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I7-2600K vs i7-2700K

So my question is, would a 2700K be capable of higher overclocking performance than a 2600K? I'm new to overclocking and I'm sticking with air cooling, so I'll be making sure to stay well within the margin of stability.
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  1. Best answer
    Not impossible if the 2700K is a "higher binned 2600K", but the difference could be minimal as it's probably exactly the same innards with a higher base multiplier. BTW, depending on what you want to do with the PC, 2600K might already be a waste of money (ex: for gaming the difference between 2500K and 2600K is minimal to none).
  2. I do highly multithreaded 3D rendering (with Mental Ray, uses 100% of CPU) and I'm looking to get as much power as I can out of a $300-$400 CPU. What does "higher binned" mean?
  3. it means better parts. if you are looking to overclock a lot it will probably help squeeze out a few hundred mhz.
  4. So if the 2700K comes from a better stock than the 2600K, then it will be more stable while overclocking?
  5. Not to mention, 2700k has lower stock voltage. Cant wait to get some reviews on it...
  6. the only difference i found in 2600k vs 2700k is that 2700k is only 100mhz faster.
  7. Thanks for the help everyone. I also found this someone posted in another thread useful:
    Quote:
    I've been considering going Sandy Bridge for a while now and I'd like to achieve safe stable 24/7 clocks in the upper 4's to 5 Ghz if possible. Could I do that on a 2600K? Yea, probably. But to me a "safe stable 24/7 clock" is one that passes significant time on prime 95 (10+ hours) and never exceeds 70-72 on the cores. I have a much better chance of achieving that with a 2700K than 2600K.
  8. IG-64 said:
    I do highly multithreaded 3D rendering (with Mental Ray, uses 100% of CPU) and I'm looking to get as much power as I can out of a $300-$400 CPU.
    Might be out of your budget, but for that usage have you considered the i7-970/980? They are in the 550$ range, but a hexa-cores (6 cores) and support triple-channel memory. Or you could also wait for the i7-3930K (Ivy Bridge) also a 6 cores, but that will support quad-channel memory also, but possibly ~600$.
  9. Zenthar said:
    Might be out of your budget, but for that usage have you considered the i7-970/980? They are in the 550$ range, but a hexa-cores (6 cores) and support triple-channel memory. Or you could also wait for the i7-3930K (Ivy Bridge) also a 6 cores, but that will support quad-channel memory also, but possibly ~600$.

    Yes, I'm getting other parts for a new rig as well, so that's out of my budget. Plus I would really prefer Sandy Bridge over Gulftown. As much as I want to get an Ivy Bridge, I think my best bet is going to be the i7-2700K right now. Then I have the option of getting a separate Ivy Bridge rig later on down the road when I have the cash, so I can run both with network rendering. For now my current goal is to have a new build within the month.

    Thanks for your help. :)
  10. Best answer selected by IG-64.
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