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GA-X58A-UD3R (rev. 1.0) 1600 MHz support?

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February 12, 2010 8:50:33 PM

According to Gigabytes website the GA-X58A-UD3R (rev. 1.0) motherboard supports what is written below.


1. 6 x 1.5V DDR3 DIMM sockets supporting up to 24 GB of system memory(Note 1)
2. Dual/3 channel memory architecture
3. Support for DDR3 2200/1333/1066/800 MHz memory modules
4. Support for non-ECC memory modules
5. Support for Extreme Memory Profile (XMP) memory modules

My question is, Will the board support 1600 MHZ memory for overclocking or do I need purchase 2200 MHz memory if I want to go above 1333 MHz modules?

This is what I am considering.
CORSAIR XMS3 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMX6GX3M3C1600C7 - Retail
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

G.SKILL PI Series 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL7T-6GBPI - Retail
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I am also concerned about an after market CPU cooler not clearing the G.Skill modules.

a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
February 13, 2010 12:09:32 AM

If you look on the memory support list:
http://www.gigabyte.us/Products/Motherboard/Products_Ov...
you will see most of a page of 1600; there is no real-world reason to pay for fast memory - memory frequency on i7/i5 does not scale to increased, observable system speed - it's only good for bragging rights, and 'synthetic' memory benchmarking (that's why it's called 'synthetic!) - unless you're running a rendering station, or transcoding a huge amount of video. Pay for the lowest latency 1333 or even 1066 you can afford - it'll make your life easier when you go to OC, it'll save considerable money, and you won't have any need for elaborate heat-spreaders. Your processor is never, ever, ever, accessing large amounts of contiguous memory at a time - the only place where high memory frequencies 'shine' - it's always getting dribs and drabs from here and there, every clock tick - that's why latency is the key - every time you call for the contents of another block of RAM, you're waiting on one or another latency cycle...
February 19, 2010 10:09:54 PM

I have same mobo and CMX6GX3M3C1600C7 (same ram) now, still could not set it to 1600 factory settings. Enabling XPM, system crashes -> blue screen. Let me know if you have some suggestions. (CPU = 920 stock)
Related resources
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
February 19, 2010 10:35:58 PM

What does "Load Optimized" give you with XMP disabled?
February 21, 2010 10:38:49 AM

Quote:
there is no real-world reason to pay for fast memory - memory frequency on i7/i5 does not scale to increased, observable system speed - it's only good for bragging rights, and 'synthetic' memory benchmarking (that's why it's called 'synthetic!) - unless you're running a rendering station, or transcoding a huge amount of video


I am just about to build a system using this mobo and I bought 3x2G DDR3 RAM running at 1600 before I realized the mobo documentation says it only supports 2200/1333/1066/800. But you said the 1600 RAM might still pay off when rendering video. I plan to use this system to edit HD video. How will this mobo use the 1600 speed RAM? Should I send the RAM back to newegg and buy 1333 instead?
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
February 21, 2010 4:46:26 PM

Once again, I refer to the official GB memory support page:
http://www.gigabyte.us/FileList/MemorySupport/mb_memory...
It shows 22 different manufacturer's part numbers, 10 of which were capable of running 6 DIMMs, at 1600... The memory you have may or may not run properly simply by running the BIOS' "Load Optimized" function; whether it says it supports XMP or not, doing the "Load Optimized" with XMP enabled may or may not work. Processing video is likely the very best case application to benefit from a high memory clock, as huge sequential accesses are required. The only way you can confirm whether your particular memory (short of confirmation from someone else who has the same memory and motherboard already working...) will work 'out of the box' is to try it. If you are unable to get it 'automatically' configured, either with or without XMP, it still may be possible to 'tweak' it into working, perhaps with support from the manufacturer. What I am saying is not that it won't work, but that I, overall, have seen a huge difference in the number of problems presented by people whose memory is 1333 or 1066 (i.e., actually supported, by Intel, on the 1156/1366 platforms), versus the nearly universal (and sometime insoluble) troubles with 1600-2133; my belief is that the vast majority of these users are being 'hosed' by the memory manufacturers, simply to obtain a larger share of a higher margin market - regardless of who suffers for it!
February 22, 2010 11:24:59 AM

