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Ordered the Parts and need assistance for First Time Building!

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August 28, 2009 2:37:50 AM

Hello everyone!

I am seventeen years old so bear with me. I am very inexperienced in building a computer but my uncle says it is pretty much straight-forward and common sense.

I read online that you should ground yourself by touching the chassis or using an anti-static wrist strap. Now, I never knew that and before, for fun, touched inside parts of a computer (on a carpet too >_<). Maybe that's why the fan seems to blast off in the computer and that the computer sometimes acts very slow (luckily the computer is 5 years old and I searched around about a year ago).

So I have a clear space, a basement with some sort of flexible rubber tiles, and a humidifier. But! I read online that a painted surface would not work to ground yourself. My new computer case is all black, painted inside with the exception of screws. My PSU can be turned off if plugged in as a side note.

I have an anti-static wrist strap. But cannot use my computer case since it is painted. What do I do?

-Ben
August 28, 2009 2:58:32 AM

Oh and my outlet is grounded.
August 28, 2009 3:21:10 AM

Putting the strap on the back of a screw in the hard drive cage will be fine. They don't paint the inside of the holes and it will all ground. The plug in the wall doesn't work anymore as current mobos draw power as soon as there is a power source connected.

Can somone confirm this, if the OP puts the static strap on the grounding pole of the PSU cord, all static potental will equalize, correct?
Related resources
August 28, 2009 3:26:11 AM

I see, so this would be a problem for me. I'll give you more details of the computer:
LIAN LI Lancool PC-K62 Black
Asrock x58 Extreme Motherboard
CORSAIR CMPSU-750HX 750W ATX12V 2.3
August 28, 2009 3:40:55 AM

My hard drive cage is also painted black... even if use the screw would it not work? Unless the hard drive cage is actually embedded into the case, right?
August 28, 2009 3:47:23 AM

Putting the strap on the back of a screw in the hard drive cage will be fine. They don't paint the inside of the holes and it will all ground.

+1 this should work well

August 28, 2009 3:57:44 AM

Okay so to make it clear (I'm just being a bit paranoid and sure at the moment). I leave the PSU unplugged if I need to install it first, and I attach the crocodile jaws onto the back of the screw of the hard drive cage.
August 28, 2009 4:29:13 AM

Yup that will work. I dont plug the cord into the PSU to the end when i am set to power up for the first time.

August 28, 2009 4:29:18 AM

Most PSU's have an unpainted fan grill, possibly chromed. If so, use that. With your PSU installed, power cord connected but PSU turned off if the building gnd is any good you should have adequate gnd.
August 28, 2009 7:14:06 AM

croc said:
Most PSU's have an unpainted fan grill, possibly chromed. If so, use that. With your PSU installed, power cord connected but PSU turned off if the building gnd is any good you should have adequate gnd.


So you can build a PC with the PSU unplugged or plugged in, but turned off? What's the difference?
August 28, 2009 7:18:48 AM

or just go the easy way out and get an anti static mat?
August 28, 2009 7:35:17 AM

VinnyChase said:
So you can build a PC with the PSU unplugged or plugged in, but turned off? What's the difference?


With the PSU turned off, but plugged in, you still have a building gnd. That third wire is not switched in any way, and the PSU is providing the case a path to bldg gnd.

Look, it is up to the individual. Personally, I build workstations. I build them for professionals. I hate failures. My clients hate failures. So I go to extremes when building up systems for clients. For friends, neighbours and such, I mostly just make sure that the PSU is plugged in to a good gnd before I open the case. And I wear a wrist strap....
August 28, 2009 8:15:33 AM

whats the big fuss with PSU's, they're supposed to be taking in electricity anyway...
August 28, 2009 10:22:58 AM

DO NOT PLUG IN THE SYSTEM. Current PSU do supply power even when off to the mobo. If you're board has an LED light on it, its lit even when the system is off. Couldn't find the post, but I think its coming in on the 5v rail.
August 28, 2009 11:13:53 AM

skora said:
DO NOT PLUG IN THE SYSTEM. Current PSU do supply power even when off to the mobo. If you're board has an LED light on it, its lit even when the system is off. Couldn't find the post, but I think its coming in on the 5v rail.

