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I'm new and lost

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November 5, 2011 12:27:18 PM

Ok I have i7 2600K on gigabyte Z68MA-D2H-B3. I know very little about computers and every guide Ive read I cant comprehend. I dont want to go crazy, is there a safe setting I could input to get around 4.2 GHz without having to switch a bunch of settings I can barely locate in bios? Does anyone have this board/cpu that has some settings that worked for them in the 4.2-4.5 range they could share with me please. Any advice, other than a link to a guide I already have, would be so helpfull. I have liquid cooling and 950W power. 8GB Gskill sniper RAM. The PC was togather already and is meant for overclocking obviously and I just want a small boost, nothing super high. Thanks if anyone likes helping new people out and could walk me through it let me know we can do it over AIM-Email-here-phone-whatevers easiest!! PEACE

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a b K Overclocking
November 5, 2011 1:51:42 PM

You may be new here, but you are not lost!

Please don't rush into overclocking. Read some of the posts here, read some guides too. You will find yourself getting more and more familiar with OC. That would be the opportune time to venture into OC.

The problem with using some settings that have worked for someone else is that when something goes wrong, you will not be in a position to make the adjustments without OC knowledge and some OC experience.

As always, we are here to help you.
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November 5, 2011 1:59:34 PM

Ubrales said:
You may be new here, but you are not lost!

Please don't rush into overclocking. Read some of the posts here, read some guides too. You will find yourself getting more and more familiar with OC. That would be the opportune time to venture into OC.

The problem with using some settings that have worked for someone else is that when something goes wrong, you will not be in a position to make the adjustments without OC knowledge and some OC experience.

As always, we are here to help you.

From what ive read, i need to change the 34X to 42X for 4.2GHz. What other specific settings need to be changed in the process? I know how to reset cmos if something goes wrong. I also have cpu-z,linX, and a temp app already on it. Could you be specific as to what settings aside from the 34X need to be changed in small increments please? Thanks!!
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a b K Overclocking
November 5, 2011 7:27:16 PM

joshleeman said:
From what ive read, i need to change the 34X to 42X for 4.2GHz. What other specific settings need to be changed in the process? I know how to reset cmos if something goes wrong. I also have cpu-z,linX, and a temp app already on it. Could you be specific as to what settings aside from the 34X need to be changed in small increments please? Thanks!!

As you increase the multiplier (from 34x to 42x) the power requirements will also increase. This means that the voltage must also be increased in small increments; 0.050 volt increments. When you do this, the temps must be carefully monitored.

This will explain all this very methodically: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/265056-29-2600k-2500k... (I know you have a bunch of guides).
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a b K Overclocking
November 5, 2011 8:55:33 PM

All things cometh to he that waiteth - provided he that waiteth, worketh like hell while he waiteth!

Sorry off topic ,but I love the signature!!!!!!

Overclocking properly is an adventure not a destination. What works for one cpu may completely fail on another chip.
It is not an exact science but a set and test adventure.
Every chip is different on the microscopic level . These very minor differences are why chips are binned or sold at different speeds. Not all chips from the same wafer will run at the same speed.

Generally the chips from the center of the wafer will run faster with less voltage than the ones near the edge.

Take the above advice and learn how to overclock properly. So that you do not destroy that new chip of yours.
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a b K Overclocking
November 5, 2011 8:59:46 PM

Wow a quick edit less than a minute later shows 5 hours difference. WTH???
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a b K Overclocking
November 5, 2011 9:38:23 PM

Unolocogringo said:
Wow a quick edit less than a minute later shows 5 hours difference. WTH???

What do you mean? Your post was at 5:55 and the edit was at 5:57 - 2 minutes later!
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November 6, 2011 11:45:32 AM

Ubrales said:
As you increase the multiplier (from 34x to 42x) the power requirements will also increase. This means that the voltage must also be increased in small increments; 0.050 volt increments. When you do this, the temps must be carefully monitored.

