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OC'ing Q6600 (OC newbie here...help!)

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October 15, 2011 12:47:57 AM

Hi All,

I am planning of OC'ing my Q6600 from stock of 2.40Ghz to 3.0Ghz and after browsing the net, I've read that this can be done with stock voltage and stock cooling. Is this really as easy as changing the FSB from 266 to 333?!

Also, after doing so, what would you advise me to check to make sure I am not stressing my processor? (would temp check suffice?)

Thanks!

Intel Q6600 2.40Gz
Team Xtreem DDR2 1066 4GB
EMAXX P45-PRO (i know this is a not-so-known brand; but i had a hard time finding a LGA775 mobo when my last one broke)
Sapphire 6870 1GB
Windows 7 64-bit
Inwin Maelstrom

More about : ing q6600 newbie

a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 15, 2011 1:15:40 AM

You also want to lock pci-e to 100. Then your going to want to manually set ram speed,timing,and voltage if possible. With the stock fan you will still want to manually set cpu voltage to get better optimized for heat output.

Give this a read, it will give some idea of what to do. http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/259899-29-core-overcl...

A simple Google search will yeild other maybe more informative guides, but that will get you started.
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October 15, 2011 1:22:52 AM

Thanks will give that a read.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 15, 2011 1:51:31 AM

There are lots of guides to overclocking these cpu's. It is frequently possible to get them to 3.5GHz, maybe beyond. Those chips produce a lot of heat so how far you can go with stock cooling is always questionable. I overclocked one to 3.5GHz but I used a good Xigmatek cooler.

The Q6600 has a multiplier of 9, at 3.0GHz your bus would be running at 333MHz. Depending on how your ram speed is set you would be running your ram at 666MHz or faster. Unless you have really good ram you will probably try to run it too fast unless you change its settings. It is best to set the ram to run at 1:1, or some BIOS settings call it 2:1, but set it to the lowest that you can.

And set the PCI bus to 100MHz.

When I'm overclocking I use CPU-Z, Coretemp, superPi, and Prime95 for testing.

I will run cpu-z to see that my BIOS settings are in effect, and I'll run SuperPi just to get a ballpark benchmark speed to assure myself that the processor is doing what I want it to do. SuperPi doesn't stress the processor very much so it is just an informal test. Then crank up coretemp and prime95 and let prime95 run for awhile. The temps will stabilize in just a few minutes, and if prime95 will run for 5 or 10 minutes then I shut down and up my bios settings another little bit and try again. When you get up to what you think is the limit for your setup, or even just the limit that you want to run at, crank up prime95 and let it run for hours, up to 12 hours if you can. If it runs for 12 hours without failure then you can rest assured that your machine will handle your normal use.

You can certainly get into overclocking a lot more than this and spend more time tweaking things, but if you aren't really pushing the limit then this isn't needed. For 3.0GHz I would dare say that you could set your FSB to 333, set your PCI to 100, set your ram to 1:1, and crank it up. Then when you crank up prime95 watch the temps carefully because they could go up too high in like 10 or 15 sec. at which time you should pull out the power cord quickly. Or you could be more conservative and start at 2.6GHz, then go to 2.7GHz, then 2.8GHz, etc.
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October 15, 2011 2:24:20 AM

Hi Cadder,

Thanks for the advise. . I'm really having second thoughts of rushing into this because I dont even understand a lot of these things and I dont want to end up with a fried system.
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a b à CPUs
a c 330 K Overclocking
October 15, 2011 3:50:56 AM

I have the Q6600 as well- you should be able to OC to 3.0 by simply jumping your FSB from 266 to 333 without any voltage increase. Depending on how good your motherboard and RAM are, this should be possible without too much of an issue. Past that, you will need to bump your voltages up on both your RAM and vcore. My MB is a 790i, so my RAM and FSB can clock independently, but not all motherboards offer this feature...which yours is a P45...so I believe that it isn't (I ran an ASUS P45 board for a while and it wasn't possible to run separate FSB and unlinked RAM on P45...but might be a BIOS/MB vendor function).
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a c 172 à CPUs
a c 197 K Overclocking
October 16, 2011 6:06:52 AM

rubix, most P45 boards (including Asus) will let you set the RAM clock independent of the FSB freq. Unlike the nVidia chipsets, the P45 BIOS' just do not have a setting called "Unlinked".

carlos, you can run at 3.0 GHz with the stock cooler with a G0 (last chip revision) stepping Q6600 usually at the stock voltage.

