Thinking of going under water.....Build it for me please :)

Sup everyone, so I'm thinking about going underwater but I have zero clue about where to start. Figured I'd ask the community to just build me one :lol:

The case I have is the COOLER MASTER Storm Sniper SGC-6000-KXN1-GP.

System Specs:

CPU - AMD Phenom II X6 1055T (Possibly upgrading to Bulldozer)
Mobo - ASUS Crosshair V Formula
Memory - G.SKILL Sniper 16GB
GPU - AMD Radeon HD 6990
PSU - CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX850 V2 850W
CASE - COOLER MASTER Storm Sniper SGC-6000-KXN1-GP
CPU Cooling - ZALMAN CNPS9900MAX-B

As for budget I really don't have one but lets not make this some super 1000$ project lol
6 answers Last reply
More about thinking water build
  1. If you think you're going to spend less than $1000 watercooling, you've got another thing coming your way. You can't just buy a case that supports watercooling. Each piece of hardware you're trying to overclock will need a waterblock to replace whatever kind of heatsink is already on it. Taking the cooler of a 6990 will not only void the warranty, but it will be a huge pain and will greatly increase the probability of having to get another one.

    Overclocking? Just buy decent parts now, then overclock in two or three years when Modern Warfare 6 comes out.
  2. Does this $1000 budget include the components above and the water loop? Or just the water loop alone?
    Quote:
    If you think you're going to spend less than $1000 watercooling, you've got another thing coming your way.

    Are you serious? You can EASILY build a CPU+GPU loop for under $500-$600...or even less depending on how frugal you want to be. Please don't offer such incorrect information to people that also don't know for themselves.

    Quote:
    Each piece of hardware you're trying to overclock will need a waterblock to replace whatever kind of heatsink is already on it.

    Not everyone that watercools does it to overclock. It isn't an automatic 1:1 ratio.

    Quote:
    Taking the cooler of a 6990 will not only void the warranty, but it will be a huge pain and will greatly increase the probability of having to get another one.

    Depends. A lot of manufacturers offer video cards with pre-installed water blocks or allow you to RMA a card due to failure/problems including watercooling issues. I replaced an EVGA card where I made the mistake of not fully seating some tubing and getting a fitting tight. They replaced it knowing full well it was due to water...I even told them. You just need to be cognizant of which brands offer warranties like this. Also- removing a stock air cooler and installing a waterblock is VERY simple. If you aren't sure...just search on YouTube...there are 1000's of videos that can help. Almost every install is the same...the details lie with each card's screw pattern and stock cooler layout. Other than that...pretty much all the same. (Again, please stop offering VERY incorrect information).

    Please read up in the WC sticky listed below in my signature, and please make sure you read and research as much as you can...this will help you greatly.
  3. Here are a few sites for water cooling parts;

    http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php
    http://www.koolance.com/default.php
    http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/
    http://www.frozencpu.com/

    With water cooling there is maintanence and it is some work involved setting it up and figureing it out the first time. So I would start out small and see if you like it and can do it , maybe just do the cpu for now. this is a good way to start with this unit from Koolance , it a combo resivoir , radiator , fans and pump in one unit.

    http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/product_info.php?product_id=1171

    With this you need to get some tubing , fittings , a cpu water block and coolant.

    http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/product_info.php?product_id=2030
    http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/default.php?cPath=62_86
    http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/default.php?cPath=94_96
    http://www.koolance.com/water-cooling/default.php?cPath=58

    When getting the tubing and fittings make sure they match , 1/2" ID tubing and 1/2" ID fittings , or 3/8" ID tubing and 3/8" ID fittings. Starting out with just the cpu you would probably get 3/8"ID parts. Of course you will need to do some research on this before you start and you may choose other parts instead of what I recomended.
  4. want to thank everyone's post, great info
  5. DrAwesome109 said:
    If you think you're going to spend less than $1000 watercooling, you've got another thing coming your way. You can't just buy a case that supports watercooling. Each piece of hardware you're trying to overclock will need a waterblock to replace whatever kind of heatsink is already on it. Taking the cooler of a 6990 will not only void the warranty, but it will be a huge pain and will greatly increase the probability of having to get another one.

    Overclocking? Just buy decent parts now, then overclock in two or three years when Modern Warfare 6 comes out.


    YES. I LOVE it when people who don't know what they're talking about just come over and start posting wrong information. *facepalm*

    I built my loop (CPU + 2xGPUs, 2 rads) for about $600. $1000, and we'd be talking LN2 or phase-change.

    I've seen hybrid loops (albeit, doesn't make too much sense) where the CPU was aircooled and the GPUs were watercooled, and all components were OCed. Some CPUs don't benefit from watercooling, because they'll hit 4.7+ GHz on air with a $100 cooler, and 4.8 on water in a $600 loop. There are hybrid loops out there specifically because of this.

    I assume you don't read your warranties at all based on your comments. Though EVGA doesn't make a 6990, I know for a fact that their warranty will cover their cards with aftermarket coolers:

    From http://www.evga.com/support/warranty/
    The product must be returned to EVGA in the original factory configuration and condition. All aftermarket modification must be reversed before sending in the product for replacement.

    Some companies don't even cover OCs, but it all depends on the manufacturer's terms and conditions. I read all of mine so I know when I'm covered and when I'm not.


    @OP - Besides picking the right blocks and rads, the biggest logistical challenge is figuring out where you are going to mount the radiators.
    -Are you comfortable modding (i.e. drilling/cutting with something like a Dremel), because it generally requires at least some modification in even watercooling-ready cases (depends on brand and what you're doing).
    -Do you care if the loop is all internal or if parts are external (latter has many more options - usually you can get bigger rads).
  6. ^Yeah, it gets old when you see people posting in here (that you've never seen before, otherwise) and start offering up information that is completely incorrect. I have absolutely no problems giving people the credit the deserve when something is correct (even if I disagree or thought differently, otherwise), but sometimes it really gets absurd. $1000 can really get you into another plateau of cooling...
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