Thanks bilbat for your input. The memory I bought (OCZ3G1600LV6GK on newegg) was on Gigabytes Qualified Vendors List. I'll let you know how it all goes in a few days.
February 26, 2010 7:17:29 AM

lwhieldon said:
Thanks bilbat for your input. The memory I bought (OCZ3G1600LV6GK on newegg) was on Gigabytes Qualified Vendors List. I'll let you know how it all goes in a few days.


how'd it go? i'm going the same way soon i think.
February 28, 2010 2:17:20 AM

The build went very well with no BIOS changes needed prior to installing Windows 7 (which also installed easily). The BIOS did show the 6.0 GB RAM installed at 1066 Mhz and in tri channel. I went onto OCZ's forums (excellent and well organized), and got a very quick personalized email response from their staff (read: excellent customer support). Here's what I've learned. The core i7-920 doesn't support 1600 Mhz RAM so I would need to overclock the CPU and memory to achieve the 1600MHz RAM speeds. I'll cut and paste below exactly what the technician at OCZ (OCZRoy) told me to do to run the 6GB of RAM (OCZ3G1600LV6GK) on the GA-X58A-UDR (BIOS version F1) motherboard v1.0:

****START***
Lloyd:

Yes you must adjust the Base Clock Frequency upward manually to correspond to 1600 DDR DRAM Frequency.
Yes this over-clocks the CPU so make sure you are covered thermally.

Set the QPI/VTT Voltage to {1.35 volts}
DRAM Voltage to {1.65 volts}
Set tRFC to {88}
Set Command Rate to {2}
Set DRAM Timings to CL 8-8-8-24 (CL-TRCD-TRP-TRAS)

***END***

I haven't tried this yet because I'm using the stock cooler and the CPU is running at temperatures of 60-80C. I've never overclocked and I won't until after I get a better cooler, per the advice from OCZ. But also, because 1) I'm a novice and 2) I'm not convinced the benefits of overclocking will overcome the risks (i.e. shorter CPU life, possible damage etc.). And I've no idea how much the above settings will 'stress' the i7. But if anyone reading this post tries the above overclocking, please post the results. Incidentally, and I still think this is relevant to this post, I read a very interesting article on core i7's temperatures on this site:

http://www.pugetsystems.com/blog/2009/02/26/intel-core-...

In retrospect, I perhaps would have bought 12GB of 1066Mhz memory instead of 6GB of 1666!
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
February 28, 2010 12:13:50 PM

Glad it went well for you, and glad to see another memory manufacturer providing decent (and accurate!) support :) 

Quote:
In retrospect, I perhaps would have bought 12GB of 1066Mhz memory instead of 6GB of 1666!


That is always what I recommend - check which your CPU supports - 1066 or 1333, and spend your money on the :sol:  lowest latency RAM you can afford at those respective speeds
February 28, 2010 10:22:04 PM

I thought I might add a comment here on this subject, may or may not apply. I have the same MOBO with a core i7-920 OC'd to 3.2 GHz (BCLK set to 160) using a Corsair H50 self contained liquid cooling system. My RAM is 2 kits of Corsair CMX6GX3M3A1600C9, XMP compliant for a total of 12 Gig. I have the CPU voltage set at 1.25 and the RAM set at "PROFILE" in the BIOS XMP settings which forces the voltage to 1.65, the clocks @ 9,9,9,24,2 and the multiplier to 12 which gives you 1800MHz. I set the multiplier back to 10 which dropped that number to 1600MHz. All other settings are on "AUTO". I ran Prime95 for 12 hours and did 4 passes with Memtest 4 and have had no problems. I originally had the CPU set to 1.35v but I was getting core temps in the high 60's to low 70's, when I reduced the voltage to 1.25 the temps dropped to the mid 60's never exceeding 66C. I'm new at this and have only been OC'ing for 3 weeks and through trial and error have found that CPU voltage has a direct effect on the CORE temps and (at least on the Gigabyte UD3R) the X58. (I believe that Gigabyte could have done a better job on the X58 and VR heat sinks.) In other words no matter what you do keep an eye in the MCH temps in the 'PC HEALTH' section of the bios, as the core temps rise so does the MCH (Memory Control Hub). Water cooling seems to be the best bet here.
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
February 28, 2010 10:43:48 PM