If you can, adjust your memory timing so that CPU-Z indicates that you are running at an FSB:RAM ratio of 1:1. This will give you the best stability.
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October 27, 2011 2:18:53 PM

Hi all

Sorry for the late reply. I just have been busy from work.

Thanks for your inputs....I have one last question before I start trying things, what are your thoughts on

http://www.emaxxtech.com/products.php?id=19

Should I go on trying to OC?

Sorry for being such a newbie about this.


Thanks!
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October 29, 2011 7:17:43 AM

Just wanted to throw in my recent experience overclocking a Q6600 G0:

After using this chip at 2.4GHz for 3 years, I decided to try my luck at overclocking. On the stock cooler I tried running the chip at 2.8GHz. Without even increasing the voltage, it was getting uncomfortably hot, decided to abort prime95 at 85c temperature.

After changing the cooler to a modest Hyper 212+, I tried again and got up to an ideal 400 x 9 for 3.6 GHz, its indefinitely stable on prime95 test, temperatures no higher than 60c, with just under 1.5v. Memory multipler is set at x2 which gives me that perfect 1:1 FSB ratio which jsc mentioned.

Running smoothly for a few months now, happy enough with the result to wait patiently for an Ivybridge upgrade.


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October 30, 2011 10:00:10 AM

Hi gmkos,

Thanks for your input. Getting mixed replies here, might play it safe and buy a cooler before doing anything...
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October 30, 2011 4:47:29 PM

Hi,

I just OCed my Q6600 (Stepping B, Revision G0) to 3Ghz by turning up the FSB to 333. It runs around 60°C at max stress in all cores. The performance of my rig (used for gaming --> e.g. BF3) has very noticably increased (also for the GPU score on 3Dbenchmark (Futuremark).
Therefore i wish to increase the FSB to 400 (in order to reach the 1:1 ratio and of course to get the 3.6Ghz) in hope to get even more outta both the GPU and CPU.
I will however not do this without a new cooling system. I have been thinking about the Corsair Hydro 60 or maybe 80. --> Experiences anyone?

Oh yeah: what exactly happens when the PCIExpress rate increases proportionally (i left my PCIExpress on auto instead of setting it to 100Hz). ? Does the chip temp increase or what?

Thx


Motherboard
CPU Type QuadCore Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600, 3000 MHz (9 x 333)
Motherboard Name Asus P5K (3 PCI, 2 PCI-E x1, 2 PCI-E x16, 4 DDR2 DIMM, Audio, Gigabit LAN, IEEE-1394)
Motherboard Chipset Intel Bearlake P35
System Memory 4096 MB (DDR2-800 DDR2 SDRAM)
DIMM1: Kingmax KLDE88F-B8KB5 2 GB DDR2-800 DDR2 SDRAM (5-5-5-18 @ 400 MHz) (4-4-4-12 @ 266 MHz) (3-3-3-9 @ 200 MHz)
DIMM3: Kingmax KLDE88F-B8KB5 2 GB DDR2-800 DDR2 SDRAM (5-5-5-18 @ 400 MHz) (4-4-4-12 @ 266 MHz) (3-3-3-9 @ 200 MHz)
BIOS Type AMI (11/26/07)
Communication Port Communications Port (COM1)

Display
Video Adapter ATI Radeon HD 5800 Series (1024 MB)
Video Adapter ATI Radeon HD 5800 Series (1024 MB)
Video Adapter ATI Radeon HD 5800 Series (1024 MB)
3D Accelerator ATI Radeon HD 5850 (Cypress)
Monitor Asus VH242H [24" LCD] (93LMTF036833)


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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 31, 2011 2:57:25 AM

stashorizor said:

Therefore i wish to increase the FSB to 400 (in order to reach the 1:1 ratio and of course to get the 3.6Ghz) in hope to get even more outta both the GPU and CPU.

I will however not do this without a new cooling system. I have been thinking about the Corsair Hydro 60 or maybe 80. --> Experiences anyone?

Oh yeah: what exactly happens when the PCIExpress rate increases proportionally (i left my PCIExpress on auto instead of setting it to 100Hz). ? Does the chip temp increase or what?


1. You set the BIOS to run your ram at 1:1. The reason there might be a limit when you set the ram to 1:1 and set the CPU to run at 3.6GHz is that 800MHz ram is pretty common and 3.6GHz is the fastest that you can go without running the ram faster than 800MHz. You can run your ram at 1:1 irregardless of what you set the FSB to.