No. It comes in on the 5 volt standby line. That is always on when the PSU is plugged into the wall and the switch on the back of the PSU is turned on. So croc is right - PSU plugged in but turned off, you have a building ground.

hobbes, you say you are an inexperienced builder. (We all had a first build at some time or another.) The link below is to a "My new computer won't boot" thread. The first part of that thread contains a checklist that may help you from making common mistakes that many people make. I suggest that you take a look at it.
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/page-261145_13_0.ht...
----------
Building computers since 1977.
August 28, 2009 5:33:19 PM

Thank you for the assist guys. So to make it clear once again. I install the PSU, I plug in the PSU, I turn off the PSU and then I put my crocodile teeth onto the PSU.

But in no way I should plug the PSU to the Motherboard?
August 29, 2009 1:30:11 AM

A building ground does absolutely nothing to reduce the risk of static discharge. The electrical potential is between the components and the builder. Once that potential has been equalized and the builder and parts are bonded, there's no risk of static spark.

Illustration:
The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) is the authority for procedures on fueling aircraft including the ones that cost $200+ million dollars. They take great care in testing and the writing of code and procedures because of how much is at stake and the risk to human life. Back in the day, it was required to equalize a fuel truck to a grounding point (copper post in the ramp, I have many in my ramp) and then to the aircraft. With all the testing they've done, they revised their rules and no longer require the fuels trucks to ground before connecting to an aircraft. Its been like this for a while now. All thats required is the fuel truck to bond to the aircraft.

Point:
The NFPA has a lot more at stake than you do building your computer. Since there is no benefit to ground, don't do it. Just equalize the electrical potential by bonding with the wrist strap.

The problem with plugging in the PSU and not into the mobo is it can become difficult make that connection after everything else is plugged in. Put as much as you can on the mobo out of the case. Put the mobo in the case without the PSU being plugged in and install the rest of your gear including the power plugs for the mobo.

Though the risk is EXTREMELY low, if you have any power, stand-by included, running to your board, a dropped screwdriver, bracket, screw, could potentially make a connection to the power line and short something out.

If you still need a place to put the alligator clip, you can use the grounding post on the back of the PSU or plug the cord into the PSU and not the wall, and then bond to the grounding post on the PSU cord.
August 29, 2009 1:43:05 AM

skora said:
A building ground does absolutely nothing to reduce the risk of static discharge. The electrical potential is between the components and the builder. Once that potential has been equalized and the builder and parts are bonded, there's no risk of static spark.

Illustration:
The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) is the authority for procedures on fueling aircraft including the ones that cost $200+ million dollars. They take great care in testing and the writing of code and procedures because of how much is at stake and the risk to human life. Back in the day, it was required to equalize a fuel truck to a grounding point (copper post in the ramp, I have many in my ramp) and then to the aircraft. With all the testing they've done, they revised their rules and no longer require the fuels trucks to ground before connecting to an aircraft. Its been like this for a while now. All thats required is the fuel truck to bond to the aircraft.

Point:
The NFPA has a lot more at stake than you do building your computer. Since there is no benefit to ground, don't do it. Just equalize the electrical potential by bonding with the wrist strap.

The problem with plugging in the PSU and not into the mobo is it can become difficult make that connection after everything else is plugged in. Put as much as you can on the mobo out of the case. Put the mobo in the case without the PSU being plugged in and install the rest of your gear including the power plugs for the mobo.

Though the risk is EXTREMELY low, if you have any power, stand-by included, running to your board, a dropped screwdriver, bracket, screw, could potentially make a connection to the power line and short something out.

