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SSD functionality questions

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June 7, 2011 10:12:11 AM

I read in another thread that an SSD will boost your boot up times and application load times, both of which I knew, but it was also said that it will not make applications work faster after being loaded. I am not a computer genius but I thought that a game, for example, would have to "get" certain graphics files, sound files, etc. etc. based on entering a new area, or talking to a game NPC, etc.

#1 So, please tell me would an SSD speed up a game's running speed? Or only its load time?

#2 Also, I read that the hard drive is almost always the bottleneck on a system. Is that the case? Is the hard drive the best thing with which going over the top is a good decision($400 120GB 740Mbps read speed)?

#3 At what point, if any, are faster read speeds negligible?

Thanks.

edit: #4 Will an SSD boost anything besides computer's boot time, application load times, and system temperature? Is that it?
June 7, 2011 1:06:56 PM

1. It would only speed up load times

2. It depends, but i would just get a wd caviar black for a good performance hard drive

3. opening a program, saving, loading

4. yes
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June 7, 2011 2:40:44 PM

doginpants said:
1. It would only speed up load times

2. It depends, but i would just get a wd caviar black for a good performance hard drive

3. opening a program, saving, loading

4. yes


For question 3, I asked "At what point, if any, are faster read speeds negligible? " meaning at what speed will I not notice much difference?

Also, am I wrong about an application needing to "get" files and an SSD being able to affect that speed? If so, on which part am I wrong?
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a c 415 G Storage
June 7, 2011 4:24:16 PM

Because disks are so slow (compared to the CPU chip), most programs try to load everything they need into memory so that they can access it much faster. Once a program is loaded, it often doesn't need to use the disk any more. In that case, a fast disk will help with load time, but that's about it. Examples of this are programs such as word processors, spreadsheets, photo editors, etc.

Other programs may need to access the disk as they run. The more a program needs to do this, bigger performance improvement you'll see if you put the files it's accessing on an SSD. Typical examples of this would be video editing or batch processing changes to of a folder full of photos.

As far as games go, it depends entirely on the game. You can't really make generalizations - some games load everything up at startup, and other games may load additional data as scenes change or as new characters or objects come onto the screen. The speed-up you'd see with an SSD (assuming the necessary files are ON the SSD) depends on whether the game does this and how often during gameplay you trigger something that requires data from the drive.
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June 18, 2011 9:14:28 PM

Best answer selected by timothy2180.
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