Repairing laptops

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I am looking to buy a laptop and am wondering about the warranty. I
am very good with computers and can crack a desktop open and replace
cards etc with no problem. I can't say I've ever opened up a laptop,
though. Are they difficult to work on and should I get a big warranty
so I dont have to mess with it, or is it just basically smaller with
no big reason to worry? Thanks
12 answers Last reply
More about repairing laptops
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Jeff wrote:
    > I am looking to buy a laptop and am wondering about the warranty. I
    > am very good with computers and can crack a desktop open and replace
    > cards etc with no problem. I can't say I've ever opened up a laptop,
    > though. Are they difficult to work on and should I get a big warranty
    > so I dont have to mess with it, or is it just basically smaller with
    > no big reason to worry? Thanks

    There is very little in a laptop that a user can repair, especially
    anything having to do with the mainboard. A good warranty is essential.

    Q
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    So is this from Dell worthwhile:
    3 Year Limited Warranty plus 3 Year Mail-In Service [add $120 or $3/month1]

    I'm not familiar with the failure rate of laptops, so what would you do?


    "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message news:<QLmdnf6b39tkCTzdRVn-hQ@comcast.com>...
    > Jeff wrote:
    > > I am looking to buy a laptop and am wondering about the warranty. I
    > > am very good with computers and can crack a desktop open and replace
    > > cards etc with no problem. I can't say I've ever opened up a laptop,
    > > though. Are they difficult to work on and should I get a big warranty
    > > so I dont have to mess with it, or is it just basically smaller with
    > > no big reason to worry? Thanks
    >
    > There is very little in a laptop that a user can repair, especially
    > anything having to do with the mainboard. A good warranty is essential.
    >
    > Q
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Jeff wrote:
    >
    > So is this from Dell worthwhile:
    > 3 Year Limited Warranty plus 3 Year Mail-In Service [add $120 or $3/month1]
    >
    > I'm not familiar with the failure rate of laptops, so what would you do?

    First, parts, in a laptop, are not as easily replaceable as those in a desktop.
    (You can't just pop-in and pop-out cards.)

    Having said that, warrantees are just another form of insurance. You get them
    and hope you'll never need them.

    Get what you can afford. Personally, I never purchase a "mail-in" policy. The
    last thing I need/want to do is have to take the time/effort to package and
    send my computer somewhere. Not to mention that it's much more time consuming
    than having a tech show up at your door.

    My desktops (both Dell) have their "Same Day 4-Hour 5x10 Parts and Labor On-Site
    Response" warranty, while my laptop has their "Next Business Day Parts and Labor
    On-Site Response" warranty. For me, having my systems up, and running, are a
    necessity, not just a luxury.

    Larry
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Laptops are totally different than desktops, and you have very little
    chance of repairing one yourself. Also, parts are VERY difficult to get
    (almost impossible, with the exception of hard drives and memory).

    I do recommend an extended warranty on a laptop. Preferably, in most
    cases, from the manufacturer rather than the retailer. If you are
    buying a Toshiba, get the "systemguard" warranty, which covers
    accidental damage (including screen breakage) as well as "failures".
    Most other warranties do not cover accidental physical damage.


    Jeff wrote:

    > I am looking to buy a laptop and am wondering about the warranty. I
    > am very good with computers and can crack a desktop open and replace
    > cards etc with no problem. I can't say I've ever opened up a laptop,
    > though. Are they difficult to work on and should I get a big warranty
    > so I dont have to mess with it, or is it just basically smaller with
    > no big reason to worry? Thanks
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Barry Watzman wrote:
    >
    > Laptops are totally different than desktops, and you have very little
    > chance of repairing one yourself.

    Only if your a moron or cant read a manual. I've disassembled and rebuilt a lot
    of Thinkpads down to the last screws, so you've got the wrong answer.

    >Also, parts are VERY difficult to get (almost impossible, with the exception of
    hard drives and memory).

    Again, wrong answer. Apparently you've never been on eBay searching for parts,
    either didnt think of it or didnt know how.

