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Configuring a Desktop on a WiFi network runing Vista 64 Bit

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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February 2, 2010 3:15:28 PM

I recently purchased a closeout deal- Quad Core, 8GB machine which I plan to use for audio recording and video editing. The problem is that it is running Windows Vista Home Premium 64bit. The PC is located in a room that does not have access to a router or cat-5 cables. It does have a Wifi signal from the Wireless G router I use. I've tried the following options with no success at all...

WiFi PCI card. Vista recognizes the hardware but can't find an available network. even neighbors.
USB Wifi Antenna... Vista recognizes the hardware but find an available network. even neighbors.
Linksys Wireless Access point-Cat 4 running to the NIC card. Configured with existing Wifi Router. Again... can't find any available network signals...

So the fix at this point is to get rid of Vista... the question is to roll back to XP or upgrade to Windows 7? If I roll back to XP Pro I have a familar environment... plenty of available drivers, compatibility with all the hardware and software I plan to use... though I lose 5 GB of desktop memory.

If I move to Windows 7... I get a beautiful interface... but I'm worried about driver issues and continued networking problems.

Any suggestions on which way to go?
February 17, 2010 2:22:36 AM

I'm not sure what your wireless problems are on that Vista machine. After all, we KNOW there are plenty of ppl using wireless w/ Vista 64 bit. So it's really just a matter of finding a compatible wireless USB/PCI adapter. And I'd be shocked if MS didn't provide such a compatibility list.

But let's put that aside for the moment and just pretend NOTHING is compatible.

What I recommend to ppl using desktops, workstations, consumer appliances, basically any device that's either going to remain fixed OR is a closed system (e.g., TiVo) is use a wireless Ethernet bridge!

[wireless router]<--wireless-->[wireless Ethernet bridge]<--wire-->[wired device]

This COMPLETELY ELIMINATES all wireless driver/OS compatibility issues because all the wireless stuff is pushed out to the bridge itself. As far as the wired device is concerned, it connected via wire (and will appear as such in Windows, Linux, or whatever OS you use). In fact, if you use a bridge, you won't even have problems w/ any new versions of Windows in the years to come either since every version is going to minimally support wire.

It will typically cost more and be a wee bit more complex to configure (but it's not rocket science either), but it's such a flexible and powerful device that I find it worth the money. Many also support other features, such as wireless repeating. And they tend to have a stronger wireless signal than a wireless PCI/USB adapter. And your positioning is only limited by the length of Ethernet cable between the bridge and the wired device (up to 100m max).

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