accepted posting guidlines. If I can provide more info to help your recommendations, just let me know.

TIA

Phil
October 14, 2011 8:08:48 PM

ok get new gpu fans on the two cards and get a pci slot fan to push out hot air and get a better side pannel fan to cool the gpus.
November 16, 2011 11:40:15 PM

Hi,

I was experiencing the same thing with my two 460s overheating. I called the manufacture and they really didn't have a solution. So my problem was because card 1 (top card) and card 2 (bottom card) were so close together card 1 didn't have enough room to move the heat away fast enough. What I originally was using was card 1 which had less airflow to push my two monitors and card 2 was the extra SLi card with no monitors connected to it.So I switched which card would drive the monitors to card 2, by doing so the extra heat was now on the card that had the best airflow. This worked out good. Now when I'm gaming, card 1 still gets hotter then card 2 but not to the point of shutting down. Typically in a intensive game card 1 would not pass 80c and card 2 was around 65-70c. Before that switch the heat was more like card 1 was 100c (then crash) and card 2 was still around 65-70c. So just by switching which card is driving the monitors makes a huge difference in heat. Also I added an higher RPM side case fan but it only all helped when I switched which card would drive the monitors. It didn't make a difference with just an extra higher RPM case fan.

Hope that helps some.

DT


phil777776 said:
Hi. I've experienced a significant overheating problem since I've set up a GTX 570 SLI configuration and would really appreciate some advice from some experienced/knowledgable types as to what my best options are from here.

In short, I'm getting critical overheating on gpu intensive games to the point that the PC either reboots or the screens goes black and the system hangs. I'm certain the problem is due to my motherboard (asus P6X58D-E here ) which has the only two usable PCIe 2.0 slots so close together that the first gtx 570 has no space to draw air in for cooling the card (it has a third slot, but stupidly it's unusable as critical board slots become blocked if I put the 570 in). If I swap the cards, the same thing happens so it's not either card, definitely just the lack of space/airflow affecting the card in the first slot. I've measured the temps as rising to over 102 degrees after about 5 to 10 mins of gameplay before the system crashes, and have read that these cards shouldn't run over 97 degrees max so that's absolutely what's going wrong as far as I'm concerned.

I have a Cooler Master Wave Master case ( here ) and really have no understanding of how good/suitable the cooling is and whether it can be improved enough to compensate for the poor motherboard sli slot design. I have run the same game benchmark with the side case off and a 7" desk fan blowing directly onto the two GPUs, with all fans on 100% and the temp of the first card rises to and fluctuates between 97 and 98 degrees (the second card is usually at least 10 to 20 degrees cooler as it has enough space to draw air in) What I'm curious about is if I cut into my case side and install one or two decent intake fans right over the GPUs, is that realistically going to be sufficient to cool things down, or would I be wasting my time. Would such a setup be better or worse than the test environment 'desktop fan'? In my head, I reason that it needs to be better than the test environment or it wouldn't be worthwhile as the 97/98 degrees seem too close to the max temperature for the card, so unless I can be certain of setting up some case fans that will drop the temps down to at least sub 95 degrees it won't work.

The thing is, I've just spent a lot of money and pretty much my entire budget on what would be the perfect setup for my needs. I have a new 1920x1080 120Hz monitor, Nvidia 3d kit, and the 570 sli was to ensure 3d gaming frame rates remained high on high settings, and it works perfectly until the GPU overheats. It's frustrating to have spent so much money and be so close to what I want, and I'd hate to be faced with replacing my mobo as it's less than 6 months old, and I can't afford the cost of a new one.

So from my limited research, this is what I think my options are, and how realistic they are. I'd appreciate any advice on whether there are additional options, or whether my assessments are off.

