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User viewing only their own drive/folder in XP Home

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  • Configuration
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
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Anonymous
July 28, 2004 1:45:19 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

I have a P3 733MHz machine running XP Home, with a 8GB
drive (FAT32) running windows and a 80GB drive partitioned
into 4 drives (NTFS). I wish to link a user with a drive
and allow them to only see that drive for using as they
like.
Currently all users can see all drives making
the "password" logon redundant.
How do I allow user1 to view and work with only drive G,
user2 - drive H etc? As the administrator I will be
loading software for all to use on the 8GB drive. However,
the other users will be able to install softeware for
their own use on their own drive.
Can this be done or do I need to upgrade to XP
Professional? and change the 8GB drive to NTFS? Any help
would be appreciated.
Thanks

More about : user viewing drive folder home

Anonymous
July 29, 2004 1:52:16 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

To restrict user actions, you will need to implement Group Policy. Since
Windows XP Home Edition does not have Group Policy, you will require
Windows XP Professional Edition to implement Group Policy.

Using Group Policy you can set a variety of software, computer, and user
policies. For example, you can define the various components of the user's
desktop environment, such as the programs that are available to users, the
icons that appear on the user's desktop, the Start menu options, which
users can modify their desktops and which cannot, and so on. You also use
Group Policy set user rights.

User rights are rules that determine the actions a user can perform on a
computer. In addition, user rights control whether a user can log on to a
computer directly (locally) or over the network, add users to local groups,
delete users, and so on. Built-in groups have sets of user rights already
assigned. Administrators usually assign user rights by adding a user
account to one of the built-in groups or by creating a new group and
assigning specific user rights to that group. Users who are subsequently
added to a group are automatically granted all user rights assigned to the
group account. User rights are managed using Group Policy.

Srikanth N
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
Anonymous
July 29, 2004 1:52:17 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

Thanks very much. I thought as much but the Help in XP
Home "tells you" that it is possible. I did try to produce
a network and the system "says" it was successful but it
didn't make any difference.

>-----Original Message-----
>To restrict user actions, you will need to implement
Group Policy. Since
>Windows XP Home Edition does not have Group Policy, you
will require
>Windows XP Professional Edition to implement Group
Policy.
>
>Using Group Policy you can set a variety of software,
computer, and user
>policies. For example, you can define the various
components of the user's
>desktop environment, such as the programs that are
available to users, the
>icons that appear on the user's desktop, the Start menu
options, which
>users can modify their desktops and which cannot, and so
on. You also use
>Group Policy set user rights.
>
>User rights are rules that determine the actions a user
can perform on a
>computer. In addition, user rights control whether a user
can log on to a
>computer directly (locally) or over the network, add
users to local groups,
>delete users, and so on. Built-in groups have sets of
user rights already
>assigned. Administrators usually assign user rights by
adding a user
>account to one of the built-in groups or by creating a
new group and
>assigning specific user rights to that group. Users who
are subsequently
>added to a group are automatically granted all user
rights assigned to the
>group account. User rights are managed using Group
Policy.
>
>Srikanth N
>This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and
confers no rights.
>
>.
>
!