Be aware that Tcase-max for the X58 IOH is 111°C, Tcontrol is 107°C...

Quote:
as the core temps rise so does the MCH (Memory Control Hub)

...there is no MCH in 1156/1366 platforms - the CPU contains the memory controller functions, that's why they transitioned to 'IOH' - input/output hub
March 1, 2010 2:33:01 AM

As I said I'm new at this and when I spoke to Gigabyte tech support about the high 'MCH' temps reported by the BIOS 'PC HEALTH' section THEY said that what I was seeing was the temp of the x58 and that it was 'normal'. I didn't mean to mislead anyone just pass along a 'heads up'.
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
March 1, 2010 1:08:58 PM

Sorry, wasn't being critical - just didn't want misinformation 'propagating' :??:  Tech suppot at GB seems to be 'tiered', and I think the first person you'll hear from probably doesn't have that much command of English, or electronics - is, pretty much, reading off a 'canned' list of responses (and I can't be critical there, either - I'm trying to learn Mandarin, and am continually amazed that the Chinese can learn to, say, write their name by age thirty-five!) - but I looked in a couple manuals, and - MCH! The BIOS writer certainly should have known better :kaola: 

Anyway, they are made to run hot - in a 1U server with passive cooling, it's not uncommon to see 5520s (the 'server equivalent' of an X58) at eighty-five or ninety...
March 1, 2010 1:53:38 PM

Thanks for the info, bilbat, every time I'm fed a new fact I feel my 'education' is progressing! That said then I have to ask, considering the high temps the X58 is designed to run at, is there any point/advantage to changing over the passive cooling provided by Gigabyte to a liquid cooled system? To do the X58 you must also convert one of the Vregs (there are 2). I mean does it even make sense to do anything other than the CPU? And good luck on the Mandarin!
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
March 1, 2010 2:12:41 PM

It used to be you cooled the MCH if you intended to overclock memory (anything higher than 2-800); with no memory controller, now, I think it depends on what you intend to 'hump through' the PCIe slots; I'm planning a rebuild in the next year or so, with a Tyan server board & a pair of 5520s; as I intend to use three x16s (two for rendering, and one for OpenCL) and an x8 (Areca RAID), pretty much 'wide open', I will likely put it all under water, including a block for an Areca card's IOP341, which runs hotter than hell... If you're only using a graphics card or two that don't really 'fill' a x16 'pipe, it probably is overkill :na: 
March 4, 2010 1:17:21 AM

I'm also in the process of a similar overclock. I'm working with an i7 920, the X58a-ud3r and 2x2GB G.Skill Trident ddr3-2000. Overclocking the processor went smoothly using an overclocking guide provided by Gigabyte for their ex58 extreme motherboard. In the guide they overclock the processor to 4GHz. I decided to only go to 3.8GHz because I am more comfortable with the temperatures. I am getting max temps from coreTemp of 69C while running prime95. Im using a cooler master v8 cpu cooler.

The only thing in this guide that I didnt follow was the recommended qpi/vtt voltage. The guide recommends 1.5xx volts. When I adjust this setting the voltage values turn red above 1.3xx volts. Does this mean that values in red are above the recommended max volts for the board. Does the ex58 extreme board tolerate higher voltages here or are they setting this at a value that is red.

