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CPU now hot after OC

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October 13, 2011 12:44:34 PM

Hello, I have had my new build for about 4 months. Using i5 2500k. Had stock speed for those 4 months until I wanted to try a factory preset overclock config on my asrock mobo. Set to 4ghz and ran burn test. Temps got to 98 celsius. Immediately stopped at reverted to stock speeds. Now my temps are too high when I do burn test on stock. What is going on?

More about : cpu hot

October 13, 2011 7:35:10 PM

ok. the more you overclock the hotter your rig will become!

Stop now 98C is pretty close to burning your cpu out then you lose your processor,

Get a better cpu cooler, Stay away from the stock cooler it is only good for stock speed! And bigger better air coolers are too heavy and could break your motherboard when bumped or not installing correctly.

So

Go for the corsair H80 or H100 they are top of the line ALC ( Advanced liquid cooling ) they are self running so you will not need a radiator on the outside of your case or get more cooling liquid!

The h80 and h100 rotate the liquid and its great for overclocking! trust me my friend its your only way to go.

go back to stock speed,Get one of these before overclocking again
Good luck
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a b K Overclocking
October 13, 2011 7:48:31 PM

Your chip is easy to overclock, spend the time and do it right. Manually adjust the multiplier and cpu voltage. You will cut down the heat output by a decent amount most likely. Just read a quick guide or two on how to test your chip for stability.
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October 13, 2011 7:51:39 PM

Thanks for the replies. 4ghz was the lowest preset overclock on my motherboard. I can adjust it myself, but the real question is that now since I reverted BACK to stock speeds, why are the tests much higher in intelburn test? You think I messed up the thermal paste now? Idle @ 33celsius, now its like 40celsius stock speed. I will def get an aftermarket zalman or something, but my question is why now that i revert back to stock speed, the temps are high. Personally i think it's the termal paste, it spread unevenly because of the 98 celsius or something. Any thoughts?
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a b K Overclocking
October 13, 2011 7:54:58 PM

I can't recommend the Corsair H2O coolers or similar as they are very inefficient and often leak destroying PC hardware as a result. I'd suggest going to the Corsair H2O forums and reading the sad tales of woe before buying an inexpensive H2O cooler as normal HSFs are as good or better at cooling and they don't leak.

The link below shows cooling test data for many of the performance HSFs and some H2O coolers for comparison. Frosty Tech shows test data for both AMD and Intel CPUs because HSF performance varies slightly based on the CPU heat spreader area which is different on the AMD vs. Intel CPUs.

http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm#INTELHEATSI...
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a b å Intel
a b K Overclocking
October 13, 2011 10:05:26 PM

The heatsink might not have been put on all the way and the vibration from the fan spinning up to full speed may have made it come off a little, those stock push pins can be tricky. Bubbles in the thermal paste could occur if not put on correctly which could also cause issues.

Off topic a bit: Nightwolf is just spamming nonsense all over the forum (trying to help with incorrect info) and is starting threads to get help for himself at the same time. I don't understand why. Nightwolf, air coolers come with this thing called a backplate, and those self contained wc kits are not nearly as good as a real wc loop and air coolers at the same price beat them in cooling and noise.
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October 14, 2011 1:46:29 AM

I hadn't thought about the fan coming loose, that is a good idea. I will check that out and see if anything became loose, maybe one side the pin became unpinned and now thats why it gets hot only when doing a burn test or under load. I will see that and then if all else fails apply new thermal paste. Thanks
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a b K Overclocking
October 14, 2011 3:51:47 PM

critical temps for these cpu's is about 130. thats were you can do some damage. 100 and throttling starts.
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a c 324 K Overclocking
October 14, 2011 6:28:55 PM

Quote:
I can't recommend the Corsair H2O coolers or similar as they are very inefficient and often leak destroying PC hardware as a result. I'd suggest going to the Corsair H2O forums and reading the sad tales of woe before buying an inexpensive H2O cooler as normal HSFs are as good or better at cooling and they don't leak.


This isn't really correct at all. There aren't too many LCS coolers that actually leak, and those that were prone to it aren't really sold any more. Most of the current Corsair models are fairly decent, but perform about as well as good/great air coolers. A real watercooling loop will outperform both air cooling and an LCS cooler. BTW...we don't consider LCS coolers actual watercooling, and only listing Corsair isn't providing much of an unbiased opinion...

OP- If you are considering watercooling, follow the link to the Tom's watercooling forum sticky in my signature below and post up a thread there (if that is something you are interested in)..otherwise...good luck.

Quote:
The link below shows cooling test data for many of the performance HSFs and some H2O coolers for comparison. Frosty Tech shows test data for both AMD and Intel CPUs because HSF performance varies slightly based on the CPU heat spreader area which is different on the AMD vs. Intel CPUs.

http://www.frostytech.com/top5heat [...] ELHEATSINK


Good heatsink comparison site.
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a b K Overclocking
October 14, 2011 7:56:06 PM

It's not just Corsair H20 units that are leakers, Antec and others also have them. I'm sure Corsair and Antec and others who use closed loop H2O coolers certainly consider their systems to be H2O systems and rightly so.

Unfortunately as I stated they are inefficient and often leak causing hardware damage. Even high end H2O systems are hard to justify other than for a "hobby" where you are willing to do the maintenance required of an open H2O system. A quality air-cooled HSF is far better for most people who want to set it and forget it. Corsair, Antec and similar closed loop H20 systems are simply not a good system or value IMO and that's no knock on these companies, it's just reality. If you're not using chilled water then they offer minimal advantage if any compared to a quality high end air-cooled heatsink - as the test data shows.

I've used and recommended Corsair RAM for years but their PSUs and other products, none of which they actually produce... have had a checked history for performance and reliability. It is what it is. People are free to purchase whatever makes them happy. I like to let consumers know the bad knews before they spend their hard earned money so they don't have regrets.
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October 14, 2011 11:18:27 PM

Not really considering water cooling at all. I should be able to get to 4ghz on stock intel HSF, without getting up to 98 celsius on intel burn test. So I mainly was wondering why it would go that high on an overclock when it's under 50 celsius on stock 3.3 + 3.7 ghz turbo boost mode. Thanks for the input. Heres my build btw:

i5-2500k
Asrock Pro3 Z68
640 WD HD Blue Edition
Antec Neo Eco 630 watt PSU
Galaxy GTX 465
ASUS DVD
Corsair 4gb ram 1333
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a b å Intel
a b K Overclocking
October 15, 2011 3:50:19 AM

If the temp issues only happens when you overclock then it could be from the auto oc putting your vcore too high and the stock cooler is only meant to handle stock speeds. If the issue is still occurring when putting back down to stock then there's something wrong with the cooler installation. You wouldn't believe how many people come on this forum that couldn't put that stock heatsink on correctly and freak out from 90+ temps.
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October 22, 2011 12:16:57 AM

Best answer selected by darklabeley55.
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a c 225 K Overclocking
October 23, 2011 1:37:24 AM

This topic has been closed by 4ryan6
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