    > I do recommend an extended warranty on a laptop. Preferably, in most
    > cases, from the manufacturer rather than the retailer. If you are
    > buying a Toshiba, get the "systemguard" warranty, which covers
    > accidental damage (including screen breakage) as well as "failures".
    > Most other warranties do not cover accidental physical damage.

    If you're buying IBM you wouldnt need the extended warranty.

    > Jeff wrote:
    >
    > > I am looking to buy a laptop and am wondering about the warranty. I
    > > am very good with computers and can crack a desktop open and replace
    > > cards etc with no problem. I can't say I've ever opened up a laptop,
    > > though. Are they difficult to work on and should I get a big warranty
    > > so I dont have to mess with it, or is it just basically smaller with
    > > no big reason to worry? Thanks

    Follow the hardware manual's directions on opening and replacing components.
    It's that hard.

    TJ
    =========================================================================
    The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Judging by the varied responses, I'm not sure if I should opt for a
    big warranty or just attempt the work myself. How do laptops hold up
    in comparison to desktops? I use my desktop constantly and it has
    treated me very well. Think a big warranty is worth a few hundred
    bucks?

    Jeff


    "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC" <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote in message news:<40A3AE8A.C1E84972@cableaz.com>...
    > Barry Watzman wrote:
    > >
    > > Laptops are totally different than desktops, and you have very little
    > > chance of repairing one yourself.
    >
    > Only if your a moron or cant read a manual. I've disassembled and rebuilt a lot
    > of Thinkpads down to the last screws, so you've got the wrong answer.
    >
    > >Also, parts are VERY difficult to get (almost impossible, with the exception of
    > hard drives and memory).
    >
    > Again, wrong answer. Apparently you've never been on eBay searching for parts,
    > either didnt think of it or didnt know how.
    >
    > > I do recommend an extended warranty on a laptop. Preferably, in most
    > > cases, from the manufacturer rather than the retailer. If you are
    > > buying a Toshiba, get the "systemguard" warranty, which covers
    > > accidental damage (including screen breakage) as well as "failures".
    > > Most other warranties do not cover accidental physical damage.
    >
    > If you're buying IBM you wouldnt need the extended warranty.
    >
    > > Jeff wrote:
    > >
    > > > I am looking to buy a laptop and am wondering about the warranty. I
    > > > am very good with computers and can crack a desktop open and replace
    > > > cards etc with no problem. I can't say I've ever opened up a laptop,
    > > > though. Are they difficult to work on and should I get a big warranty
    > > > so I dont have to mess with it, or is it just basically smaller with
    > > > no big reason to worry? Thanks
    >
    > Follow the hardware manual's directions on opening and replacing components.
    > It's that hard.
    >
    > TJ
    > =========================================================================
    > The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    On Thu, 13 May 2004 17:21:15 GMT, "Capt. Wild Bill Kelso, USAAC"
    <Dec7.1941@cableaz.com> wrote:

    >If you're buying IBM you wouldnt need the extended warranty.
    >

    OK, now, I'm as pro-ThinkPad as anyone, but that's just silly.
    Extended warranties are a Good Thing even for ThinkPads.

    Nonny
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    On 13 May 2004 18:57:32 -0700, jeff6523@hotmail.com (Jeff) wrote:

    >Judging by the varied responses, I'm not sure if I should opt for a
    >big warranty or just attempt the work myself. How do laptops hold up
    >in comparison to desktops? I use my desktop constantly and it has
    >treated me very well. Think a big warranty is worth a few hundred
    >bucks?
    >
    >Jeff
    <snip>

    Probably each person's opinion will vary with his experience. My first
    Thinkpad was a 365XD, on which I bought a 3 year warranty and never
    used it. In fact, it's been about 6 years now, and the computer is
    still working perfectly. So just over a year ago I bought an A30, and
    opted "not" to get the warranty. Just after the 1 year factory
    warranty expired, I experienced a problem in the AC charging circuitry
    (inside the computer). Two separate opinions on repair later indicates
    that I have an expensive paperweight. So my next Thinkpad (a T-42
    maybe?) will definitely have an extended warranty... and I'll probably
    never have the occasion to use it.