Overall though I found this guide very helpful for oc'ing the cpu. I only wish that it went a little further and then helped step up the ram frequency which it has you lower before oc'ing the cpu. Sorry for not posting a link to the guide in this post. I will follow up with the links in a post to follow.
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
March 4, 2010 1:52:20 PM

I think you're referring to the second of this pair:
http://www.mediafire.com/?txzi1tmf22g
http://www.mediafire.com/?5moyzjmqvtv
The business of 'color coding' items in the BIOS is pretty vague; it will differ by BIOS rev, and often seems to make little sense... Example: for most of the 775 MCHs, the DDR2 supply voltage 'turns red' at 2.1 (or +0.3, depending on how it's expressed by the BIOS), even though nearly every piece of DDR2 faster than 800 needs 2.1 to run 'at speed' :pt1cable: 
April 15, 2010 6:38:17 PM

I have a question !
i've GA-X58A-UD3R (rev. 1.0)
3x2 1600mhz kingston hyperx
i7 930 2.8ghz

in bios default freq. of memory 1066mhz when i change it to 1600mhz automatically changes cpu clock to 2.9 ghz

how to tune it right both of them i need default cpu 2.8 and memory on 1600mhz
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
April 15, 2010 7:10:29 PM

Do you have TurboBoost enabled?
April 16, 2010 7:43:08 AM

yep
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
April 16, 2010 12:43:42 PM

TB is likely 'bumping up' the frequency when only one core is loaded...
June 12, 2010 4:02:24 AM

uzbek said:
I have a question !
i've GA-X58A-UD3R (rev. 1.0)
3x2 1600mhz kingston hyperx
i7 930 2.8ghz

in bios default freq. of memory 1066mhz when i change it to 1600mhz automatically changes cpu clock to 2.9 ghz

how to tune it right both of them i need default cpu 2.8 and memory on 1600mhz


Hi, im not from USA (sorry about my english). Please i need your help, i want tu buy exactly what u have, Motherboard Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R, 3X2Gb Kingston 1600 HiperX and Intel Core i7 930. I read a lot about 1600Mhz Ram that does not run at 1600Mhz, only at 1066. Its that true?. Can u tell me please about your system, how is your motherboard working?, what speed is running your ram. Thanks for your help.

Frankie Ray
June 14, 2010 11:13:08 PM

I just built this system.

GA-X58A-UD3R (rev. 1.0) bios F5
3x2 1600mhz (OCZ3G1600LV6GK)
i7 930 2.8ghz intel
1tb Seagate Barracuda sata drive
2 - DVD burners
Radeon XFX HD 4890 1gb GDDR5
CPU Cooler Hyper 212 plus
932 HAF HIGH AIR FLOW FULL TOWER CHASSIS

Its a great system, however, the memory only runs at 1066mhz without overclocking in the bios. I was hoping one of the bios updates on gigabytes website would help with the memory as they have serveral bios updates but none have worked for me as of yet. So for all of you who are going to run any 1600mhz memory with this mobo be expecting to OC to get it to run at 1600mhz.
Anonymous
a b } Memory
a b V Motherboard
June 17, 2010 6:06:28 AM

atpdefiler said:
I have same mobo and CMX6GX3M3C1600C7 (same ram) now, still could not set it to 1600 factory settings. Enabling XPM, system crashes -> blue screen. Let me know if you have some suggestions. (CPU = 920 stock)


Check your Ram listing in QVL datasheet. It may not be supported!!!
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
June 17, 2010 4:50:46 PM

From Memory - more than you wanted to know!, Part III - "Evaluation and selection":

The difference between "Supported Speed", and "Supported Speed"!

The board makers say "DDR3-XXXX Supported!!", meaning the circuitry on the board can be coaxed, one way or another, eventually, into making at least one piece of someone's XXXX speed memory function. They know that less than 1% of their customers have even a vague idea of what's actually involved, but more than 90% will be mightily impressed by 'BIG NUMBERS'! They simply can't pass by the marketing advantage to those big numbers...