2. I don't think water cooling is worth it for most people, but the Q6600 produces a lot of heat and could benefit from a good cooler.

3. I've always read to limit the PCI bus but never read an explanation of why or what happens if you don't. My guess is that PCI devices may not be stable if the bus is running significantly faster.
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December 3, 2011 7:44:44 AM

Guys I've been looking at my current system settings on cpu-z,

Memory DRAM Freq currently at 400Mhz (5-5-5-12)
cpu still at stock, where FSB 266 (x9 multiplier)
giving me a FSB:D RAM ratio of 2/3

I am quite confused now. When you say run your ram 1:1, do you mean that when I bump up my FSB to 300, do I also change my DRAM freq to 300?
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a c 89 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 3, 2011 7:48:25 PM

so long as the cpu dont go above 70c your fine. Just make sure your ram is running at or below its rated speed, or you will probably get bluescreens, crashing etc. I have a coolermaster hyper 101 and it runs this cpu under 65C under full load. If you got a hyper tx3 or 212+ you would be able to get to 3.4 ghz pretty easily with some extra voltage. I had to give my chip a bit more voltage to get 3ghz, but thats because my motherboard has a bit of vdroop.
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December 4, 2011 3:52:24 AM






Hi all,

I took some screenshots of my system and I'm hoping you can clarify some things for me.
Is it just me, or is my processor running on a relatively higher voltage than required since I'm currently running on stock speed (Please refer to Core Temp pic)?

Also, if I set my "CPU Ratio Control" to 333 (x9) to get 3.0Ghz how would I know where to set my DRAM frequency? Would 800Mhz do?

Lastly, how do I know what voltage to set for my PC....sooo many voltage controls....
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a c 172 à CPUs
a c 197 K Overclocking
December 4, 2011 7:43:10 AM

carlosmunoz08 said:
Guys I've been looking at my current system settings on cpu-z,

Memory DRAM Freq currently at 400Mhz (5-5-5-12)
cpu still at stock, where FSB 266 (x9 multiplier)
giving me a FSB:D RAM ratio of 2/3

I am quite confused now. When you say run your ram 1:1, do you mean that when I bump up my FSB to 300, do I also change my DRAM freq to 300?

our 2:3 ratio means the RAM is running much faster than the CPU FSB. Here's the problem with that:
As you increase the FSB freq, the memory clock will change in the same proportion. If you increase the FSB to 333 MHz, your memory is going to run (if it can) at (333/266)*800 or DDR2-1000 speeds. And it probably cannot.

At a stock 266 MHz FSB, the memory will be running in step with the CPU at DDR2-533

==========================================================================================================
Definition time (attention purists, I'm talking about DDR2 and I'm simplifying a little :) ):
Core2 CPU's use a frontside bus (FSB). The FSB is a thing with two main characteristics: speed which is usually defined in MHz and width which in the Core2's is 64 bits wide. We are concerned with the speed.

Using the Q6600 as an example, the FSB frequency is 266 MHz. The matching DDR2 memory clock for that frequency is 533 MHz (266 X 2). DDR2 memory transfers two chunks of data for each bus cycle, hence double the frequency. So, to run 1:1 at an FSB of 266 MHz, we need DDR2-533 RAM. What CPUZ does is a little confusing. It will tell you that the memory frequency is 266 MHz for a 1:1 ratio.

The FSB clock is 1066 MHz (266 X 4). The bus is "quad pumped". It transfers 4 chunks of data into and out of the CPU each cycle. So each FSB cycle generates 4 FSB clocks.

Now, if you increase the FSB frequency to 333 MHz, the corresponding memory clock is 667 MHz and the FSB clock is 1333 MHz.

I always run my memory at 1:1. That is the FSB freq to mem freq ratio of one to one. That means that the memclock is twice the FSB freq. It's a little confusing. Running memory slower costs performance. Running memory faster does not give you much if any real world performance increase and it can lead to higher instability.
===============================================================================================================

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December 4, 2011 7:59:25 AM

jsc said:
our 2:3 ratio means the RAM is running much faster than the CPU FSB. Here's the problem with that:
As you increase the FSB freq, the memory clock will change in the same proportion. If you increase the FSB to 333 MHz, your memory is going to run (if it can) at (333/266)*800 or DDR2-1000 speeds. And it probably cannot.

