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New built computer turned on once..then died.

Last response: in Systems
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August 26, 2009 6:59:24 AM

Spec :

i7 920
EVGA X58 SLi SL
EVGA gtx 275 superclocked
OCZ Gold 3 gig
WD Black 750 gb
samsung 22x dvd burner
cool master 690 case
corsair 750TX 750W

Alright so when I first turn on my computer on nothing came up but the LED light on the mobo so I restarted and try again. The second time the mobo booted up and everything worked fine until I got the "disk boot failure insert system disk and press enter" so I turned off my computer and unplugged the HDD then replug it hoping it would fix the problem. After plugging it in and making sure everything is good to go I turned it on again and it won't even boot up..expect the fan, which spin for one second then automatically shuts off again.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks =).
a b B Homebuilt system
August 26, 2009 1:18:09 PM

sounds like an electrical short, but there's a lot of possibilities. Did you try the booting up troubleshooting guide that's a sticky post on here?
a b B Homebuilt system
August 26, 2009 2:00:16 PM

Electrical short is a good thing to look for here. If I understand your post, the timing may be important for another possibility. MAYBE this happened: the first failed boot was only a few seconds on, then off for a while. The second boot got you to the disk failure prompt, then it was turned off, but total "On Time" was only a few seconds also. More off time until the third boot. This time the system ran (according to fan operation) for only 1 or 2 seconds, then shut itself off.

That MAY be because your CPU cooling system is not working. With poor cooling the CPU will overheat in 5 to 10 seconds and shut off the entire system to protect itself. So if the run times involved were less than that each time, it is possible you were heating the CPU up a little on the first two tries, then hit the limit on the third try.

Poor CPU cooling can come about three ways. The obvious one is the CPU fan does not work, but you'd see that right away. The next likely is the mounting of the CPU cooler is not right and it is making poor contact with the CPU itself. This can happen if the cooler mounting hardware and brackets are loose or the cooler is crooked in its mount so it touches the CPU on an angle instead of flat on. The third possibility is you did the thermal contact paste wrong. There MUST be a thin layer of thermal paste between the CPU and the cooler. Too little and it does not cover the entire CPU surface for inadequate heat flow. Too much and the paste layer is so thick it slows down the heat flow. If you suspect poor heatsink mounting or poor thermal paste application, remove the heatsink carefully from the CPU, clean off the paste and check the mounting hardware to be sure it will achieve uniform secure contact. Then read carefully and follow the instructions for the thermal paste use (Arctic Silver has good instructions on their website) to re-apply it and put the heatsink back on, fastening down securely.
Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
August 26, 2009 2:44:53 PM

yeah, those are good points. I remember helping out some people doing first time builds and came across some silly stuff. One time I saw that the build was all correct, except the heatsink brackets weren't locked down. Another guy who couldn't get his computer to start, I looked at his system and saw that he did engage the heatsink brackets, but never opened the ZIF socket, and then lock the CPU pins... he just smashed it all down. Fortunately, only 4 pins were bent out of shape despite that abuse, and after some careful work with needlenose pliers, I got it into the socket. I was surprised it actually booted just fine after that.
August 26, 2009 6:43:11 PM

Paperdoc said:
Electrical short is a good thing to look for here. If I understand your post, the timing may be important for another possibility. MAYBE this happened: the first failed boot was only a few seconds on, then off for a while. The second boot got you to the disk failure prompt, then it was turned off, but total "On Time" was only a few seconds also. More off time until the third boot. This time the system ran (according to fan operation) for only 1 or 2 seconds, then shut itself off.

That MAY be because your CPU cooling system is not working. With poor cooling the CPU will overheat in 5 to 10 seconds and shut off the entire system to protect itself. So if the run times involved were less than that each time, it is possible you were heating the CPU up a little on the first two tries, then hit the limit on the third try.

Poor CPU cooling can come about three ways. The obvious one is the CPU fan does not work, but you'd see that right away. The next likely is the mounting of the CPU cooler is not right and it is making poor contact with the CPU itself. This can happen if the cooler mounting hardware and brackets are loose or the cooler is crooked in its mount so it touches the CPU on an angle instead of flat on. The third possibility is you did the thermal contact paste wrong. There MUST be a thin layer of thermal paste between the CPU and the cooler. Too little and it does not cover the entire CPU surface for inadequate heat flow. Too much and the paste layer is so thick it slows down the heat flow. If you suspect poor heatsink mounting or poor thermal paste application, remove the heatsink carefully from the CPU, clean off the paste and check the mounting hardware to be sure it will achieve uniform secure contact. Then read carefully and follow the instructions for the thermal paste use (Arctic Silver has good instructions on their website) to re-apply it and put the heatsink back on, fastening down securely.