    Charlie Hoffpauir
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    "Charlie" <invalid@invalid.com> wrote in message
    news:7vj9a01ock5kjug74ctimut9q0rlj6v1to@4ax.com...
    > On 13 May 2004 18:57:32 -0700, jeff6523@hotmail.com (Jeff) wrote:
    >
    > >Judging by the varied responses, I'm not sure if I should opt for a
    > >big warranty or just attempt the work myself. How do laptops hold up
    > >in comparison to desktops? I use my desktop constantly and it has
    > >treated me very well. Think a big warranty is worth a few hundred
    > >bucks?
    > >
    > >Jeff
    > <snip>
    >
    > Probably each person's opinion will vary with his experience. My first
    > Thinkpad was a 365XD, on which I bought a 3 year warranty and never
    > used it. In fact, it's been about 6 years now, and the computer is
    > still working perfectly. So just over a year ago I bought an A30, and
    > opted "not" to get the warranty. Just after the 1 year factory
    > warranty expired, I experienced a problem in the AC charging circuitry
    > (inside the computer). Two separate opinions on repair later indicates
    > that I have an expensive paperweight. So my next Thinkpad (a T-42
    > maybe?) will definitely have an extended warranty... and I'll probably
    > never have the occasion to use it.
    >
    > Charlie Hoffpauir
    > http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/

    My 365XD has been the same as yours. The only thing to need replacing was
    the battery. My daughter is still using it. A tribute to the toughness of
    older Thinkpads. I vote for the extended warranty on any new laptop
    regardless of make.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Charlie wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > So my next Thinkpad (a T-42 maybe?) will definitely have an extended
    > warranty... and I'll probably never have the occasion to use it.

    It's one of Murphy's corollaries... Buy it and you'll never need it,
    don't buy it and you will! <g>

    Larry
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Well, a couple of more comments (I was someone who suggested that you
    probably would not be able to make repairs yourself).

    Availability of both parts and service information varies widely by make
    and model. For most laptops, neither is readily available, but there
    are exceptions. You can always look for a complete laptop on E-Bay with
    a problem different than you have as a source of parts, but that's
    hit-or-miss, and can still be expensive.

    The parts in laptops are very specialized, and people routinely destroy
    comptuers because they don't know about even the simplest things. A
    very good example is the destruction of flex cables (the flat ribbon
    cables widely used in laptops) because people don't know about, or how
    to work, the ZIF connectors that they plug into.

    Finally, if you don't have a warranty, repairs are VERY expensive. You
    can replace a failed hard drive, or PLUG-IN memory, but that's about it.
    Most other repairs end up involving the LCD or motherboard, and in
    either case, you are looking at more than $500 (and "more than" $500 can
    be closer to $1,000).

    All extended warranties are not created equal. Where offered, the best
    ones are usually the ones from the mfgr., not the stores. Find out
    about LCD coverage for BREAKAGE as well as "failure", and also about
    battery coverage. Most warranties do not cover either, but the Toshiba
    SYSTEMGUARD warranty does covery LCD breakage (Toshiba sells others as
    well that don't cover this), and Best Buy's warranty does cover
    batteries. Verify that the written warranty agrees with what you are
    told by the salesman.


    Jeff wrote:
    > I am looking to buy a laptop and am wondering about the warranty. I
    > am very good with computers and can crack a desktop open and replace
    > cards etc with no problem. I can't say I've ever opened up a laptop,
    > though. Are they difficult to work on and should I get a big warranty
    > so I dont have to mess with it, or is it just basically smaller with
    > no big reason to worry? Thanks
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    I think you are correct. I know the hardware in a laptop is a lot different
    from the desktop components, but judging by all of the laptop parts being
    sold on eBay - it sure looks like a lot of people out there are doing laptop
    repairs and assemblies. I wouldn't hesitate to do the same. The only
    downside I can see is the price of laptop motherboards. They seem to cost
    almost as much as the entire laptop.

    By the way, I assume you were in the AAC. Thank you for being there when
    this country needed you.
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