1. Replace the mobo to one where the PCIe 2.0 slot are further apart. Cost of this is realistically out of reach until maybe Xmas and so something I'd prefer to avoid.
2. Install extra case fans over the GPUs. I think I could afford this, and my father in law would be well capable of modding the case side. Don't know if it would work though, and would hate to have spent the extra and gone to the trouble to find it didn't work, so would need to be certain this would solve the problem before I'd go ahead.
3. Water cooling. Know nothing about this, but it always strikes me as expensive and trickier to install than I'd be comfortable with. I really don't see this one as an option unless someone can really prove my concerns are unfounded.
4. Sell the two 570s and buy a 590. I think I'd probably end up making a notable loss on the 570s and then have to shell out further on the 590. Also, while I'm not an expert, I think I've read that 570 SLI is better performing than a single 590, so again the thought of spending extra to 'downgrade' is not something I'd be comfortable with.
5. Sell a single 570 and accept that I'll have to run games at lower settings if I want to play them in 3d. Would be frustrating if I have to do this.

As this is my first post here, I apologise if this is in the wrong place or I've been unaware of any commonly accepted posting guidlines. If I can provide more info to help your recommendations, just let me know.

TIA

Phil
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a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2011 12:53:52 PM

Phil,

Your solution may be to invest in a different case. That case doesn't look like it cools well and I think that, if you try swapping out the case for a well designed case it will solve your problem.

I run 2 GTX 470s in SLI and they run hotter than GTX 570s. When I bought my first GTX470 (refernece design) it idled at 45 C and so I modded it out with the Zalman VF3000 and idle temp came down to 35 C. With the second GTX 470 I bought an enhanced reference design (the Galaxy) and it produced idle temps about 40 C.

I have the Corsair 600T case, and was happy with the cooling until I SLI'd the GPU. Since then I bought the optional mesh side panel and have mounted a single 120 mm fan pointed at the GPUs. Temps came down about 5 C. I am going to put in 3 morre 120 mm fans and expect to have a well cooled SLI rig.

I wen with the ASRock P67 Extreme6 because it was just about the best when I bought it in April. Plus it has good spacing for SLI (3 slots between PCI 1 & 2). So there is spacing for the airflow to the unmodded GTX 470. It seems that spacing is an issue with your mobo.

The other thing about the rig is that the Corsair 600T has a well designed airflow. Airflow in comes through the front bottom (and now side panel), exhausting out the top and rear.

If your f-i-l mods out your case it may help, but not as much as a well designed case. A diferent mobo, with better PCI spacing will also help.
November 17, 2011 1:57:21 PM

Thanks for the recent replies, I had actually forgotten about this thread!

Got some advice on this a few weeks ago and they said the same, ie it was the case letting me down. I managed to squeeze enough money together to get a Xigmatek Midguard Case with a couple of extra fans (one intake side fan directly over the GPUs), and in addition I've used a non conductive wedge to push the GPUs a bit further apart to increase air flow. Long story short my temps under stress range from the mid to high 80s which I'm happy with. Further to this I use MSI Afterburner to manage fan speeds and increase them gradually when the temps rise, so generally I can now keep temps in the 70s or low 80s max which when compared to the temps I had is quite impressive.

So I expect the case was the most important issue for me and anybody experiencing similar overheating, that is definitely the area I would recommend looking into addressing. I can appreciate that my case choice may not have been the best, but it was the best option available to me at the time, and it's worked out well in the end.

Thanks again

Phil
a b K Overclocking
November 17, 2011 4:20:06 PM

Phil,

Next time you plan for a SLI rig watch for the PCIe spacing. With the size of GPU/cooler packages, they generally take up two slots, and you really need three slot spaces for adequate cooling.
November 24, 2011 9:32:18 PM

Just out of curiosity did you try also to put the card that drives the monitor(s) on the card with the best airflow? In most cases it would be PCIe Slot 2.

DT
a b K Overclocking
November 25, 2011 5:58:32 PM

DeadT said:
Just out of curiosity did you try also to put the card that drives the monitor(s) on the card with the best airflow? In most cases it would be PCIe Slot 2.

DT


The GPUs run cooler when the monitor is connected to the better cooled one (usually the bottom card in a tower) but if it is the second GPU it does not show anything on the monitor until after it gets by the BIOS prompts. So, when you need to access the UEFI/BIOS you have to switch where the monitor is plugged.
!