Then, there is the processor. Intel plainly states: DDR3-800, DDR3-1066, and, on some processors, DDR3-1333 are supported - and that's IT! I have pointed this out more than once:

From:
"Intel® Core™ i7 Processor Extreme Edition and Intel® Core™ i7 Processor Datasheet, Volume 2"
Quote:
2.14 Integrated Memory Controller Miscellaneous Registers

2.14.1 MC_DIMM_CLK_RATIO_STATUS This register contains status information about DIMM clock ratio
Device:3 Function:4 Offset:50h Access as Dword
Bit 28:24 MAX_RATIO. Maximum ratio allowed by the part.
Value = Qclk
00000 = RSVD
00110 = 800MHz
01000 = 1066MHz
01010 = 1333MHz

Bit 4:0
QCLK_RATIO. Current ratio of Qclk
Value = Qclk.
00000 = RSVD
00110 = 800MHz
01000 = 1066MHz
01010 = 1333MHz

2.14.2 MC_DIMM_CLK_RATIO This register is Requested DIMM clock ratio (Qclk), the data rate going to the DIMM. The clock sent to the DIMM is 1/2 of QCLK rate
Device:3 Function:4 Offset:54h Access as Dword
QCLK_RATIO. Requested ratio of Qclk/Bclk.
00000 = RSVD
00110 = 800MHz
01000 = 1066MHz
01010 = 1333MHz

As Porky Pig used to say, at the end of every cartoon, "Th-Th-Th-!" Everything else falls under the broad label of 'undocumented' - like fifteenth century maps marked "here be dragons!" I'm not saying it can't work; it obviously does work, sometimes... Somehow, the BIOS and the board hardware are being manipulated to 'fool' the CPU into clocking the memory faster than spec - but it's one of those "pay no attention to that little man behind the curtain" things... AND: If you 'rob Peter to pay Paul' long enough, you wind up with a sore peter! :lol: 

Regarding "Intel Supported", there are major advantages to staying within these specifications. The i3/i5/i7 have 'moved' the memory controller onto the processor die. One of the reasons (among many) for the existence of the above mentioned memory configuration registers, is that the memory controller contains 'training' functions: much like the process of the BIOS 'waking up' the machine, and 'discovering' or 'polling' what devices are available, and how are they 'hooked up', the memory controller turns on, looks at its memory configuration registers, and attempts to 'hook up' to the physically attached RAM. The first thing it must do is determine the actual layout of the memory - the 'organization' by rows, columns, ranks, and sides that we discussed in section I. Then, it will attempt to 'adjust its ciruitry' to the physical characteristics of the RAM itself. It needs to 'measure' the impedance characteristics of the on-DIMM RAM controller chip, and the attached DRAM itself; in other words, the combined effects of resistance and capacitance (as well as any 'stray' inductance - a bad thing!) [from section I, again...], that will affect its physical transactions/speed...

As the CPU has not got access to a multimeter, oscilloscope, or logic analyzer, it can only do this 'measuring' by 'looking at' two domains: voltage, and time. It sends a 'pulse' or command from here, and watches there, for a return; it says "Ah-ha! It took so long, to reach such voltage - I must adjust myself' thusly!" And, hopefully, your memory channels are as 'tuned' as they're going to get...

Now, Intel specifies everything, and guarantees nothing! If your memory is constructed exactly to JEDEC spec, and the 'physical hookup' is done correctly, and the planets are in the proper alignment, 'training' will work... In numerous places, Intel's documents contain the 'electronic engineering equivalent' of "your mileage may vary!" This is where your "sore peter" comes in - if you're ridiculously outside Intel's physical specs (and, let's face it - 2166 memory is twice the 1066 supported by all i3/i5/i7 CPUs, meaning it requires the memory controller to perform its functions in half the time - which, patently, falls into the 'realm of the ridiculous'), you sacrifice any benefit of these 'built-in' accommodations!