Thanks for the input, ill try remounting the CPU fan..if that doesn't work I might as well rebuild everything.

Oh and it doesn't seem like I got a thermal paste with the build so I guess I'll have to order one?
a b B Homebuilt system
August 26, 2009 6:48:13 PM

Did you use the stock cooler for the i7 920? If so, it already has thermal paste applied to the bottom of the heatsink. It's gray and comes in three strips. A lot of people seem to have problems installing the stock Intel heat sinks. Just be sure to read the instructions. It's also easier to mount the heat sink with the motherboard outside the case so you can ensure all four push-pins are fully seated.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 26, 2009 6:56:48 PM

shortstuff_mt is right on! Some cooler systems don't supply a separate heatsink paste in a tube, but put it on the heatsink for you. I have not worked with these, so read the instructions carefully. I am not sure, but MAYBE there is a plastic film cover that has to be removed before the heatsink is installed on the CPU? If there is no thin layer of paste with your heatsink - just bare semi-shiny metal on the bottom - look again for a tiny tube of goo and the instructions on how to use. If you're not using the stock cooler system and bought a third-party one, those almost always include a tiny tube of thermal paste.
August 26, 2009 7:14:41 PM

shortstuff_mt said:
Did you use the stock cooler for the i7 920? If so, it already has thermal paste applied to the bottom of the heatsink. It's gray and comes in three strips. A lot of people seem to have problems installing the stock Intel heat sinks. Just be sure to read the instructions. It's also easier to mount the heat sink with the motherboard outside the case so you can ensure all four push-pins are fully seated.
Oh right, forgot about that. And installing the stock intel heat sink is a pain in the ass...I think I am going to get a aftermarket cooler if I still couldn't get it to work.

Edit : There's a sticker on top of the stock fan, am I suppose to remove that?
August 26, 2009 9:09:31 PM

Rebuilt everything, checked everything. Still same problem..;/ any help?
a b B Homebuilt system
August 26, 2009 9:14:42 PM

Did you try running the system with the motheboard outside the case on a non-conductive surface (breadboarding) as suggested by jsc? That would help you eliminate a short as the problem.
August 26, 2009 9:23:23 PM

Nope, I guess i'll try that now.
August 26, 2009 10:12:40 PM

Alright, I breadboarded it and everything worked fine!

So should I install OS now or put it back in the case?

Oh and thanks alot jsc&mt :D .
edit : tried installin os but got disk boot failure insert system disk and press enterdisk boot failure insert system disk and press enter
a b B Homebuilt system
August 26, 2009 10:28:40 PM

Your computer is trying to boot from the HD. You need to set the CD/DVD drive as the first boot device in the BIOS in order to install the OS.

You also need to figure out what was shorting out the motherboard. You probably have an extra standoff installed or something. Remove any standoffs in the case that don't line up with a hole in the motherboard.
August 26, 2009 10:31:29 PM

I just tried CD/DVD as first boot device and it still didn't detect my Windows7 64 bit disc or Windows XP 32 bit disc...

And I assume the problem is the cool master 690's wire..cause I plugged in all the USB driver wire from the case..maybe that's the cause?
a b B Homebuilt system
August 26, 2009 10:38:05 PM

Is your CD/DVD drive detected correctly in the BIOS? You should be able to select it by name as the first boot device.
August 26, 2009 10:39:08 PM

Umm weird, it just shows up as CD rom in the bios..let me recheck it.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 26, 2009 10:45:01 PM

It may not show up by name in the boot priority list, but it should show correctly when it goes through the boot process. Make sure to scroll down all the way in the list of possible boot devices in the boot priority list. Your drive may be toward the bottom and not show until you scroll down.
August 26, 2009 10:49:27 PM

Alright I fixied it by plugging in the sata driver which I forgot to plug in.

Anyways, thanks for the help. =)
a b B Homebuilt system
August 27, 2009 12:41:34 PM

always double check your cabling... it can save you a whole lot of time.
!