At a stock 266 MHz FSB, the memory will be running in step with the CPU at DDR2-533

==========================================================================================================
Definition time (attention purists, I'm talking about DDR2 and I'm simplifying a little :) ):
Core2 CPU's use a frontside bus (FSB). The FSB is a thing with two main characteristics: speed which is usually defined in MHz and width which in the Core2's is 64 bits wide. We are concerned with the speed.

Using the Q6600 as an example, the FSB frequency is 266 MHz. The matching DDR2 memory clock for that frequency is 533 MHz (266 X 2). DDR2 memory transfers two chunks of data for each bus cycle, hence double the frequency. So, to run 1:1 at an FSB of 266 MHz, we need DDR2-533 RAM. What CPUZ does is a little confusing. It will tell you that the memory frequency is 266 MHz for a 1:1 ratio.

The FSB clock is 1066 MHz (266 X 4). The bus is "quad pumped". It transfers 4 chunks of data into and out of the CPU each cycle. So each FSB cycle generates 4 FSB clocks.

Now, if you increase the FSB frequency to 333 MHz, the corresponding memory clock is 667 MHz and the FSB clock is 1333 MHz.

I always run my memory at 1:1. That is the FSB freq to mem freq ratio of one to one. That means that the memclock is twice the FSB freq. It's a little confusing. Running memory slower costs performance. Running memory faster does not give you much if any real world performance increase and it can lead to higher instability.
===============================================================================================================


Hi Jsc,

Thanks for your reply.

I just want to make sure I got what you said right. So if I am looking to bump up my fsb to 333Mhz and manually set my mem clock to 667Mhz, I should end up with a 1:1 ratio right?

Correct me if I am wrong, but Team Xtreem DDR2 1066 4GB (http://www.memoryc.com/computermemory/ddr2ram/4gbteamxt...) should be able to run at 667Mhz right?


Sorry for being such a newbie

Thanks!
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 5, 2011 2:45:43 AM

IIRC you change the "DRAM Frequency" setting from "AUTO" to its lowest setting, which might be something like 2.0.
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December 5, 2011 12:41:49 PM

cadder said:
IIRC you change the "DRAM Frequency" setting from "AUTO" to its lowest setting, which might be something like 2.0.


Cadder,

Hey bud, I already set my DRAM Frequency to 667Mhz which leaves my with a 4:5 FSB:D RAMFreq ratio (667Mhz is the lowest my settings can go). I will be bumping my FSB to 333 to boost my clockspeed and end up with 1:1 FSB to DRAM frequency. I just am researching on how to adjust the voltages manually before doing so.

Based on CPU-Z, my VID is at 1.3250V (BIOS setting is set to auto) but IMO this is actually high already.

Anyways, i uploaded a screenshot of my BIOS and there are just to many voltage options and i still have no clue where to set each one. Any chance you're familiar with this?

Thanks!
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 5, 2011 7:06:49 PM

"CPU Voltage Control" is for your CPU. You can leave this on automatic if you aren't overclocking to the limit. If you are trying to go to the limit with a Q6600 you may have to increase the voltage yourself, or let the motherboard do it. Sometimes that motherboard will increase it too much though. It depends on whether the limitations of the chip or the maximum heat are what restrict your overclocking. If you have to stop because it is getting too hot, then lowering the voltage a bit might let you go farther without getting too hot. If the chip itself is a limitation then increasing the voltage will help, but this increases the heat and also increases the stress on the chip. Your overclocking limit might be defined by reaching maximum temperature, maximum voltage, or the chip itself just might not run any faster.

"DIMM Voltage Control" is for the ram. You can play with this if you want to fine tune your ram, but you should not need to if you just set the ram to run at its slowest speed.

"NB Voltage Control" is for the Northbridge. You shouldn't have to worry about this.

All of the other voltage controls you can ignore for now.
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December 9, 2011 10:17:48 AM

Hi all,

I have successfully 'overclocked' my processor (I think). I am currently running Prime 95 stress test and below is a screenshot of CPU-Z and Core Temp 1.0.




Temps for Core 0 and 1playing between 69c to 71c at full load while Cores 2 and 3 at 65c to to 67c.

Question, is this normal for the cores to have 3 to 5c difference? Also, in your opinion, would that be acceptable since here in the Philippines, ambient temp should be around 30 to 40c (I have no means to measure this, so I google'd it ; http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Ambient_temperature_in_the_Ph...)

Hope to hear from you guys

Thanks!
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a c 89 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 12, 2011 11:30:39 PM

yes all my cores are different temps the same distribution as yours.
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December 13, 2011 3:22:29 AM

alright. noted. thanks man!
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