I consider myself a fair-to-middlin' amateur philosopher; and the great cognitive philosopher Daniel Dennet has written "one of the proper jobs of philosophers is definition mongering" - you can plainly see here that one person's definition of 'supported' (the board maker's and memory manufacturer's) varies wildly from another's (the processor manufacturer's)!!


The 'Memory Support List', and how to use it:

The support list is done when the board design is finalized to production, and almost never updated thereafter. When this is done, somebody with some degree of engineering talent, and knowledge of the hardware involved, sits down with a collection of RAM they have 'lying about', mostly samples provided by manufacturers who have a vested interest in getting their products on the list. He tosses aside the candidates he knows won't work, for one reason or another, on that particular platform, and goes to work setting up and testing the remainder. If he can get it working - it goes on the list; if not, not! I imagine he stays at it until he reaches some arbitrary number, or until his boss says "you got other, important work to do - GIT!"

This leaves a large number of issues for the user:

Being 'on the list' does not guarantee 'instant' compatibility for your use; the list provides no detail regarding "did it just come up and run with a 'Load Optimized?'', "did he have to enable XMP and it worked?", or, "did he (with 'inside' knowledge of the MOBO and BIOS) have to 'diddle around' a half-hour to set it up?"

Not being on the list certainly does not imply it won't work! I have built a little Excel 'tool' for evalution and comparison of RAM; I went to update its contents just to reflect what's available in 2G x 3Channel from NewEgg, and, if memory serves me, wound up with eighty-some odd part numbers! Considering the ungodly amount of MOBOs made, this would require a full-time staff of ten, even assuming the samples were consistently available - else another ten could work all day every day 'hunting down' samples! Your RAM part's absence may simply reflect that it was released after the board...

Many parts you'll see on the list are from unfamiliar makers - they may be available in every quick-service gas-station in Taiwan, but simply aren't available in your market...

The main advantage I see in 'sticking with' items on the memory supported list is just that - the position it puts you in, vis-a-vis support! If your memory can pass MemTesting a single stick at a time, and it is on the QVL, you have support pretty much 'over a barrel' - they have to help get the stuff running - they're the ones who said it would!

In any other situation, you're pretty much trapped in what, unfortunately, has become an industry 'standard operating procedure' of 'passing the blame' - kind of like the Scarecrow in the Wizard of Oz crossing his arms across his chest, pointing in both directions, and saying "They usually go thataway!" The memory manufacturer says: "well, it must be your board, because that memory works at rated speed on 'ABC' board"; the board manufacturer says: "it must be your memory, because 'DEF' memory works on our board at that speed"; the CPU maker says: "it's your problem, because our CPU is rated to run RAM at 'GHI' speeds"; the software guys say: "it's obviously a hardware problem, because it works on 'UVW' platform; the hardware guys say: "it's obviously a software problem, because 'XYZ' program, which does the same thing, runs fine on our platform"; meanwhile, you are 'stuck in the middle', saying "'%$#&' these people, why can't somebody tell me how to make it work?!?"
July 13, 2010 5:04:15 AM

Hi there! Its no exactly what this thread is about but I wanna buy a GA-X58A-UD3R also. And I want to buy a G.Skill 2200 memory4GB (2 x 2GB) PIS - F3-17600CL7D-4GBPIS. Since I read so many people are having problem with their RAM memory compatibility with UD3R I was wondering if that one is going to work.
I just read at the link bilbat posted (about memory support list) and I could find G.Skill F3-17600CL8D-4GBTD which is quite similar to the one I wanna buy, but not exactly the same. So, do you guys recommend me to buy this set of RAM and mobo or is it risky?
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
July 13, 2010 2:14:55 PM

Best advice I can offer is - read this: Part III - "Evaluation and selection". Would not hurt to read all four parts - then you'll know exactly what you're ordering, paying for, and what to expect... To quote the 'Lead-in' at Memory - more than you wanted to know!:


Since the advent, and common use of DDR3 memory, with its huge variety of available frequencies and latencies, memory selection and use has become an on-going nightmare for many. One thing repetitive questions have made apparent is that the more you've paid for your RAM - the le$$ likely you are to be able to get it to work acceptably! This is unfortunate - and unnecessary! I have thought, for some time (pretty much since the first i7 problems started cropping up), to try to put together a comprehensive guide to making an informed decision about buying RAM - and then, being able to actually get it working!! :sol: 
July 14, 2010 7:02:00 AM

Well Ive bought the board and the 930 but not yet the RAM however I do plan on clocking the processor. So my question is that it seems you need to clock the RAM to get the processor speed higher. So wouldnt it seem better to get 1600mhz in the first place instead of getting 1333 and clocking that which would just create more heat. If the ram is already designed to run at 1600 then your not going to have high temps on the RAM?

Im new to over clocking if that makes no sense. Just Overclockers bundle comes as 930, this board and corsair 1600 so Id of assumed this the best set up for over clocking as you dont really need to take the 1600 above its supported speed while 1333 would be taken above recomended speed? Is that correct?

Dean.
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
July 14, 2010 6:38:15 PM

Memory may run somewhat above its 'rated' speed - but usually not much - not enough so you can count on it. DDR3 memory has three 'standard rated' speeds: DDR3-800, DDR3-1066, and for some memory, DDR3-1333. In the DIMMs (dual inline memory module), there is a little 'stored table' (think of it as a little Excel table) that contains all the memory settings (not just the CAS-tRCD-tRP-tRAS timings that are usually quoted in ads) required for the board, CPU, and BIOS to automatically set up for those three speeds. Anything higher is considered 'overclocked'. Some (most?) faster memory contains an additional entry (and sometimes, two extra entries...) to the table, this time referred to as the XMP. The BIOS has a seperate function to enable this XMP speed, but, the drawback is that, once XMP is enabled, you are effectively 'locked out' of all the other board/BIOS overclocking adjustments...

Every Intel chip will overclock an easy 20% (which would take your 2.8GHz i7-930 to roughly 3.4GHz) with minor adjustments and any aftermarket CPU cooler - most will also do a 50% increase (to 4.2GHz) with a 'little fiddling' - but, XMP must be disabled to make these adjustments - so, to get fast RAM, and fast CPU requires making BIOS settings 'by hand'! It is, however, no big deal - I can likely 'walk you through it' in less than a half-hour's work on your part...
July 16, 2010 9:08:48 AM

bilbat said:
Best advice I can offer is - read this: Part III - "Evaluation and selection". Would not hurt to read all four parts - then you'll know exactly what you're ordering, paying for, and what to expect... To quote the 'Lead-in' at Memory - more than you wanted to know!:


Since the advent, and common use of DDR3 memory, with its huge variety of available frequencies and latencies, memory selection and use has become an on-going nightmare for many. One thing repetitive questions have made apparent is that the more you've paid for your RAM - the le$$ likely you are to be able to get it to work acceptably! This is unfortunate - and unnecessary! I have thought, for some time (pretty much since the first i7 problems started cropping up), to try to put together a comprehensive guide to making an informed decision about buying RAM - and then, being able to actually get it working!! :sol: 


Thank you very much for you reply!
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
July 16, 2010 2:36:35 PM

Always !

If you'd like to take a look at an 'overclock', I just posted one here: Best RAM for OverClock GA-P55-UD6 with i750 CPU yesterday; if you'd like to see an 'X58A' one, keep an eye on this post: Gigabyte EasyTune6 shows different values for memory slots, I'm hoping to put up an OC sometime today, assuming Murphy's law regarding 'any given job expanding to consume all available time and resources' doesn't 'bite me' again today!
a c 346 } Memory
a c 715 V Motherboard
July 16, 2010 7:06:16 PM

Lots of info all over the place. All I can state is that XMP Corsair will either give you BSOD or simply fail to post. I don't know about G-Skill. The ONLY reason to get 1600 MHz memory is if you are going to OC your system. The examples above all are for a "Locked CPU" and raising your BLCK; e.g. 160 x 10 = 1600 MHz, normally it's 133.33 x 8 = 1066 MHz and if you leave the Memory alone (OC example) 160 x 8 = 1280.

