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New to WaterCooling

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October 21, 2011 6:41:32 PM

Hi im new to watercooling but would like to start doing it on my new setup.
Intel i7-2600k/Maximus Extreme IV Z/ Cooler Master Haf X case. I dont know what would be a good kit to do some good overclocking with or would it be possible to jsut stick with a NH D14. Any help is greatly appreciated Thanks :) 

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a c 324 K Overclocking
October 21, 2011 7:08:04 PM

Glad to see you here! The HAF X...someone else is currently working on a planned build in that case: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/269940-29-what-liquid-cooling

Have you read through the watercooling sticky? I have it linked below in my signature...has a lot of info to help you answer some questions and get you familiar with what you'll want to plan for.
a b K Overclocking
October 21, 2011 8:10:41 PM

As noted in a number of threads H2O cooling is more a hobby than a set-and-forget type of PC CPU cooling system. The link below has test data on the popular air-cooled HSF and some H2O units for comparison. If you just want a quality CPU cooler that you can install and forget, then I recommend the air-cooled HSFs.

If you want to explore H2O cooling as a hobby then the other links should help get you started. H2O cooling is considerably more expensive for little gains however. I do not recommend the closed loop H2O systems like Corsair, Antec, etc. as these are very inefficient and often less capable than the better air-cooled HSFs. In addition leaks on these closed loop systems have been know to damaged other PC components which doesn't happen with an air-cooled HSF.

http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm#INTELHEATSI...
Related resources
a c 324 K Overclocking
October 21, 2011 8:33:14 PM

Quote:
As noted in a number of threads H2O cooling is more a hobby than a set-and-forget type of PC CPU cooling system.


I've pretty much set-and-forgotten my watercooling loop. Yes, it requires more 'initial' setup and once a year maintenance, but other than that- a well built loop shouldn't have any issues. Yes, it is just as much hobby as it is cooling solution- which is the fantastic beauty of it all. Just because you express a fear of water next to electronics, doesn't mean you should attempt to sway people's opinions of avoiding it because 'it causes damage to components'.

I haven't touched the water, fitting or block in over a year. Same water has been in there about 2.5 years or so, with no issues.

Quote:
In addition leaks on these closed loop systems have been know to damaged other PC components which doesn't happen with an air-cooled HSF.

The vast, vast majority of LCS coolers don't leak- the ones that do are pretty much 2-3 years outdated anyway (Corsair H50).

To counter this, there are many people who have incorrectly installed air coolers and caused motherboard damage or heatsink damage due to breaking PCB or breaking/bending heatpipes. Also, I've heard of many people breaking off capacitors and components because they are trying to mount a cooler too tight, or apply too much force during install and causing motherboard damage.

I believe the real issue lies with people not reading directions, gaining knowledge, cutting corners or simply being careless- not that a specific cooling option is to blame for damage. While I completely agree with the majority of your statements, let's not be wrongly biased in the air-vs-watercooling preference.
a b K Overclocking
October 21, 2011 9:22:33 PM

^^^ I know you don't like me pointing out the short comings of H2O systems, but I think people should know the liabilities as there is little upside other than as a hobby. H2O system are expensive and offer poor value and higher risk that A/C systems which most folks do not realise until after they spend their money or suffer component damage from leaks.

Mobo damage is not limited to air-cooled HSF installation any more than it is with water-cooling blocks. People who are not properly trained or physically able could damage an armored tank... :(  At least with air-cooling you can set an alarm in the BIOS to shut the PC down if the CPU overheats. You can't set any alarm for water leaks. BTW, I am not fearful of water and electricity. It's a known fact they do not work well together and should be avoided for obvious reasons.

I personally do not care what people use as long as they know the facts and that the liabilities are not sugar coated. I believe my comments are accurate, fair and not biased one way or the other. People are free to chose whatever makes them happy as long as they have enough information to make an educated, informed decision - which I believe I have provided. If not then it's their obligation to educate themselves further.
a c 324 K Overclocking
October 21, 2011 10:07:05 PM

Well spoken counterpoints. I just like debating...even though I hated it in school. :) 
October 21, 2011 10:21:14 PM

Lol Reading through your post are very informative as well as entertaining. :)  To be honest i would much rather get a good Air Cooled setup to support an overclock. Unless there is some really straight forward Water cooling kits that are easy to use and low maintanence. Any ideas? :D 

Best solution

a c 324 K Overclocking
October 22, 2011 12:36:56 AM
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Rasa kits, they start around $130 and go to around $180. Less than $130? Stick to good air.
October 22, 2011 1:47:11 AM

Any suggestions on good air? NH D14 sounds good but will that support an overclocked cpu to like 4.5Ghz? And would i need more then just one? Thanks for replying
October 22, 2011 5:53:21 AM

rubix_1011 said:
Quote:
As noted in a number of threads H2O cooling is more a hobby than a set-and-forget type of PC CPU cooling system.


I've pretty much set-and-forgotten my watercooling loop. Yes, it requires more 'initial' setup and once a year maintenance, but other than that- a well built loop shouldn't have any issues. Yes, it is just as much hobby as it is cooling solution- which is the fantastic beauty of it all. Just because you express a fear of water next to electronics, doesn't mean you should attempt to sway people's opinions of avoiding it because 'it causes damage to components'.

I haven't touched the water, fitting or block in over a year. Same water has been in there about 2.5 years or so, with no issues.

Quote:
In addition leaks on these closed loop systems have been know to damaged other PC components which doesn't happen with an air-cooled HSF.

The vast, vast majority of LCS coolers don't leak- the ones that do are pretty much 2-3 years outdated anyway (Corsair H50).

To counter this, there are many people who have incorrectly installed air coolers and caused motherboard damage or heatsink damage due to breaking PCB or breaking/bending heatpipes. Also, I've heard of many people breaking off capacitors and components because they are trying to mount a cooler too tight, or apply too much force during install and causing motherboard damage.

I believe the real issue lies with people not reading directions, gaining knowledge, cutting corners or simply being careless- not that a specific cooling option is to blame for damage. While I completely agree with the majority of your statements, let's not be wrongly biased in the air-vs-watercooling preference.


Shouldn't feed the trolls.
October 23, 2011 1:46:53 AM

Best answer selected by Shmister.
a c 205 K Overclocking
October 23, 2011 7:49:30 PM

This topic has been closed by 4ryan6
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