This will explain all this very methodically: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/265056-29-2600k-2500k... (I know you have a bunch of guides).

That guide I havnt seen and its nice and basic language so thanks. The only issue I have is its P67 and a different brand, I have a Z68 gigabyte which they could be identical methods Im asuming theres gotta be some difference though right? Anyway he sais to up multi only without touching anything else until u lose stability, usually 4.2-4.7. So would u disagree with that?
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a b K Overclocking
November 6, 2011 1:27:18 PM

joshleeman said:
That guide I havnt seen and its nice and basic language so thanks. The only issue I have is its P67 and a different brand, I have a Z68 gigabyte which they could be identical methods Im asuming theres gotta be some difference though right? Anyway he sais to up multi only without touching anything else until u lose stability, usually 4.2-4.7. So would u disagree with that?

I agree with the guide. And when you do the overclocking, watch the temps closely.
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November 6, 2011 2:25:46 PM

Ubrales said:
I agree with the guide. And when you do the overclocking, watch the temps closely.

Ok so no differences between P67 and Z68 I need to be worried about? And whats considered a safe/ideal temp for the cpu, and if other temps are important which ones are they and what temps are ideal for those? Thanks so much!!
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a b K Overclocking
November 6, 2011 2:33:33 PM

joshleeman said:
Ok so no differences between P67 and Z68 I need to be worried about? And whats considered a safe/ideal temp for the cpu, and if other temps are important which ones are they and what temps are ideal for those? Thanks so much!!

The hottest (I mean in temps :)  ) part is the CPU. After the smoke clears (no pun intended) I like to see:

Idle temps <45 degrees C
Load temps <70 degrees C
At an ambient of 20 to 24 degrees C

This will really test your skills at CPU/heatsink selection and assembly.
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 6, 2011 2:39:36 PM

joshleeman said:
Ok so no differences between P67 and Z68 I need to be worried about? And whats considered a safe/ideal temp for the cpu, and if other temps are important which ones are they and what temps are ideal for those? Thanks so much!!


No differences to worry about :) 

Max temps should be under 75C when stress testing.
I don't think you need to monitor any other temps.
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November 7, 2011 11:10:29 AM

Ubrales said:
The hottest (I mean in temps :)  ) part is the CPU. After the smoke clears (no pun intended) I like to see:

Idle temps <45 degrees C
Load temps <70 degrees C
At an ambient of 20 to 24 degrees C

This will really test your skills at CPU/heatsink selection and assembly.

Yeah I dont understand or intend to go high enough to where volt changing is needed now. The liquid cooler that came with the PC is not like the nice ones on most high end rigs. It's one of those no maintenence ever, with thin black tubes and the cpu piece is a little bigger than a golf ball and I think the pump is in it because I cant see anywhere else it could be, and I dont see a resavoir anywhere either. It is a cheap mimic of the corsair all in 1 type thingys. So when u guys say under load/stress testing thats runing prime95? Is that the 1 u all recommend? Thanks
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a b K Overclocking
November 7, 2011 11:56:27 AM

Right, load testing is usually prime95 or a similar program.

Don't worry about the reservoir; the liquid in the radiator and in the tubing IS the reservoir!
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November 7, 2011 1:18:45 PM

Ubrales said:
Right, load testing is usually prime95 or a similar program.

Don't worry about the reservoir; the liquid in the radiator and in the tubing IS the reservoir!

Right ok sweet, what temp program do u recommend? Is prime95 the best one for load testing or is there a better one. Thanks for taking the time to help me out by the way, much appreciated!!
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a b K Overclocking
November 7, 2011 2:19:07 PM

joshleeman said:
Right ok sweet, what temp program do u recommend? Is prime95 the best one for load testing or is there a better one. Thanks for taking the time to help me out by the way, much appreciated!!

Prime95; I used prime95. I am not aware of other similar programs, but there must be others. All we need in one program that does the job.
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