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Replacement Power Supply

Last response: in Components
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November 20, 2009 11:49:28 AM

I've had this Gateway since February 09 and am pleased thus far. I've increased my RAM to 9 GB but now want to up my power supply from it's standard 500 W to something larger.

Various posts recommend 800 or more W. Does anyone recommend any particular one, and are there any issues I should consider before I buy? Do most power supply boxes come with the proper number and types of cables? I've never replaced a power supply so I'm not sure what all I need to know before I buy a replacement.

Thanks.

Jim
November 20, 2009 11:53:35 AM

I didn't specify my Gateway model, which is a Gateway FX6800-01e.

Jim
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a c 248 ) Power supply
November 20, 2009 12:13:24 PM

An 800 watt power supply is designed for use in a computer system with two video cards operating in dual mode. Is that what you're doing? Which video cards are you going to install?

The general rule of thumb is a high quality 500 to 550 watt power supply with sufficient current (amps) on the +12 volt rail(s) can easily power a system with any single video card made. A high quality 700 to 750 watt power supply with sufficient current on the +12 volt rail(s) can easily power a system with two video cards operating in dual mode. There are some exceptions such as the new ATI Radeon HD 5XXX series of energy efficient cards which require a little less power.

Corsair, PC Power & Cooling, and Seasonic are some of the brands with a reputation for high quality power supplies. They consistently earn high marks in technical reviews. They are reliable, stables and come with at least a 5 year warranty. Some Corsair models come with a 7 year warranty. Lately we've been seeing other brands offering a few high quality units.
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November 20, 2009 2:29:28 PM

I'm using the default video card that came with it (ATI Radeon HD 4850) only and don't expect to add another. I use this PC for video editing (Premiere Pro) and Photoshop.

I currently have the original 750 GB - Standard - Serial ATA-300 - 7200 rpm drive, plus another 5 drives added (1TB internal, 2 in the swapable bays, and 2 external drives - one esata & the other a usb) for a total of 6 drives. I might eventually like to add a another 1 or 2 external drives as well, but that's not for now.

I'm also planning on replacing the deafault CD/DVD drive with a BluRay writeable drive in the near future.

Even with my current 5 drives and the Bluray replacement, do I in fact have enough power with the 500 W I currently have?

Again, thanks for your ehlp.

Jim
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a c 248 ) Power supply
November 20, 2009 2:41:04 PM

Gateway and other off the shelf brands are notorious for not providing sufficient information about the power supplies installed in their pc's. Considering your stock psu is powering an Intel Core i7 920 system you should be okay. The drives use very very little wattage compared to the cpu and gpu.
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November 20, 2009 2:48:05 PM

Great ... that's good to know. I guess I will know, after I add the BluRay drive, etc, if I need more power, should I start getting system crashes or reboots. Thanks... you've saved me some money, at least for now.

Jim
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a c 144 ) Power supply
November 20, 2009 8:27:57 PM

The first symptom that you are likely to see is seemingly random reset/reboots during heavy 3D loads when the graphics card draws the most power.
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November 21, 2009 12:54:28 AM

Thanks for pointing out that tool Jack.... very nice tool.
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November 21, 2009 4:36:42 PM

Thanks to everyone for your insights, also for the calculation tool. It's a very useful page.

Jim
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November 21, 2009 7:16:52 PM

My old emachine died and took everything with it because of a bad PSU. I remember smelling something 'burning' one morning and found out it was my PC! :)  If I remember correctly, gateway bought emachines so yeah, a new PSU just MIGHT be a good idea ;) .
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