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BIOs ROM Checksum Error

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February 7, 2010 3:41:47 PM

Hello! I currently have an odd problem because I am working with some old technology because I really have no other choice. This computer provides the function as a data collector for an alignment machine, a tool used by auto technicians to straighten your wheel when your car mysteriously veers off course when highway driving, etc ( just for those who did'nt know .) The machine I used "kicked the bucket" due to a motherboard failure. This machine has a "Y2K Ready" sticker on it so it has definately seen better days. A refurbished machine costs 2,800 from "Snap-On" Inc. This machine consists of a 400MHz Processor, 64MB RAM, and a 10 GB Hard Drive. I am both tech and auto savvy so I know that this car tools dealer is trying to rip off people like me who they think don't know about computers. I am sorry for the huge introduction to the problem, but in other forums where I have found no answer, people ask a million questions on why I am trying to fix an old computer.

The situation is.... I got a "new old" computer to replace the dead 400MHz junker. The new computer has a Pentium 3,256MB Ram and a whopping 32GB hard drive. I got a "new old" computer because I need a motherboard with an ISA slot. The reason being, The card that receives the data from the alignment machine is ISA Based. It is an 8 Bit ISA Card ( you thought your new video card was big, this is a 14" bohemeth. ) The new computer is totally fuctional and boots like magic into Ubuntu. HOWEVER when I put the ISA Card into the computer and turn it on I get:
BIOS ROM checksum error
INSERT SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ENTER_

This only occurs when the needed card is inserted ( of course my luck )

I have spent the weekend searching the internet, I cannot find a motherboard manual for a ( Freetech P6F117 ), I cannot find any information about the ISA card. The Snap-On tech only wants to sell me a old P.O.S for 3Gs.... ( my new i7 build was only 800$ WTF!?) I am hoping I am not S.O.L. This machine makes money for my business so expediting the repair process is essential. Any help on why I would get that error with the card installed would be greatly appreciated.
a c 435 V Motherboard
February 7, 2010 4:20:32 PM

Go into the bios using the "del" key at posting and see if you have a "spread spectrum" setting. I disabled mine to get rid of the same error message.
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February 7, 2010 5:35:11 PM

http://www.motherboard.cz/mb/freetech/p6f117.htm

hope this helps...

where are you, i have still got some pentium 2 processor and motherboards in machines which still work

it seems that the motherboard you have is not compatible with 8 bit boards...

try a different slot on the motherboard as maybe the board is using an interupt which is used by something on the motherboard ( more than likely ) if i remember there was a manual setting for plug and play which had to be switched on try that.
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February 7, 2010 11:46:12 PM

To the first reply, one of the main problems is that I cannot enter bios with the card installed. Hellboy, I am located in Northern New Jersey. It is indeed an 8 Bit card but I read that the 8 bit cards are forwards compatible with 16 bit motherboards. I would actually hope you are right that it is a compatibilty issue.... even tho i drove an hr to get this "new old pc" its better to find another working 8 bit computer than to spend 3000$
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February 8, 2010 5:43:20 AM

dam , im in the uk...

some where in the states there will be a pentium 2 board with what you need, if the worst comes to the worst ill ship it to you.. ill test it first, but youll have to pay shipping... Ill send it by post to reduce the cost..
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a b V Motherboard
February 8, 2010 2:23:04 PM

Ok, one of the first things you have to understand is their is a reason machines like this are $2800. How would you like to pay 25 grand for a Docutech RIP? We have 3 of them. I could build the exact PC for about $500 easy, but there is a lot more to it than you may think. What you pay for is the software and the technology, not the PC. And I guarantee you that the company who makes this machine have went to exteme lengths to make sure that the software, and any specific hardware required will only work with their equipment.
Now I am sure there are ways around it. But in my experience, it is troublesome, time consuming, expensive, and the end result is often a buggy acting piece of hardware/sopftware or machine that won't work 100% as it should.
So before you start down that road of "I can do for 10 times less money" you had better make sure you understand exactly what you may be up against.
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