As far as justification, I am interested in the CAS speed more than 1600 vs 1800 etc and the HEAT if OC. I promise if you set memory above "stock" and if XMP failed you will turn-on the MOBO "indicator" like a Xmas Tree.

As a footnote: Memory is important but the Biggest Oversight is your HDD. it is byfar the SLOWEST component on your PC. For most users the best configuration is 3 x 2GB DDR3 with an SSD; the 128 GB are getting "affordable" and when used with a 1 TB or larger HDD give you a new level of experience, far beyond what OC alone can hope to obtain.
a b } Memory
a c 177 V Motherboard
July 17, 2010 4:50:29 PM

The relative value of 'speed vs latency' is thoroughly discussed in Part II - "What memory does", as well as the circumstances in which speed will give you better results than low latency (not many!)

If XMP is not working - the XMP is wrong! I have seen no evidence, since the advent of main-stream DDR3, that any manufacturer is more prone to problems here than any other... There are three things to be aware of:

1 - XMP is optimized for a single DIMM per channel; i.e., two DIMMs on an 1156 system, three on a 1366; if you are running more, XMP will likely not work! These setups require 'hand adjustment' - typically a slight bump in Vdimm, a bigger bump in QPI/Vtt, a 2N command rate, and about a ten to fifteen percent bump in tRFC...

2 - if there's anything that XMP pretty consistently 'gets wrong', it's too low a QPI/Vtt for the Vdimm...

3 - XMP (at least on GB boards - the only ones I 'diddle with', XMP 'locks out' all other major OCing adjustments - so the best thing to do is: enable XMP; write down ALL the memory timings; disable XMP; make the settings manually - this leaves your BIOS 'free' to make the myriad other tweaks you will want to...

a c 346 } Memory
a c 715 V Motherboard
July 17, 2010 6:28:25 PM

While I appreciate that simple Apps <or> short-term tasks won't see much performance differences in lower CAS latency, conversely "Intense" Apps AND "Large/Long" Processes most certainly do. Similarly, most Apps can only benefit from 1 or 2 cores while seeing absolutely no benefits from 4 or 6+ core CPUs.

@zalittle asked the question "My question is, Will the board support 1600 MHZ memory for overclocking or do I need purchase 2200 MHz memory..." The ANSWER IS YES. {Round Down (1600 / BLCK) = Memory Multiplier, then Manually set your Timings (e.g. 9-9-9-24), and your Voltages - USE SPECS for Timing & Voltages!!!

However, "some" other MOBOs DO NOT require the fuss of BIOS OC/Setting your memory at 1600 MHz. I personally have the GA-X58A-UD3R (rev. 2), and find its behavior very annoying with my 1600 MHz Corsair Dominator DDR3 RAM and poor support of XMP. I am assuming setting any 1600 MHz memory will have the same results of "lighting-up your MOBO warning indicators" even with properly configured "fast" memory. I precisely configured the BIOS using BLCK 160 X 10 Memory (9-9-9-24) and still get all of the memory MOBO warning lights on.

"IF" you have large tasks as I do, processing taking hours (encoding/databases/etc); our 5-hour database now takes 1.5-hours, and the memory changes 1066 verses 1600 cuts-off an additional 10 minutes. Most of the 3.5 hours is attributed to #1 SSD and #2 CPU. And in my gaming rig, 2-5 FPS from memory alone, and the SSD eliminated most of the stutter caused by HDD.

Tom's - http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ddr3-1333-speed-lat...
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