If you still need a place to put the alligator clip, you can use the grounding post on the back of the PSU or plug the cord into the PSU and not the wall, and then bond to the grounding post on the PSU cord.


I guess that Aus.'s CASA is a bit behind the times, then... They still require the acft to be grounded, and the tanker to be grounded to the same ground point. I used to do megohm testing on the ground points at one of our airports. One day I had to wait to test a ground point as an acft that was late needed to make a fast turn-around. When they grounded the acft, a spark about .5 meter long and bright enough to be seen in bright sunlight jumped from the acft's gnd to the ground point...
August 29, 2009 1:57:25 AM

I'm US. I'm sure you still see it here too at airports that don't keep up on the times. We are very aggressive with liability reduction and follow all guidance to the letter when writing our policies and procedures and following the recommendations/regulations of groups like NFPA. Every update gets checked and rechecked.

An aircraft can build loads of static electricity in flight and if the static wicks off the back of the wings are damaged, only makes the electrical differential worse. Be thankful that potential didn't equallize when someone went to hook up a tow bar to the nose wheel. It'd knock you on your kester and you'd have numbness near the strike point.
August 29, 2009 2:21:05 AM

skora said:
I'm US. I'm sure you still see it here too at airports that don't keep up on the times. We are very aggressive with liability reduction and follow all guidance to the letter when writing our policies and procedures and following the recommendations/regulations of groups like NFPA. Every update gets checked and rechecked.

An aircraft can build loads of static electricity in flight and if the static wicks off the back of the wings are damaged, only makes the electrical differential worse. Be thankful that potential didn't equallize when someone went to hook up a tow bar to the nose wheel. It'd knock you on your kester and you'd have numbness near the strike point.


So the FAA no longer does it's job? As to the towbar, they are only used to push the acft out, not in, and the acft are required to be grounded during all ground operations. Fueling is frequently done at the gate. Sydney international has over 2500 seperate ground points, they all have to be tested (and tagged) twice a year.
August 29, 2009 3:09:00 AM

The FAA has required training that all fuelers have to complete and redo every 24 months. The airport actually writes the procedures that must be met based on NFPA code.

True, none of the aircraft are towed to the gate. But one of our tenant airlines (and it mights just be one of the ground crews that do this, cuz I've seen them do both)will hook the tug/towbar up once it stops and is chocked.

You definately have a few more ground points than I do. Does ICAO spell out the fueling procedures? I'm in airport ops. I'm the fueling police for chocks, bonds, and deadmans.
August 29, 2009 6:06:10 AM

skora said:
The FAA has required training that all fuelers have to complete and redo every 24 months. The airport actually writes the procedures that must be met based on NFPA code.

True, none of the aircraft are towed to the gate. But one of our tenant airlines (and it mights just be one of the ground crews that do this, cuz I've seen them do both)will hook the tug/towbar up once it stops and is chocked.

You definately have a few more ground points than I do. Does ICAO spell out the fueling procedures? I'm in airport ops. I'm the fueling police for chocks, bonds, and deadmans.


Casa makes all of the findings, many groups submit suggestions as to how the rules should be implemented then casa gets agreement from all parties (or not) and makes a ruling or lets the existing ruling stand.

As to Sydney having quite a few ground points, don't forget that Sydney domestic and Sydney international share all of the main infrastructure flight-side. And Sydney is one of the busier airports in the world... I used to know how many gates there were, but there are now many new ones. And then there are the maintenance facilities...

As to the towbar, ours have a pair of tires and the tow truck is required to ground to the same point as the acft prior to fastening the towbar. When the acft is cleared for taxi, all grounds are removed and the acft is pushed out. So I really can't see any poor sod getting knocked on his duff as long as everyone does his job. I had to take a week's training to 'learn' what was mostly common sense, and as I said earlier the conditions were crap as was the pay. Oh well, it paid for a few semesters of Uni.
!