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SSD with best transfer results for 4kb to 8kb Random access level ?

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June 14, 2011 4:19:34 AM

I read the Article "The SSD Manufactures Bluff", and would like to know what SATA 2 SSD has the best transfer results at the 4kb to 8kb Random Access Level ?

I would also like to know what SATA 3 SSD has the best transfer results at the 4kb to 8kb Random Access Level ?


The article did not mention drives other than Crucial C-300
June 14, 2011 5:03:11 AM

sdep777 said:
I read the Article "The SSD Manufactures Bluff", and would like to know what SATA 2 SSD has the best transfer results at the 4kb to 8kb Random Access Level ?

I would also like to know what SATA 3 SSD has the best transfer results at the 4kb to 8kb Random Access Level ?


The article did not mention drives other than Crucial C-300



This is from the article


SOLID STATE DRIVE ….FACTS....


Top 5 Most Frequent Drive Accesses by Type and Percentage:
.
-8K Read (7.60%)
-8K Write (56.35%)
-1K Write (6.10%)
-16 Write (5.79%)
-64K Read (2.49%)
Top 5 account for: 78.33% of total drive access over test period
Largest access size in top 50: 256K Read (0.44% of total)


In the end, it confirms something we always thought but just didn’t really understand.  Large sequential read and write access is utilized by the average user less than 1% of the time yet the most used method of access is smaller random write access as shown by the 8k write at over 50%.
Manufacturers showcase the disk access method that is actually used the least (0.44% total) in order to get you to buy their SSDs.


In other words, the 4-8 kb random write access is the single most crucial access that results in better visible ssd performance. simply find the ssd with the best transfer results at the 4-8 kb random access level.
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a c 303 G Storage
June 14, 2011 2:04:32 PM

What do you mean when you use the phrase "transfer results"? Are you referring to transfering data to and from a solid state drive via data links such as SATA, USB, and PCI-e or do you mean something different?
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June 14, 2011 3:54:26 PM

Results from like an ATTO test to see what SSD has the fastest transfer rate at 4kb to 8kb
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a c 143 G Storage
June 14, 2011 4:10:18 PM

Here is the complete article... http://thessdreview.com/ssd-guides/buyers-guide/the-ssd...

I would caution on using ATTO to determine your choice to purchase a SSD. It utilizes compressed files for testing, which SSD's like OCZ Vertex 2 / 3 excel out. They don't excel so much at uncompressed data. You are better served using CrystalDiskMark or AS SSD Benchmark. Another good tool is PCMark 7, which is updated over PCMark Vantage to take into account SSD performance & Windows 7.
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a c 303 G Storage
June 14, 2011 4:40:18 PM

OK! You are not interested in data transfer rates to and from the ssd which are restricted due to SATA, USB, PCIe, motherboard, and/or chipset configurations.

Instead you are interested in ATTO benchmarks that measure raw sequential transfer speeds for both read and write access at smaller transfer sizes. ATTO is what manufacturers usually use because it makes their ssd's look good. The problem with ATTO is it uses raw data instead of random or mixed data. The random and mixed benchmarks are much more realistice. However, manufacturers will not show the random and mixed benchmark results because performance is lower.

more to follow......


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June 14, 2011 4:55:17 PM

I read this article "The SSD Manufacturers Bluff" (MaximumPC) and this is from the article:


SOLID STATE DRIVE ….FACTS....


Top 5 Most Frequent Drive Accesses by Type and Percentage:
.
-8K Read (7.60%)
-8K Write (56.35%)
-1K Write (6.10%)
-16 Write (5.79%)
-64K Read (2.49%)
Top 5 account for: 78.33% of total drive access over test period
Largest access size in top 50: 256K Read (0.44% of total)

Using Microsofts Diskmon, he simply monitored his typical computer usage in doing things such as using the internet, running applications, playing music etc.  In short, he did his best to recreate the computer use of a typical user and then used the program to break down the percentage that specific disk access speeds were being utilized.

In the end, it confirms something we always thought but just didn’t really understand.  Large sequential read and write access is utilized by the average user less than 1% of the time yet the most used method of access is smaller random write access as shown by the 8k write at over 50%.
Manufacturers showcase the disk access method that is actually used the least (0.44% total) in order to get you to buy their SSDs.

In other words, the 4-8 kb random write access is the single most crucial access that results in better visible ssd performance. simply find the ssd with the best transfer results at the 4-8 kb random access level.


All I am trying to find out is what drives fall into this category
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a c 143 G Storage
June 14, 2011 5:19:42 PM

Quote:
Actually I think you meant ATTO uses uncompressed files (or compressible files) for testing. They are highly compressible (all zeros).

Thank you... I have a tendency to get compressed and compressible mixed up when in my head... :pt1cable: 
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a c 303 G Storage
June 14, 2011 6:03:33 PM

There is a group of large capacity 240GB SATA III solid state drives using the new SandForce SF-2281 Controller capable of balanced 500MB/s read and write transfer speeds and 60,000 IOPS at 4k aligned:

OCZ Vertex 3
OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS
OCZ Agility 3
OWC Mercury Extreme Pro (updated)
Crucial m4

I did not include the new Corsair Force 3 due to a factory recall. In addition, I do not have a warm fuzzy feeling about the new SandForce controllers. SandForce is experiencing a few issues that will require firmware updates.

I just updated my ssd database yesterday evening. The database includes links to all the technical reviews for the models I mentioned. Feel free to use it to get to the technical reviews:

http://johnnylucky.org/data-storage/ssd-database.html

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June 14, 2011 6:16:39 PM

Is this what I should be looking for drives with 60,000 IOPS at 4k , but NOT with a SandForce controller ?


I would prefer SSD with 60gb capacity as I want to Raid them, 2 for sure.
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a c 303 G Storage
June 14, 2011 7:30:43 PM

The OCZ Vertex 3 seems to be the ssd of choice among the 60 or so web sites that do technical reviews. OCZ was first to market so initially there wasn't much in the way of competition. Things have changed. I didn't mean to alarm you. The SandForce controllers in the ssd's are very good. However, as with any brand new product, something can go wrong. Usually it is just a matter of creating a firmware update to address any issues.

When you reduce capacity from 240Gb to 60Gb the reduction is usually accompanied by a reduction in performance. In all probability you will not notice the performance reduction.

What will you be doing that requires multiple ssd's in a RAID array?
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June 14, 2011 9:15:14 PM

Mostly Research , Excel , Programs, I go to about 150 + sites per day doing Research and I want to do raid 0 to have a little fun and see what the performance increase is like over a single drive.
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a c 303 G Storage
June 15, 2011 12:14:33 AM

OK! Experimenting can be a lot of fun. Unless you are going to be compiling databases you will probably not see a difference in performance.

Just remember when visiting 150+ web sites per day you are totally at the mercy of Internet Service Providers A solid state drive will not improve web surfing.

Have you read the Summer 2011 ssd roundup over at AnandTech? Here is a link to the review:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/4421/the-2011-midrange-ss...
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June 18, 2011 1:41:50 AM

Best answer selected by sdep777.
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